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Subject: Your favorite playing card game(a normal deck of cards) rss

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Kenji Tsukida
Japan
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Please tell me your favorite game with a normal deck of cards
I like it and I would like to play with friends and brother.
And we like little high of difficulty.

Thank you in advance!
(Sorry for not good English..)
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HenningK
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Skat. It's the most popular card game in Germany. It is very deep, and I still learn new things and twists after playing for over 25 years.
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Judy Krauss
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Bowling Solitaire is a math-based, bowling-themed, strategy game played only with the Ace through 10 cards of two suits in a regular playing card deck.
Rules available here:
http://kisa.ca/bowling.html
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Richard Dewsbery
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Nomination whist (in the public domain with many different names and even more variant rules than names). The soundness of the game is testified to by the number of times that it's been "borrowed" in one form or another by published games, like Wizard and Canyon (to name but two from many).

 
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Chris Stanton
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Cribbage
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Stephen Tavener
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Spite & Malice. Don't let the commercial version fool you; this is a great traditional card game that really lives up to its name.

www.pagat.com is the best place for traditional card game rules, by the way.
 
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Ed G.
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500
 
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Steffan O'Sullivan
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Cribbage.
Hearts.
Spades.
Bridge.
Bid Whist.

Edit:

Oh yes, also:
Euchre
Gin Rummy
Oh Hell
 
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Imp Rovius
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Euchre. It's like Bridge on meth.
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Ludovic Roy
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improvius wrote:
Euchre. It's like Bridge on meth.


Ditto
 
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Toco
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Bunker Assault, but losing is easier then winning in this one ...
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David
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Being Swiss this obviously includes some kind of Jass:
* Schieber when 4 players
* Coiffeur when 4 players with a lot of time
* Bieter when 3 players

Other games:
* Rummy
* Daihinmin
* Palace
* Canasta
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Shane Larsen
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Up & Down the River, aka Oh Hell!

Trick-taking where you predict the number of tricks to start each round and are best rewarded for predicting right. So you can't be dealt a bad hand; you can only predict and/or play your hand poorly.

Enjoy!
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James
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Poker

I am a little embarrassed at the lack of imagination, but I loved No Limit Texas Hold'em when it was the trendy suburban game a few years ago. I have board games I'd rather play now, but if I were playing a 52 deck card game, this would be the one. It has a good, structured pace with a good build up of intensity toward the end. The downsides include player elimination as a major element and the necessity of having a decent set of chips. Finally, you'd probably need to get information on how to set up a game for your particular group from a book or web page (blind amounts, etc.).

It's not a game that is meant for casual play, then; it's more of an "event" game. Depending on your group situation it may or may not be a good fit.
 
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Jonathan Harrison
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Up and Down the River is one of my all-time favorite games. I learned it in Papua New Guinea years ago, and picked it up again after getting married. We started by playing Tennessee-style Rook, which my wife greatly enjoyed. Then I remembered UDR, and it quickly become the only trick-taking game we play any more. My wife loves it, our other gaming partner loves it (which is a feat; he's generally a person of mild passions), and I give it a 9.8. There's (I gather) a few variations on the rules; here's how our games play:
Quote:
• 4 suits, numbered 1 to 13 (we use a slimmed-down Rook deck; most people use standard playing cards).
• 1s are high.
For n = 1 to x:
• Deal n card(s) to each player.
• Flip the top card of the remaining deck as trump.
• Thumping fists, on the third thump, each player pops a finger or fingers to bid the number of tricks he'll take.
• High bid wins; rethump all players for tied high bids.
• Starting with the high bidder, and following suit and losing to trump, play each trick. Trick-taker leads.
Scoring:
+1 point for each trick taken
+10 points for making your bid exactly
–1 point for each absolute point of difference between your number of tricks taken and tricks bid
• Play from 1 to x and back down to 1 again.

