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Subject: Who controls a trick when a Crown is cancelled? rss

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Kenny VenOsdel
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I'm playing this game off the rules in the first edition Decktet book so if there is an update somewhere please forgive me.

The book states that when an ace and a crown are in the same suit the crown is essentially canceled. That is, its rank is considered lower than that ace. It doesn't matter if the ace or crown is played first, the effect is the same.

So when there is a crown in a suit, and another player plays say a seven which is then followed by the ace, does the person who played the seven take control of the trick?

We assumed it would revert to whoever played the highest card to that trick. We only played with 3 so it wasn't hard to remember who played what though I can see that being harder for some people to track. If it is hard for you to track I could see giving every player a few tokens to place on their card in a trick if it is the highest, non-crown, in the trick.
 
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Lacombe
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Suddenly a shot rang out! A door slammed. The maid screamed. Suddenly a pirate ship appeared on the horizon! While millions of people were starving, the king lived in luxury. Meanwhile, on a small farm in Kansas, a boy was growing up.
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There's no such thing as "controlling" a trick apart from having it physically in front of you. The key action in the game is taking / moving a trick from somewhere else to in front of yourself. This only happens, per the rules, when you play a card to a trick that is as high as the current high card in the trick. No memory or complicated tracking is required; this is the only time / way a trick can move. Full stop.
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Kenny VenOsdel
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NateStraight wrote:
There's no such thing as "controlling" a trick apart from having it physically in front of you. The key action in the game is taking / moving a trick from somewhere else to in front of yourself. This only happens, per the rules, when you play a card to a trick that is as high as the current high card in the trick. No memory or complicated tracking is required; this is the only time / way a trick can move. Full stop.


Gotcha. I guess I read into that a little bit in the rulebook. Certainly changes things but not in a huge way. Unfortunately I think it makes it a little less interesting. I really liked the idea of leading a crown while the ace is "at large" and other players having to really think about playing something there or not since their card could end up being the highest.

Consider the situation where I lead a crown and hold the ace, hoping to play it to cancel my crown. The other players have the opportunity to then play two cards, switching the suit out so that my ace can't be played and my plan is foiled.

Oh well though. I'll play the right way and if I don't like it as much then it's a variant! It seems like I keep inadvertently creating those with the way I interpret the Decktet rules. :)
 
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P.D. Magnus
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Nate correctly explains the rule.

One reason for the rule is that there is no record of who played which card. So reverting to whoever had played the highest number ranked card could lead to head-scratching and confusion.

kvenosdel wrote:

Consider the situation where I lead a crown and hold the ace, hoping to play it to cancel my crown. The other players have the opportunity to then play two cards, switching the suit out so that my ace can't be played and my plan is foiled.


Note that sometimes you will start a new trick when no one else or only one other player will get to play on it before you do. Save the gambit for such an occasion.

(If you lead the Crown and someone else plays a 9 on it, then it will stay in front of you. Even when you play the Ace, the 9 will be the high card. So you'll probably be stuck with the trick. So - if anyone is going to be able to play on it - it is better to lead the Ace planning to drop the Crown on it later.)
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