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Subject: Castles of Burgundy v. Trajan - The Same or Different? rss

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Kurt FromVirginia
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I posted a discussion on the perceived similarities of Trajan (also by Stefan Feld) to Castles of Burgundy on the Trajan game page:

Trajan v. Castles of Burgundy - The Same or Different?

Would appreciate any thoughts should you wish to jump over...
 
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Overland Park
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Same game, different name.

In all seriousness, these games are very different. Many people like one and not the other and vice versa.
 
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Kurt FromVirginia
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I've played CoB, and have read the rules for Trajan. Like them both, curious if others find these to be too similar to warrant keeping both in a collection.
 
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Ben Verhaevert
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Having played both of them, they feel completely different to me.
CoB sticks more together as a whole whereas T is more of 6 different games set together. The plrinciple of play mancala against dice is totally different.

In my feel you got more control in Trajan than in CoB where your whole fate depends on the throwing of the dice.

CoB has a natural flow whereas the symtem in Trajan is not so "fluent" sometimes a round passes slowly, sometimes it can go tremendously quick.

I also would label TRajan a bit heavier than CoB.

But I think both games deserve a place in a well equipped boardgame closet.

Ben
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Pasvik -
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I own and played both games a lot: They are completely (!!!!!) different, except beeing Euro-games and are designed by Stefan Feld. I never got it. How should they are at all be comparable. Different mechanic(s), different theme (uuups, which theme ? - lets say: different setting), different time scale, different turn order and so on. They are both great, great games, with a total different game-feeling. Once somebody here compared Macao to Castles of Burgundy. How? Just because in both games you first have to store things you take on your players mat before placing them? Its like comparing Agricola with Carcassonne just because you have to place meeples/workers. Please. No comparison!


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Remus Rhymus
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I think that this situation absolutely requires
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a really futile and stupid gesture be done on somebody's part!
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I own them both and haven't played CoB yet. Based on the rules they seem completely different to me.
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Stephen Shaw
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Ive played both quite a bit, and they are both terrific games. Trajan may be my current favorite. They are little alike. Their only similarities are three-fold:

1) Players develop their own games and score points through independent directions of strategy (sometimes disaffectionately termed 'multiplayer solitaire'). The player interaction is largely through denying the other players' board opportunities.

2) Both games have as their central strategy the maximization of actions/abilities during your turn.

3) Both games afford for a variety of actions and multiple different strategies of victory.

Die Burgen is substantially lighter. The dice determine your actions, to a certain degree, but I disagree with the above post that the game is luck-driven. There is more than one way to mitigate die-rolling luck, and I would say that the game is MOSTLY skill-driven. One builds up his barony through development of his land, affording different methodologies of amplifying turn efficiency and growth. Down time is minimized, and there are multiple different paths to maximize points.

Trajan has a truly unique mechanic in the mancala. Through the analysis of your own mancala, this feels like a much heavier game. Skill is gained through experience in ply analysis, trying to see multiple turns ahead in your mancala. There are many opportunities to make your turn more efficient by garnering multiple actions instead of just one. Each player gains points through the development of the Roman Empire, and you can win via multiple mechanisms: resource collection and shipping, conquering Gaul and Brittania, advancing in the senate, building in the city, and taking the advantages the forum has to offer. At the end of each 1/4 game, you must satisfy the peoples' demands or lose points. End-game scoring, in some games and with some strategies more prevalent than in others, is through senate-acquired advantages and construction in Rome.

With these two games, Stefan Feld has suddenly become a favorite designer. Try them both!
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Mark Embley
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I've played CoB and have seen enough information on Trajan to know they play very well, but very different...

The only comonality I see is that neither are currently available in the U.S.! shake
 
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Ron Z
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Trajan does not have a U.S. distributor, but CoB is definitely available, e.g. Boards and Bits has it.
 
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Taylor Nakamoto
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After 3 games of Trajan, I was ready to commit to liking it more than CoB. Then I played CoB again. Maybe I should run for President.
 
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