$30.00
Recommend
66 
 Thumb up
 Hide
29 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

Dune CCG» Forums » Reviews

Subject: “God Created Dune CCG to Train the Faithful.” – Paul Muad'Dib Atreides, also Known as Usul rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Sean Chick (Formerly Paul O'Sullivan)
United States
New Orleans
Louisiana
flag msg tools
designer
Fag an bealac! Riam nar druid ar sbarin lann! Cuimhnigidh ar Luimnech agus feall na Sassonach! Erin go Bragh! Remember Ireland and Fontenoy!
badge
Well, I'm afraid it'll have to wait. Whatever it was, I'm sure it was better than my plan to get out of this by pretending to be mad. I mean, who would have noticed another madman round here?
mbmbmbmbmb
Dune CCG is a customizable card game based on Frank Herbert's Dune. It is a product of the CCG boom that followed Magic: The Gathering. Since there were games like Middle-Earth, Babylon 5 Collectible Card Game, Aliens vs. Predator, Highlander: The Card Game, Star Wars Customizable Card Game, X-Files, Doctor Who Collectible Card Game, and Star Trek: Customizable Card Game (first edition), I guess it was inevitable that the Dune universe would get the CCG treatment. Fortunately (and in spite of its low rank on BGG) Dune CCG managed to be unique, challenging, and all around perfect for a fan like myself. It is even more miraculous that this game came from Last Unicorn Games (please no Mia Farrow jokes), a short-lived company that made Heresy and Star Trek Red Alert before being devoured by Wizards of the Coast.

I’ll try to be quite through with my review but I will not catch or remember everything. Dune CCG is a pretty involved game and as such there will be things missing in my review. Also, being a total nerd for the first book I decided to nerd out here. I hope the Dune fans can appreciate that. Oh, and I wrote this while listening to Toto.

On Arrakis You Need Desert Power


“A beginning is the time for taking the most delicate care that the balances are correct. This every sister of the Bene Gesserit knows. To begin your study of the life of Muad’Dib, then take care that you first place him in his time: born in the 57th year of the Padishah Emperor, Shaddam IV. And take the most special care that you locate Muad'Dib in his place: the planet Arrakis. Do not be deceived by the fact that he was born on Caladan and lived his first fifteen years there. Arrakis, the planet known as Dune, is forever his place.” – Princess Irulan




Gameplay (60/60): In Dune CCG you are a minor house which seeks entrance into the Landsraad High Council and has recruited the aid one of six factions (another three were added in the expansions). These include three great Houses: Atreides, Harkonnen, and Corrino, four Dune based factions (Water Sellers, Fremen, Spice Miners Union, and Smugglers), and the Spacing Guild and the Bene Gesserit Sisterhood.

The Original Six Factions


Each of these factions has special strengths and weaknesses. Who you choose depends largely upon the kind of cards you want to play, so without further ado, let’s acquaint ourselves with the cards that run Dune CCG. Of course if such complexity overwhelms you, remember what Paul said: “The Fremen were supreme in that quality the ancients called "spannungsbogen" — which is the self-imposed delay between desire for a thing and the act of reaching out to grasp that thing.”



First Card Type: Personas

These cards represent talented individuals who will aid you in your objective. They usually have skills for dueling (where they attack a persona), intrigue (another way to target personas), arbitration (where they can target charters) and/or battle (allows you to attack fiefs). Other, more rare talents include weirding (a Bene Gesserit technique) and Prescience. Personas come in two varieties.

Ally Cards


Allies represent unique characters, including the famous and not so famous characters from the book, as well as some figures made up by the designers. To use these allies you must win a bid to gain their services. Get used to this mechanic and many others, for it seems Dune CCG combines every gaming mechanic under the sun.

Aide Cards


These represent more generic personalities who will assist you. While not as powerful as many allies, these guys can be straight out purchased without bidding, making them much more reliable.



Second Card Type: Holdings

Holdings generally produce solaris (money) but can generate other resources. These cards are the engine of the game, for without a good cash flow you are doomed.

