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Subject: Design type cards rss

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Steve Kingsbury
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I have 5 cards that are clearly each design type. ON it are a number of colored blocks as well as other icons. What are these cards and what do the blocks signify? There is no mention of them in the rules.

Cheers Steve
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Lo
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Those show you want each design type has for total bonuses and required materials.

For example: the "shoe" (Evening Wear) card has 5 x White. This means in all, there are 5 Evening Wear design cards that need a white cube.

So the cards are really just quick reference cards for you to see at a glance what any one design type might require in cubes or have in bonuses.
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Kevin Hardwick
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I have the same question. What do the various icons on the Design Card mean? They are explained no where in the rules.

The set up rules, as have been mentioned in another thread, are ambiguous and frustrating.

I've been looking forward to playing this game for a long time now--we have been awaiting it eagerly. But the rules are a colossal disappointment. It would be a good thing for someone who knows the game to essay a better English translation and/or a complete revision.

Anyway, aside from the rant, it would be very helpful if someone knowledgeable of the game could provide a break down of the Design Card face. The rules describe the other cards reasonably well, but neglect this one entirely.

Thanks in advance . . .
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Lo
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I'll give it a shot.

The left side of the card is just the image of the outfit. They're colour coded to match the design type. The design types from left to right in the image above are:

Orange: Boho (Bohemian/Hip)
Pink: Children
Purple: Vintage
Green: Sport
Blue: Evening Wear

The right side of the card has all the info. The top has the cubes (material/cloth) required to complete the design. So in the Evening Wear example above, you need one yellow cube and one red cube.

The centre area on the right will always contain a dollar amount. This amount is what is awarded at the end of a fashion show for the completed design. The little "model" icon next to it just indicates that you get the money during the fashion show phase. So in our Evening Wear example above, you'd get $24 if you had a yellow and red cube and showed this dress at the show.

The other icons that could be in this area include:

"Q" - so you get an extra Quality token for this design if you present it at the fashion show.
"T" - you get an extra Trend token for this design if you present it at the fashion show.
"*" - all this means is this design is worth $5 more than a similar design. The price is already incorporated in the displayed value so you don't actually have to worry about it.

In the bottom box, you have the type of clothing. Our example is a dress. You will get an extra Trend token if this matches the icon on your player board.

At the very bottom is the icon for the design type.
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Andrew Bond
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Lowengrin wrote:
In the bottom box, you have the type of clothing. Our example is a dress. You will get an extra Trend token if this matches the icon on your player board.

At the very bottom is the icon for the design type.


I think* the exact terms for these are slightly different. There are five design types in five different styles:

types are: jackets, blouses, dresses, skirts, and trousers
styles are: Boho, Kids (not 'children'), Vintage, Sports, and Evening (based on the names given in the examples in the rules)

The far right card shows a dress (design type) in Evening style.

Otherwise, I think your description is spot on.

*I am not certain, because the rules fail to explain these things at all (they rather assume you already know this)
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Kevin Hardwick
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Followup question:

There are two sets of five cards each that so far as I can tell are not mentioned in the rules.

One set shows what I infer is a "style" icon at the top, and then a set of six materials cubes, each with a number associated. At the bottom of the card are a set of icons showing what I assume are profit symbols.

The second set consists of five green cards, each with a single symbol on it. The symbol appears to denote a style of clothing--trousers, skirt, dress, blouse, and sweater.

What is the purpose of these card sets? Do they have a use during the game, and if so, what is it?

Thanks . . .
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Kevin Hardwick
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Wow. Fast responses. My partner and I are in the process of trying to figure out the game right now, so I can't express my gratitude sufficiently. Many thanks!
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Andrew Bond
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KRHardwick wrote:
There are two sets of five cards each that so far as I can tell are not mentioned in the rules


I was baffled by these to begin with, but someone has explained what they are on another thread here in BGG. To save you looking for those threads, here are the answers.

KRHardwick wrote:
One set shows what I infer is a "style" icon at the top, and then a set of six materials cubes, each with a number associated. At the bottom of the card are a set of icons showing what I assume are profit symbols.


These are just player aids and shown how many cubes are needed to complete ALL the design types in the indicated style. Note that there are 10 designs in each style (2 of each type, i.e. 2 x dress, 2 x skirt, etc). The symbols along the bottom show the number of Qs and Ts awarded in that style (the money symbol shows how many extra-profitable design types there are - the ones with * on them).

The cards help you to decide what materials to purchase if you are targeting just that style.

KRHardwick wrote:
The second set consists of five green cards, each with a single symbol on it. The symbol appears to denote a style of clothing--trousers, skirt, dress, blouse, and sweater.


These cards are used in the game (they are not just aids). They go with the 'With Freelance Design' contract and give you a second design type that you specialize in (and therefore get a Trend token when you obtain that design type).

So, say you specialize in Trousers. You pick up 'With Freelance Design' and choose Jackets. While that contract is in force, you get a T token on any Trouser or Jacket you lay down.

I hope this helps. Also, check out my threads 'X Questions on Buildings / Employees / Contracts', which pose further questions on this game - some of which have been answered already by more experienced players than me.

More answers there are welcome!
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Andrew Bond
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KRHardwick wrote:
Wow. Fast responses


The wonder of the web - but it allows games like Pret-a-Porter a chance to survive, whereas once upon a time they would have bitten the dust owing tho their (perceived) complexity.
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geocentrix wrote:
KRHardwick wrote:
There are two sets of five cards each that so far as I can tell are not mentioned in the rules


I was baffled by these to begin with, but someone has explained what they are on another thread here in BGG. To save you looking for those threads, here are the answers.

KRHardwick wrote:
One set shows what I infer is a "style" icon at the top, and then a set of six materials cubes, each with a number associated. At the bottom of the card are a set of icons showing what I assume are profit symbols.


These are just player aids and shown how many cubes are needed to complete ALL the design types in the indicated style. Note that there are 10 designs in each style (2 of each type, i.e. 2 x dress, 2 x skirt, etc). The symbols along the bottom show the number of Qs and Ts awarded in that style (the money symbol shows how many extra-profitable design types there are - the ones with * on them).

The cards help you to decide what materials to purchase if you are targeting just that style.

KRHardwick wrote:
The second set consists of five green cards, each with a single symbol on it. The symbol appears to denote a style of clothing--trousers, skirt, dress, blouse, and sweater.


These cards are used in the game (they are not just aids). They go with the 'With Freelance Design' contract and give you a second design type that you specialize in (and therefore get a Trend token when you obtain that design type).

So, say you specialize in Trousers. You pick up 'With Freelance Design' and choose Jackets. While that contract is in force, you get a T token on any Trouser or Jacket you lay down.

I hope this helps. Also, check out my threads 'X Questions on Buildings / Employees / Contracts', which pose further questions on this game - some of which have been answered already by more experienced players than me.

More answers there are welcome!

Wow! Thanks, as these were the answers to precisely the questions I was looking for AND that were answered without me even having to ask them! It because of this, BGG kind of rocks.
 
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geocentrix wrote:
KRHardwick wrote:
Wow. Fast responses


The wonder of the web - but it allows games like Pret-a-Porter a chance to survive, whereas once upon a time they would have bitten the dust owing tho their (perceived) complexity.

Yeah, and for people to try it despite its "odd" theme. But that goes for a lot of games around here, whether they be based on farming, stock manipulation, manufacturing, dinosaurs, or what have you. It encourages designers to branch out into new areas, because they can see what was done before, or to try to create their own version of a game set in genre X.
 
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