Example:
• Round 6; each player dealt 6 cards
• Simultaneously, Jonathan bids 3, Jane bids 2, Jesse bids 2—the group is overbid by 1 trick
• Jonathan takes 4 tricks: 4 (tricks) – 1 (point of difference from bid) = 3 points
• Jane takes 0 tricks: 0 (tricks) – 2 (points of difference from bid) = –2 points
• Jesse takes 2 tricks: 2 (tricks) + 10 (for making his bid exactly) = 12 points

My collection note:
Quote:
Brilliant bidding game: perfect tension between possibility and actuality. Trying like mad to lose tricks after you takes ones you didn't bid on taking nearly defines this game; trying like madder to take tricks after you lost ones you were counting on does even more. And trying to calculate your bid based on whether you think you'll win the lead or not is the essence of this game.

2-player fine; shines with 3 players or, preferably, more.
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Shane Larsen
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HuginnGreiling wrote:
Up and Down the River is one of my all-time favorite games. I learned it in Papua New Guinea years ago, and picked it up again after getting married. We started by playing Tennessee-style Rook, which my wife greatly enjoyed. Then I remembered UDR, and it quickly become the only trick-taking game we play any more. My wife loves it, our other gaming partner loves it (which is a feat; he's generally a person of mild passions), and I give it a 9.8. There's (I gather) a few variations on the rules; here's how our games play:
Quote:
• 4 suits, numbered 1 to 13 (we use a slimmed-down Rook deck; most people use standard playing cards).
• 1s are high.
For n = 1 to x:
• Deal n card(s) to each player.
• Flip the top card of the remaining deck as trump.
• Thumping fists, on the third thump, each player pops a finger or fingers to bid the number of tricks he'll take.
• High bid wins; rethump all players for tied high bids.
• Starting with the high bidder, and following suit and losing to trump, play each trick. Trick-taker leads.
Scoring:
+1 point for each trick taken
+10 points for making your bid exactly
–1 point for each absolute point of difference between your number of tricks taken and tricks bid
• Play from 1 to x and back down to 1 again.

Example:
• Round 6; each player dealt 6 cards
• Simultaneously, Jonathan bids 3, Jane bids 2, Jesse bids 2—the group is overbid by 1 trick
• Jonathan takes 4 tricks: 4 (tricks) – 1 (point of difference from bid) = 3 points
• Jane takes 0 tricks: 0 (tricks) – 2 (points of difference from bid) = –2 points
• Jesse takes 2 tricks: 2 (tricks) + 10 (for making his bid exactly) = 12 points

My collection note:
Quote:
Brilliant bidding game: perfect tension between possibility and actuality. Trying like mad to lose tricks after you takes ones you didn't bid on taking nearly defines this game; trying like madder to take tricks after you lost ones you were counting on does even more. And trying to calculate your bid based on whether you think you'll win the lead or not is the essence of this game.

2-player fine; shines with 3 players or, preferably, more.


Jon, you and I play it mostly the same, with these differences:

1. No negative points for missing your bid.
2. Round 4 (4 cards) is called Rainbow Round. If a player is dealt one card of each suit, he has a rainbow hand, which immediately awards the player with 14 points (max for the round) and the round is not played.
3. The first round (with 1 card) is played indian-poker style. (You may have just omitted this in your rules breakdown.)


COMMENTS

On difference #1: This rule throws a curve ball into game play when someone takes one too many tricks. At that point, that player is doing everything he can to win as many tricks as possible for more points. So it can screw everybody else up real quickly. Also, it encourages players to bid high with a good hand: "Wow, I can take a bunch this round, but what if I don't hit my bid? ... Well, at least I'm getting a point no matter what ... Here goes!" This may or may not appeal to players. It's pretty awesome when you're in the 8th round and someone puts out SIX fingers. Because of this, I require ALL players to have both hands on the table for fist thumping after the fifth round.

On difference #2: Purely a randomness element added to the game. I often ask the players if they want to play with the rainbow rule before we start, and my family likes it. It probably only happens once in every 5 or 6 games.

On difference #3: It just makes the first round a little more interesting as it's all about reading your opponents.