Fief Cards


These represent the lands you own and they are usually protected through soldiers. There are three kinds of fiefs. One is your homeworld, which usually produces a lot of solaris and is more safe than other fiefs. Another fief is a Dune fief, which gives you control over a special part of Arrakis, but it must be bid on to be secured. Some of these are deserts, which produce spice for the Guild hoard or for yourself, that is if you are crazy and want to control Dune. Then there is Dune itself, which counts as a Siridar fief, which means it can be targetted by both battle and arbitration. You have to give up your homeworld to gain it. While this can be painful, remember Paul’s wisdom:

“There existed no need on Caladan to build a physical paradise or a paradise of the mind — we could see the actuality all around us. And the price we paid was the price men have always paid for achieving a paradise in this life — we went soft, we lost our edge.”

Charter Cards


These represent special contracts that you bid upon. They are usually straightforward, but must also be guarded from the deadly rite of arbitration. In America this rite is indeed deadly, although more tame when compared to the desert hellscape of Dune.



Third Card Type: Resources

These cards are used to bolster your holdings and personas, both for defense and attack.

Personnel Cards


These represent groups of trained people, varying from soldiers, to assassins, to delegations and even missionaries. They can be assigned to personas, charters, or fiefs, affording them protection and in the case of a persona, some attacking power.

Equipment Cards


These are pretty much like personnel and add some of the Dune universe's technology to the game. Them seem to me to be a little more potent and versatile than most personnel cards, although they tend to be more expensive.



Fourth Card Type: Events

These cards represent occurrences that effect all players. They are quite powerful and usually have have time limits. They also rarely appear right away, and you must add token to them before they go off.

Event Cards




Fifth Card Type: Plans

These cards represent special actions that are taken beyond the normal dance of attack and defend. These cards are effective at achieving surprise or driving home your victory. Another type of plan is the program, but I have barely played with these so I won’t comment on them.

Venture Cards


These cards can alter other cards in permanent ways, although they are also useful in allowing you to perform multiple rites. Normally you may only duel or battle once per turn. Some ventures will allow you to do this twice and with some special benefits.

Tactic Cards


These cards are one-offs used to gain a quick but decisive advantage at any given time.




The Game Itself

Okay, so I’ve done a quick take on each of these cards, but it is not enough to know what you have. You must know your objectives and the world in which you’ll fight for dominance. As Paul would say, “The power to destroy a thing is the absolute control over it.”

Each player starts the game with their homeworld, 10 favor, 20 solaris and no spice, although 5 starting solaris can be used to tweak the starting favor, solaris, and/or spice of your House. Each player has two decks. One is imperial (allies, charters, and fiefs) mostly representing their sponsor and their resources. The other deck is called the house deck and represents the resources of your house, including aides, equipment, personnel, and tactics. This is the heart and soul of your House, for while it is cool to have the Padishah Emperor Shaddam IV on your side, a House Assassin is arguably much cooler.

The goal is to have at least 10 spice and 10 favor and gain access to the High Council. That’s right! You are not here to be Genghis Khan/Conan and “crush your enemies” although it doesn’t hurt. This is a game of intrigue, bidding, and alliances. Spice is the real goal and it is either bought from the hoard, where it is limited and the price can be quite steep, or it is mined. Another way to win is to be the last man standing if other players have exhausted their house deck (think of of it as exhausting your House resources) or had their favor drop to zero (I imagine the Sardaukar will then pay you visit although if they are bringing Irulan I’d stick around).

As for turns each is comprised of phases. Cards that were engaged (tapped in Magic: The Gathering) and unengaged. Cards that were subdued (the fate of most lost cards) are given tokens, which means they will return in time. Dune CCG is not a game of annihilation, and most cards that are played stay in play. Once these housekeeping phases are complete initiative is determined by comparing house favor, which can be temporarily boosted or decreased with cards. In order of house favor, from highest to lowest, players will conduct their house intervals. Here players may begin rites, engage cards for effects, bid on imperial cards, conduct ventures, buy or sell spice, buy favor, deploy events, and deploy house cards from hand or from the subdued position. The rites though are the meat of the game, for this is how you attack other players to gain an advantage. Here is where those skills in dueling, battle, arbitration, and intrigue come in handy. If you win an opponent’s cards are subdued and you can gain favor from battles and duels or solaris through arbitration and intrigue or make the opponent lose favor or solaris. After all players have conducted their intervals they may discard from their hand (house cards) and assembly (imperial cards) and a new turn begins.

