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Subject: Paste ups?? rss

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I don't play the game you're discussing, so I don't know how much shuffling is involved, but if the game has a big deck and keeping cards secret is a very big deal, I suspect you'll be unhappy with your results. If the game is lighter, or the secrecy of the card content is not that important, then you will probably be OK. Ask yourself if lumpy cards are alright with you.

Also, I wouldn't recommend stickers, because they will be very thick. I would laser print onto a very good quality, but not very heavy white paper, then use white glue (like Elmer's) to glue small bits over the words. If you have a few extra cards, try scraping the worded area away to thin the card (if you're pasting up a lot of cards, don't bother, this will take forever) before adding your paste-up. A very fine-grit sandpaper might work surprisingly well -- you can pick this up cheap at any hardware store. I guess the best advice I can give you is to test your chosen method on some scrap cards to see if you are OK with the effect before defacing your set of cards.

If you want to see my conversion work, I just completed an entire homemade version of Roads and Boats, including about 600 pieces. I'll be posting some photos of my copy under the Roads and Boats entry in the next week or so.
 
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Chris Malme
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On the couple of games that I have done this for, I have preferred to create a new set of cards completely, either using precut card sheets, or standard card and a rotary trimmer.

It can be a little more work, and the cards may not look quite so flash as the originals, but I actually found it more straightforward, and it avoids the messiness of applying labels (either self adhesive or with glue)

It also means you have the original cards, unspoilt, should you ever wish to sell the game.

Chris
 
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Tim Franklin
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Chris__M wrote:
On the couple of games that I have done this for, I have preferred to create a new set of cards completely, either using precut card sheets, or standard card and a rotary trimmer.


The only thing I've made to date has been the UK map for Ticket to Ride. This was new tickets and a new board from scratch, colour laser printed onto nice shiny paper, spray glue onto some thin card, then a light (but not light enough - there's some blobbing) spray varnish.

The resulting tickets are OK to handle, but they only see fairly light use - draw, keep or discard - in the game. I don't know how well this would hold up for cards that are being shuffled, dealt, drawn, played repeatedly throughout the game.

TTFN,
Tim.
 
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Darrell Hanning
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I think you'd be better off either using whole-sheet label paper (printing multiple cards on each sheet), and redoing the entire card face (scanning in the originals first, and pasting up English with a photo-processing package), or printing new cards from processed scans (this is what I did with Wallenstein and die Macher).

Labels are just going to stick during shuffling, and eventually peel off. That is, if the adhesive doesn't smear and cause adjacent cards to stick together.

I use Corel Draw and Photo-Paint for this (and enhancements for dozens of other games), but it isn't exactly a cheap suite of software.

In any case, I think I'd invest in a cheap inkjet printer, too, unless the original cards are black and white. The real cost is in replacing the cartridges, of course.
 
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Sonja -

I've pasted up my copy of Dschunke using Mark Blanco's beautiful paste-ups posted here on the Geek at:

http://www.bggfiles.com/viewfile.php3?fileid=2170

Print them out on a full sheet of sticker paper, cut them out using an X-Acto knife, and stick them on the cards. There aren't a lot of these cards in the game so the extra thickness doesn't matter.

The final product looks great and is much easier than having to look at a translation.

It's funny, I have seen people that say the resale value of the game is adversely affected by the pasting up of the original cards. I'd be happy to pay more for a used game if the owner went to the trouble of pasting up the game. Saves me the trouble!

Rick Thornquist
Editor, GameWire
http://www.gamefest.com/news
 
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Tim K.
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Someone in a similar thread suggested just using old playing cards for paste-ups. Use the whole adhesive sheet print method and just put the new faces on the old cards. Then you don't have to worry about screwing up your original cards. You could even scale-up/down the printed sizes (depending on your needs and graphics skills) to accommodate non-standard playing card sizes.
 
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Norman Petry
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Sonja wrote:
I'm thinking of making my copy of Dschunke all in English, using paste ups. Is there a "best" way to do this?? Should I use really thin stickers to prevent the deck or individual pasted cards from becoming too fat?
[...]
Any other thoughts on this art?

Sonja kiss

Sonja,

I've never liked using paste-ups for cards -- instead preferring to create replacement cards -- for reasons explained here:

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/geekforum.php3?action=viewthrea...

In order to create high-quality replacement cards, you will need a player-aid that is designed with that use in mind. All of my own player-aids are intended to be used to create replacement cards, so they will contain sheets of cardbacks that are aligned to match the faces of the cards. If the player-aid was designed for paste-ups, the cardback design will be missing and/or the cards themselves won't be perfectly aligned on the sheets (since these are not critical for pasteups). You can still create cards without the backing design, but they won't look nearly as nice as the originals.

Unfortunately, it seems that most of the player-aids on the 'geek are designed to create paste-ups, so I usually end up creating my own layouts for the imported games I buy, rather than using what's available here. I haven't yet done one for Dschunke (though I do own the game, so maybe sometime...)

If you do decide to create cards, I suggest you download any of the player-aids I've created recently (you can find these under my profile). Each .zip file download contains a detailed construction guide for creating replacement cards and tiles. With a suitable design, and by following the directions in this guide you can create replacement cards that are often as good or even better than the originals!

If you decide to proceed with making cards, let us know how things turn out.

Good luck!
 
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Mark Taraba
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Quote:
It's funny, I have seen people that say the resale value of the game is adversely affected by the pasting up of the original cards. I'd be happy to pay more for a used game if the owner went to the trouble of pasting up the game. Saves me the trouble!


Well, depends on the paste-up job. You're assuming that the paste-up is up to your standards. Those that feel the game is worth less are assuming that the paste-up isn't up to their standards.

If someone says "Painted Figs" then some people think "Professionally painted figs that you would pay $500 for" and other people think "Really crappy painted figs (with neon green for grass) that you're going to have to strip the paint off when you get the game"
 
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Tim Kilgore
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You can always get card protectors, print your new cards on heavy card stock, cut them up, and stick them in the card protectors. This helps with the wear and tear, stiffens them up nicely, and has the advantage of having no need to worry about botching the job or otherwise goofing up your original cards.

Tim
 
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