I love that this is your favorite standard-deck game too! It's been a favorite in my family for years now. Good fun!
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Jonathan Harrison
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thedacker wrote:
Jon, you and I play it mostly the same, with these differences:

1. No negative points for missing your bid.

This rule throws a curve ball into game play when someone takes one too many tricks. At that point, that player is doing everything he can to win as many tricks as possible for more points. So it can screw everybody else up real quickly.

Aha. This is the most common comment I see about the negative points rule. But it actually doesn't incur players a penalty for going over. It just doesn't reward for going over, except by hurting other players. The math, in easy form, is this: for going over, you get as many points as you bid.

For example: I bid 4, take 6. My points = 6 (tricks) – 2 (variance from bid) = 4, which equals my bid. It always works out like that. So if you take more tricks than you bid, you don't get awarded extra points for that (though you still get your bid in points), but you take points from the other players. The incentive is affecting others' scores instead of one's own. It makes it a tighter game—there's a much greater tension deciding between taking your bid exactly or going over to spite the others while limiting your points to your bid.

And nope, no rainbow round for us. I have heard about the Indian poker rule, but I've never actually played it that way. Maybe sometime we'll give it a try.

It's always interesting seeing the variations in rules for this game!
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Imp Rovius
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HuginnGreiling wrote:
thedacker wrote:
Jon, you and I play it mostly the same, with these differences:

1. No negative points for missing your bid.

This rule throws a curve ball into game play when someone takes one too many tricks. At that point, that player is doing everything he can to win as many tricks as possible for more points. So it can screw everybody else up real quickly.

Aha. This is the most common comment I see about the negative points rule. But it actually doesn't incur players a penalty for going over. It just doesn't reward for going over, except by hurting other players. The math, in easy form, is this: for going over, you get as many points as you bid.

For example: I bid 4, take 6. My points = 6 (tricks) – 2 (variance from bid) = 4, which equals my bid. It always works out like that. So if you take more tricks than you bid, you don't get awarded extra points for that (though you still get your bid in points), but you take points from the other players. The incentive is affecting others' scores instead of one's own. It makes it a tighter game—there's a much greater tension deciding between taking your bid exactly or going over to spite the others while limiting your points to your bid.

And nope, no rainbow round for us. I have heard about the Indian poker rule, but I've never actually played it that way. Maybe sometime we'll give it a try.

It's always interesting seeing the variations in rules for this game!


I used to play this with my grandparents all the time.

-Went 7-6-5-4-3-2-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
-Used "Indian poker" (I guess - is that the one when you hold her card up backwards so everyone except you can see it?)
-Bidding went in order starting at dealer's left. The only rule is that the sum of all bids could NOT match the number of available tricks. So the dealer would frequently be screwed into bidding higher or lower than they wanted to.
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Kevin B. Smith
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I haven't played it, but the one I am most interested in trying is Scopa.
 
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Michael Becker
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David Partletts 99 - a fantastic three player game which really deserves more attention and love.

Two player - cribbage

Four player - bridge or any standard whist games.

Michael
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Judy Krauss
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peakhope wrote:
I haven't played it, but the one I am most interested in trying is Scopa.


It looks pretty interesting to me, too. I just went to the link listed on it's BGG page and checked out the rules.
 
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Sim Guy
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The old standards:
Hearts
Spades
Gin Rummy
Whist
...for fun

Poker
Blackjack
...for $$$
 
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Shane Larsen
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improvius wrote:
HuginnGreiling wrote:
thedacker wrote:
Jon, you and I play it mostly the same, with these differences:

1. No negative points for missing your bid.

This rule throws a curve ball into game play when someone takes one too many tricks. At that point, that player is doing everything he can to win as many tricks as possible for more points. So it can screw everybody else up real quickly.

Aha. This is the most common comment I see about the negative points rule. But it actually doesn't incur players a penalty for going over. It just doesn't reward for going over, except by hurting other players. The math, in easy form, is this: for going over, you get as many points as you bid.