As you can see Dune CCG is not for the faint of heart. It requires intelligent play and prudence, as well as patience to learn the game's nuances. The experience on a multiplayer level is dazzling, as players must compete but also form temporary alliances. With no strict rules on negotiation it is an anything goes free for all that might make a libertarian happy (or exasperated).



Accessibility (10/15): The game is complex and initially marred by a convoluted and disorganized rulebook that read like a soap opera. The second edition rulebook was vastly superior and saves the game, although it will never be easy to learn due to its complexity and unique mechanics. However, some of this may have been inevitable given the game’s depth and fealty to the source material. For those who are not in the “mood” to digest such rules, Gurney Halleck has some words for you:

“Mood? What has mood to do with it? You fight when the necessity arises — no matter the mood! Mood's a thing for cattle or making love or playing the baliset. It's not for fighting.”




Components (15/15): This is tricky and depends greatly upon how much you liked the look of the 1984 movie, since the card art draws a lot from Lynch’s vision, although later expansions got away from these motifs. Being a fan of the 1984 film (one of only three Lynch films I actually like) the images enhance the game considerably, and many of the best card artists of the era worked on Dune CCG, putting out imagery that was superior to most of the dull and garish designs of other CCGs. Even when the art was derivative, it had flair.

Piter De Vries art by Mark Zugg


In some ways this was a risky move on the part of Last Unicorn Games because Lynch’s film was a flop, although it as since then gained a genuine cult following. Arguably, in terms of aesthetics, Last Unicorn Games avoided the fate of Duke Leto: “There it is, Piter - the largest mantrap in all history. And the Duke's headed into its jaws. Is it not a magnificent thing that I, the Baron Vladimir Harkonnen, do?” - Baron Vladimir Harkonnen



Theme (10/10): Dune CCG implements the theme successfully and on many levels. On the one hand nearly every character, from such major players as Yueh and Stilgar to men mentioned in throw away lines, such as Pardee and Fedor, are represented. Best of all the game requires cunning, and forces you to consider numerous elements all at once: war, spice, intrigue, money, etc. In this the game is complex and it rewards subtly and prudence. Nothing could be more in line with Herbert’s creation.

Atreides Cards


Dune CCG is also unique when compared to other CCGs because of its deep play, which is in line with the source material. This is important because Dune CCG feels less like a money grab and more like a labor of love. Arguably, that is why the game never got beyond the death of Duke Leto in terms of chronology, but I think the game failed more so due to difficult rules and a silly production schedule imposed on Last Unicorn Games by Wizards of the Coast.

Best of all, while games like Star Wars Customizable Card Game were making all the big personalities rare, the folks at Last Unicorn Games did the opposite. Most of the leading personas of the Dune universe were readily available in the starter decks. It allows you to jump into the game more easily, because you can use Feyd or Chani right off the bat, while a poor kid playing Star Wars Customizable Card Game is going to be using a lot of Jawas. In that respect, Dune CCG is a pleasant experience.

“The mystery of life isn't a problem to solve, but a reality to experience.” - Reverend Mother Gaius Helen Mohiam



Overall (95/100): Long out of print and climbing in value, Dune CCG is a hard game to find. Even on ebay the pickings are slim, and on BGG the forums are nearly dead. What makes it more daunting is the need for more than two-players, as the game thrives best with multiple factions. Added to this difficulty of the rules, which will break many except those with a Fremen like devotion to the subject. I have that and I have come to see Dune CCG as an underrated classic. For now I’m just making decks which I plan to give to others and teach them the game. That makes Dune CCG more like a boardgame, but in a way it is only right, for the game has the feeling not of card crack but rather like a juiced version of the Avalon Hill classic. Such is my love of the game that I've even made cards in an attempt to expand my decks.

Some Cards I Made for Dune CCG








Alas this review is at an end, but I'll offer you the parting sentiment of my favorite Dune character, Thufir Hawat…

“Parting with friends is a sadness. A place is only a place.”