For example: I bid 4, take 6. My points = 6 (tricks) – 2 (variance from bid) = 4, which equals my bid. It always works out like that. So if you take more tricks than you bid, you don't get awarded extra points for that (though you still get your bid in points), but you take points from the other players. The incentive is affecting others' scores instead of one's own. It makes it a tighter game—there's a much greater tension deciding between taking your bid exactly or going over to spite the others while limiting your points to your bid.

And nope, no rainbow round for us. I have heard about the Indian poker rule, but I've never actually played it that way. Maybe sometime we'll give it a try.

It's always interesting seeing the variations in rules for this game!


I used to play this with my grandparents all the time.

-Went 7-6-5-4-3-2-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
-Used "Indian poker" (I guess - is that the one when you hold her card up backwards so everyone except you can see it?)
-Bidding went in order starting at dealer's left. The only rule is that the sum of all bids could NOT match the number of available tricks. So the dealer would frequently be screwed into bidding higher or lower than they wanted to.


Hmmm. So did you call it Down and Up the River?

Not sure how I feel about taking away the fist-pounding and tension in simultaneous bidding. That's one of the greatest moments for me.

Jon, I'll have to try the bid-minus-difference rule next time. Sounds interesting. Give the indian-poker round a try. It's fun to read your opponents. And when nobody's holding a trump card, it makes for a grueling decision..."Shoot, nobody's got a trump. But they all had an easy time deciding what to do. That means...

Great game.
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http://www.pagat.com/boston/rik.html
 
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Jordan Robbins
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HuginnGreiling wrote:
Up and Down the River is one of my all-time favorite games. I learned it in Papua New Guinea years ago, and picked it up again after getting married. We started by playing Tennessee-style Rook, which my wife greatly enjoyed. Then I remembered UDR, and it quickly become the only trick-taking game we play any more. My wife loves it, our other gaming partner loves it (which is a feat; he's generally a person of mild passions), and I give it a 9.8. There's (I gather) a few variations on the rules; here's how our games play:
Quote:
• 4 suits, numbered 1 to 13 (we use a slimmed-down Rook deck; most people use standard playing cards).
• 1s are high.
For n = 1 to x:
• Deal n card(s) to each player.
• Flip the top card of the remaining deck as trump.
• Thumping fists, on the third thump, each player pops a finger or fingers to bid the number of tricks he'll take.
• High bid wins; rethump all players for tied high bids.
• Starting with the high bidder, and following suit and losing to trump, play each trick. Trick-taker leads.
Scoring:
+1 point for each trick taken
+10 points for making your bid exactly
–1 point for each absolute point of difference between your number of tricks taken and tricks bid
• Play from 1 to x and back down to 1 again.

Example:
• Round 6; each player dealt 6 cards
• Simultaneously, Jonathan bids 3, Jane bids 2, Jesse bids 2—the group is overbid by 1 trick
• Jonathan takes 4 tricks: 4 (tricks) – 1 (point of difference from bid) = 3 points
• Jane takes 0 tricks: 0 (tricks) – 2 (points of difference from bid) = –2 points
• Jesse takes 2 tricks: 2 (tricks) + 10 (for making his bid exactly) = 12 points

My collection note:
Quote:
Brilliant bidding game: perfect tension between possibility and actuality. Trying like mad to lose tricks after you takes ones you didn't bid on taking nearly defines this game; trying like madder to take tricks after you lost ones you were counting on does even more. And trying to calculate your bid based on whether you think you'll win the lead or not is the essence of this game.

2-player fine; shines with 3 players or, preferably, more.


also one of my favorite games, but we're used a slightly different scoring system.

0 points for getting your bid
5 points for every trick you missed your bid by, so if I bid 2 and I only take 1 Trick I get 5 point, but if I take 5 tricks I get 15 points.

-10 points for bidding to take all of the tricks and then actually doing it

Lowest score wins

we also played Indian Poker during the round with only one card.

This scoring system give players the option to bid very low, even 0 and still do very well, giving the game a little bit of a "hearts" feel. some of the most interesting rounds are when everyone bids 1 or 0 and there are 7 tricks to go around.
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