55 
 Thumb up
4.15
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brian Cwikla

Burbank
California
msg tools
mbmbmbmb
Wow - fantastic review!! Thank you for writing such a detailed and well illustrated review. I've wondered about this game and how it played. I'm a big fan of "dead" ccg systems and collecting them. Perhaps I need to start searching for this one.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Darrell Hanning
United States
Jacksonville
Florida
flag msg tools
We will meet at the Hour of Scampering.
mbmbmbmbmb
I don't see Lynch's Dune as a "flop", anymore than I could see Kubrick's 2001 as a flop. It simply was watched by too many critics who either hadn't first read the novel, or couldn't let go of their own image of what the story should look like, and let Lynch's image soak in.

Some of the best movies of all time were not successful at the box office.
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Erik Nicely
United States
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Nice review. I owned an 800-count box full of cards for this game, a game store employee gave them to me. Shai Hulud claimed them (no doubt in all of that desert I crossed) when I moved across the country and they disappeared. Wish I still had them so I could play.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
James 3
United States
Atlanta
Georgia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
confused how this game had the DUne license, but a reprint of the Avalon Hill classic couldnt secure it...REX is coming soon, but personally im only interested if it has the Dune theme on it. Anyone have any insight into licensing, and what set this game apart where the AH reprint couldnt?

looks like this game has the faction asymmetry aspect and looks cool...but with the starting faction decks hard to find on ebay and obtuse rules requiring multiple players...i think i have to pass on trying to get into this despite my love of the novels...
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Gordon Watson
United Kingdom
Banstead
Surrey - United Kingdom
flag msg tools
ASL - other tactical wargames call it Sir.
badge
Beneath this mask there is an idea.....and ideas are bulletproof.
mbmbmbmbmb
Excellent review - I've been interested in trading for this for some time but no nibbles at all.

I am assuming that a starter for each of the factions is a must, but what else would you need for a reasonable 'play' set?
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Merric Blackman
Australia
Waubra
Victoria
flag msg tools
designer
Ramping up my reviewing.
badge
Happily playing games for many, many years.
mbmbmbmbmb
flamejuggler wrote:
confused how this game had the DUne license, but a reprint of the Avalon Hill classic couldnt secure it...REX is coming soon, but personally im only interested if it has the Dune theme on it. Anyone have any insight into licensing, and what set this game apart where the AH reprint couldnt?


Ah, there lies a complicated and tangled tale that I've only seen the periphery of.

Dune has had a number of game adaptations over the years - the Avalon Hill game, the computer game, and this CCG. The CCG was produced by Last Unicorn Games - a company of great designers and lousy developers - who, towards the end of their existence, decided to put out a Dune role-playing game.

The CCG had come out in 1997, and had a troubled history. Its original rarity system was problematic, the Rolling Thunder release schedule was worse (eventually, Rolling Thunder would be reinvented by FFG with their LCG concept and work a *lot* better), and so in 1998 the CCG was cancelled. So.

Work continued on the RPG, and it managed to have a release date that was pushed back, then pushed back again, and then still again... and then, before we knew it, Wizards of the Coast bought Last Unicorn Games. They started work on a Dune d20 RPG, printed a limited edition of the Icon-version of the Dune game... and then that was it. This was 2000.

Matt Colville, who worked on the d20 version, notes that the command to stop work on the d20 game came directly from Hasbro (no more licensed games!), and that was that. Matt also notes that there were other issues...

...and it doesn't take much to guess that there were licensing issues. Last Unicorn Games should have been able to put out the game on their own. And, since 2001, there have been no Dune games in any format.

1979: Avalon Hill Dune boardgame
1984: Parker Brothers Dune boardgame
1992: Dune computer game
1992: Dune II computer game
1997: Dune CCG
1998: Dune 2000 computer game (Dune II with better graphics)
2000: Dune RPG
2001: Frank Herbert's Dune computer game
2001: Emperor, Battle for Dune computer game

12 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
JP
Canada
Lethbridge
Alberta
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for the great review on what was an awesome CCG. I only managed to play this a few times but it left a great impression on me, so much so that to this day I still scour the internet to find Dune cards for sale. It was always tough getting people to play the game though because, like you said, it requires subtlety and patience...
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Patrick
United States
Hanover
MD
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm really curious as to how a rule book can read like a soap opera.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean Chick (Formerly Paul O'Sullivan)
United States
New Orleans
Louisiana
flag msg tools
designer
Fag an bealac! Riam nar druid ar sbarin lann! Cuimhnigidh ar Luimnech agus feall na Sassonach! Erin go Bragh! Remember Ireland and Fontenoy!
badge
Well, I'm afraid it'll have to wait. Whatever it was, I'm sure it was better than my plan to get out of this by pretending to be mad. I mean, who would have noticed another madman round here?
mbmbmbmbmb
PatOs wrote:
I'm really curious as to how a rule book can read like a soap opera.


That is what I thought in 1997. Not sure where my original rulebook is so I can't point to a line, and maybe my opinion would change. Either way, the rules as written in 1997 were impossible.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean Chick (Formerly Paul O'Sullivan)
United States
New Orleans
Louisiana
flag msg tools
designer
Fag an bealac! Riam nar druid ar sbarin lann! Cuimhnigidh ar Luimnech agus feall na Sassonach! Erin go Bragh! Remember Ireland and Fontenoy!
badge
Well, I'm afraid it'll have to wait. Whatever it was, I'm sure it was better than my plan to get out of this by pretending to be mad. I mean, who would have noticed another madman round here?
mbmbmbmbmb
DarrellKH wrote:
I don't see Lynch's Dune as a "flop", anymore than I could see Kubrick's 2001 as a flop. It simply was watched by too many critics who either hadn't first read the novel, or couldn't let go of their own image of what the story should look like, and let Lynch's image soak in.

Some of the best movies of all time were not successful at the box office.


2001 was a hit in 1968, and Dune is by definition a flop, both critically and financially. Harlan Ellison thought it was because critics were denied advanced screenings. Then there is the fact that the film is strange and yet it was marketed for children. I have the toys which might be the best thing LJN ever did.

Like you said though, it doesn't mean the movie sucks, and many failed films gained prominence only after their first showing (It’s A Wonderful Life, Blade Runner). I should know, I was watching The Big Lebowski long before it became a cult movie.

I just wish Lynch would stop bitching about how he "started selling out on Dune" and make a director's cut.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean Chick (Formerly Paul O'Sullivan)
United States
New Orleans
Louisiana
flag msg tools
designer
Fag an bealac! Riam nar druid ar sbarin lann! Cuimhnigidh ar Luimnech agus feall na Sassonach! Erin go Bragh! Remember Ireland and Fontenoy!
badge
Well, I'm afraid it'll have to wait. Whatever it was, I'm sure it was better than my plan to get out of this by pretending to be mad. I mean, who would have noticed another madman round here?
mbmbmbmbmb
domus_ludorum wrote:
Excellent review - I've been interested in trading for this for some time but no nibbles at all.

I am assuming that a starter for each of the factions is a must, but what else would you need for a reasonable 'play' set?


I'd say a starter deck for each faction. The starters also come with a rare persona (somehow I got two Thufier Hawat cards in the first three starters I bought). After that some booster packs from the Eye of the Storm set.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean Chick (Formerly Paul O'Sullivan)
United States
New Orleans
Louisiana
flag msg tools
designer
Fag an bealac! Riam nar druid ar sbarin lann! Cuimhnigidh ar Luimnech agus feall na Sassonach! Erin go Bragh! Remember Ireland and Fontenoy!
badge
Well, I'm afraid it'll have to wait. Whatever it was, I'm sure it was better than my plan to get out of this by pretending to be mad. I mean, who would have noticed another madman round here?
mbmbmbmbmb
flamejuggler wrote:
confused how this game had the DUne license, but a reprint of the Avalon Hill classic couldnt secure it...REX is coming soon, but personally im only interested if it has the Dune theme on it. Anyone have any insight into licensing, and what set this game apart where the AH reprint couldnt?

looks like this game has the faction asymmetry aspect and looks cool...but with the starting faction decks hard to find on ebay and obtuse rules requiring multiple players...i think i have to pass on trying to get into this despite my love of the novels...


I'll add to Merric's post that I think the proliferation of Dune stuff in the 1990s was in part due to the franchise being sort of sidelined after the Lynch film failed and Herbert died. The success of the new books has raised its stock.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean Chick (Formerly Paul O'Sullivan)
United States
New Orleans
Louisiana
flag msg tools
designer
Fag an bealac! Riam nar druid ar sbarin lann! Cuimhnigidh ar Luimnech agus feall na Sassonach! Erin go Bragh! Remember Ireland and Fontenoy!
badge
Well, I'm afraid it'll have to wait. Whatever it was, I'm sure it was better than my plan to get out of this by pretending to be mad. I mean, who would have noticed another madman round here?
mbmbmbmbmb
MerricB wrote:
Dune has had a number of game adaptations over the years - the Avalon Hill game, the computer game, and this CCG. The CCG was produced by Last Unicorn Games - a company of great designers and lousy developers - who, towards the end of their existence, decided to put out a Dune role-playing game.


Glad you mentioned this. I actually played a session of the Dune RPG back in 2002.

Quote:
The CCG had come out in 1997, and had a troubled history. Its original rarity system was problematic, the Rolling Thunder release schedule was worse (eventually, Rolling Thunder would be reinvented by FFG with their LCG concept and work a *lot* better), and so in 1998 the CCG was cancelled.


How was the original rarity system problematic?

Quote:
...and it doesn't take much to guess that there were licensing issues. Last Unicorn Games should have been able to put out the game on their own. And, since 2001, there have been no Dune games in any format.


So who has the licensing rights? Isn't Last Unicorn effectively dead at this point?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Merric Blackman
Australia
Waubra
Victoria
flag msg tools
designer
Ramping up my reviewing.
badge
Happily playing games for many, many years.
mbmbmbmbmb
gittes wrote:
How was the original rarity system problematic?


Not all cards could be gained in the boosters; the Imperial (character) cards only came in the starters. But most of the cards were fixed, and it was Really, Really Unlikely you'd get the really good Personality cards - in particular, Piter. Who was a beating and a half.

(25 random imperial cards; I think 2 came per starter).

So you had to buy a bunch of extra starters that you didn't actually want.

Quote:
...and it doesn't take much to guess that there were licensing issues. Last Unicorn Games should have been able to put out the game on their own. And, since 2001, there have been no Dune games in any format.


So who has the licensing rights? Isn't Last Unicorn effectively dead at this point?[/q]

After Wizards bought LUG, the game rights were renegotiated, and the Herberts (or whoever) put a HUGE price on the RPG rights. Wizards decided not to pay the money, and that was that.

I have this suspicion that whoever holds the Dune game rights overvalues them massively. (Hint: If no-one's making a Dune game, you've put too high a price on them). Or hates games. Who holds them? You might get an idea of you check a Dune rulebook - it should have the info there. Alas, mine are packed away at present.

I *think* I have a complete set of Eye of the Storm. I know I don't of the expansions, as I only got back into the game later.

Cheers,
Merric
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean Chick (Formerly Paul O'Sullivan)
United States
New Orleans
Louisiana
flag msg tools
designer
Fag an bealac! Riam nar druid ar sbarin lann! Cuimhnigidh ar Luimnech agus feall na Sassonach! Erin go Bragh! Remember Ireland and Fontenoy!
badge
Well, I'm afraid it'll have to wait. Whatever it was, I'm sure it was better than my plan to get out of this by pretending to be mad. I mean, who would have noticed another madman round here?
mbmbmbmbmb
MerricB wrote:
gittes wrote:
How was the original rarity system problematic?


Not all cards could be gained in the boosters; the Imperial (character) cards only came in the starters. But most of the cards were fixed, and it was Really, Really Unlikely you'd get the really good Personality cards - in particular, Piter. Who was a beating and a half.

(25 random imperial cards; I think 2 came per starter).


Good point. This shocked me when I bought some booster packs and failed to get the likes of Piter or Liscia.

Quote:
I have this suspicion that whoever holds the Dune game rights overvalues them massively. (Hint: If no-one's making a Dune game, you've put too high a price on them). Or hates games. Who holds them? You might get an idea of you check a Dune rulebook - it should have the info there. Alas, mine are packed away at present.

I *think* I have a complete set of Eye of the Storm. I know I don't of the expansions, as I only got back into the game later.

Cheers,
Merric


Last I saw it said Dino De Laurentiis on the rulebook but it might have been sold after 1997. I figure when the new books took off they decided their property was hot and asked for too much money. It is a silly strategy since by turning down such projects you fail to gain both money and exposure

Quote:
I *think* I have a complete set of Eye of the Storm. I know I don't of the expansions, as I only got back into the game later.


I don't have many Thunder at Twilight cards. Judge of the Change was divided into three chapters. About 10 boosters packs from each chapter covers most of the cards although you still need starters.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Darrell Hanning
United States
Jacksonville
Florida
flag msg tools
We will meet at the Hour of Scampering.
mbmbmbmbmb
gittes wrote:
2001 was a hit in 1968, and Dune is by definition a flop, both critically and financially. Harlan Ellison thought it was because critics were denied advanced screenings. Then there is the fact that the film is strange and yet it was marketed for children. I have the toys which might be the best thing LJN ever did..


2001 was not a hit in 1968 - I was going to see movies at that point in time. While some critics were saying great things about it, more critics were saying bad things about it, and - after the original curiosity about the movie, and word-of-mouth had set in - the film did not do well at the box office. Most who watched it did not understand it, and found it plodding, dull, and confusing, and this is what they told their friends. (I remember a lot of this dicussion at the time, and most of it was clearly negative.) As a cinematic work of science fiction, it is undoubtedly epic, but as an engaging movie for the common viewer, it was an abysmal failure.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean Chick (Formerly Paul O'Sullivan)
United States
New Orleans
Louisiana
flag msg tools
designer
Fag an bealac! Riam nar druid ar sbarin lann! Cuimhnigidh ar Luimnech agus feall na Sassonach! Erin go Bragh! Remember Ireland and Fontenoy!
badge
Well, I'm afraid it'll have to wait. Whatever it was, I'm sure it was better than my plan to get out of this by pretending to be mad. I mean, who would have noticed another madman round here?
mbmbmbmbmb
DarrellKH wrote:
gittes wrote:
2001 was a hit in 1968, and Dune is by definition a flop, both critically and financially. Harlan Ellison thought it was because critics were denied advanced screenings. Then there is the fact that the film is strange and yet it was marketed for children. I have the toys which might be the best thing LJN ever did..


2001 was not a hit in 1968 - I was going to see movies at that point in time. While some critics were saying great things about it, more critics were saying bad things about it, and - after the original curiosity about the movie, and word-of-mouth had set in - the film did not do well at the box office. Most who watched it did not understand it, and found it plodding, dull, and confusing, and this is what they told their friends. (I remember a lot of this dicussion at the time, and most of it was clearly negative.) As a cinematic work of science fiction, it is undoubtedly epic, but as an engaging movie for the common viewer, it was an abysmal failure.


I know 2001 got mixed reviews, but it was nominated for several awards and was financially successful (I read it was popular with people who took LSD). You can say it was not heralded as a classic but it certainly was not a flop, although I exaggerated in calling it a hit. Sure, it bored the average moviegoer, but it still does. Most of the people I know find it dull and quite a few loath 2001.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Darrell Hanning
United States
Jacksonville
Florida
flag msg tools
We will meet at the Hour of Scampering.
mbmbmbmbmb
gittes wrote:
I know 2001 got mixed reviews, but it was nominated for several awards and was financially successful (I read it was popular with people who took LSD). You can say it was not heralded as a classic but it certainly was not a flop, although I exaggerated in calling it a hit. Sure, it bored the average moviegoer, but it still does. Most of the people I know find it dull and quite a few loath 2001.


Awards for technical merit, yes. (And yet, Planet of the Apes won the award for best costumes - not 2001 for its Australopithecus. Go figure.) But think about it - "financial success" and "bored the average moviegoer" are mutually exclusive, in most cases.

I believe it was only after re-release years afterwards, and after VHS sales, that 2001 finally, actually turned a profit. (Cornering the LSD crowd does not a financial boon make.)
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean Chick (Formerly Paul O'Sullivan)
United States
New Orleans
Louisiana
flag msg tools
designer
Fag an bealac! Riam nar druid ar sbarin lann! Cuimhnigidh ar Luimnech agus feall na Sassonach! Erin go Bragh! Remember Ireland and Fontenoy!
badge
Well, I'm afraid it'll have to wait. Whatever it was, I'm sure it was better than my plan to get out of this by pretending to be mad. I mean, who would have noticed another madman round here?
mbmbmbmbmb
DarrellKH wrote:
gittes wrote:
I know 2001 got mixed reviews, but it was nominated for several awards and was financially successful (I read it was popular with people who took LSD). You can say it was not heralded as a classic but it certainly was not a flop, although I exaggerated in calling it a hit. Sure, it bored the average moviegoer, but it still does. Most of the people I know find it dull and quite a few loath 2001.


Awards for technical merit, yes. (And yet, Planet of the Apes won the award for best costumes - not 2001 for its Australopithecus. Go figure.) But think about it - "financial success" and "bored the average moviegoer" are mutually exclusive, in most cases.

I believe it was only after re-release years afterwards, and after VHS sales, that 2001 finally, actually turned a profit. (Cornering the LSD crowd does not a financial boon make.)


What I remember reading a long time ago (certain errors to follow) is that its first run was a flop. One of the MGM executives was fired over it. Then it got discovered by the drug crowd. I think John Lennon said it was the best thing to watch on drugs, and the film did well. It also helped that we were soon going to the moon. Another example is that the highest rated Second Doctor story was The Moonbase. 2001 made over $50,000,000 according to box office mojo and had a budget of about 10,000,000. However, I'm dead certain that if it was released at any other time it would have flopped.

But you are right. It was not called a classic in 1968.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Stephen Radcliffe
Australia
Victoria
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I still have some of these cards around. I seem to remember vacuuming up all the Guild characters from my friends in short order, then losing interest as Piter de Vries knifed my poor Navigators again and again. I don't think we got very far in terms of exploring the strategy, but some of the card balance seemed off. I was impressed that there was a card called "Pogrom" though, and the cards look nice.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean Chick (Formerly Paul O'Sullivan)
United States
New Orleans
Louisiana
flag msg tools
designer
Fag an bealac! Riam nar druid ar sbarin lann! Cuimhnigidh ar Luimnech agus feall na Sassonach! Erin go Bragh! Remember Ireland and Fontenoy!
badge
Well, I'm afraid it'll have to wait. Whatever it was, I'm sure it was better than my plan to get out of this by pretending to be mad. I mean, who would have noticed another madman round here?
mbmbmbmbmb
SabreOfParadise wrote:
I still have some of these cards around. I seem to remember vacuuming up all the Guild characters from my friends in short order, then losing interest as Piter de Vries knifed my poor Navigators again and again. I don't think we got very far in terms of exploring the strategy, but some of the card balance seemed off. I was impressed that there was a card called "Pogrom" though, and the cards look nice.


I heard there are a few "broken" cards but that seems to plague all CCGs. Was Piter easier to control in multiplayer games?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Lloyd Krassner
United States
Palm Coast
Florida
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
I have a bunch of decks. Beautiful to collect. The play as I recall almost always favored the attacker, whether the attack was arbitration, assassination, duel, or battle, it seemed like whoever initiated the attack would always win.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean Chick (Formerly Paul O'Sullivan)
United States
New Orleans
Louisiana
flag msg tools
designer
Fag an bealac! Riam nar druid ar sbarin lann! Cuimhnigidh ar Luimnech agus feall na Sassonach! Erin go Bragh! Remember Ireland and Fontenoy!
badge
Well, I'm afraid it'll have to wait. Whatever it was, I'm sure it was better than my plan to get out of this by pretending to be mad. I mean, who would have noticed another madman round here?
mbmbmbmbmb
Warpspawngames wrote:
I have a bunch of decks. Beautiful to collect. The play as I recall almost always favored the attacker, whether the attack was arbitration, assassination, duel, or battle, it seemed like whoever initiated the attack would always win.


Generally speaking yes, which is what made one on one games dry. With more players attacking is more problematic.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Lloyd Krassner
United States
Palm Coast
Florida
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
You're right. I only ever did play it 2-player. At the time it was hard enuf getting one person to play.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.