Recommend
26 
 Thumb up
 Hide
35 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Gaming Related » General Gaming

Subject: This could have interesting implications for gamers rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Moshe Callen
Israel
Jerusalem
flag msg tools
designer
ἄνδρα μοι ἔννεπε, μοῦσα, πολύτροπον, ὃς μάλα πολλὰ/ πλάγχθη, ἐπεὶ Τροίης ἱερὸν πτολίεθρον ἔπερσεν./...
badge
μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος/ οὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί᾽ Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε᾽ ἔθηκε,/...
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
On the BBC News site today, I saw the linked article about marketing a 3D printer which produces plastic objects to general consumers.

For the purposes of this discussions, let's imagine that within a decade the price of these devices (now about US$1750) goes down by at least a factor of ten. The same for the $50 cartridges. The designs for objects must according to the manufacturer's site be freely distributed and they have a file-sharing site for these.

Imagine the impact for people wanting to design their own games, sure, but also imagine the impact for getting replacement pieces. Right now, for example, a good Ameritrash game will cost $100 or so in many cases. Now imagine that a company sells the rules and the board and includes files for printing the pieces. Cost of shipping and of games goes down dramatically-- both for publisher and consumer.

Yes ,of course, business models will need to adapt to the new technology. Given that, what do people think?
16 
 Thumb up
1.01
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Aaron Morgan
United States
Sacramento
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: This could have interesting implications for gammers
3D printers have come a very long way in just the last few years. Print and Play gaming is going to be AMAZING in a few more.
13 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Stijn
Belgium
Antwerpen
Vlaanderen
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: This could have interesting implications for gammers
I doubt it'll be used by the big publishers in the near future. Sure, one can never tell what'll happen a decade in the future, we'll see.

It brings a whole new 'dimension' to print and play though
4 
 Thumb up
0.02
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Was George Orwell an Optimist?
United States
Corvallis
Oregon
flag msg tools
Abdullah Ibrahim - African River
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: This could have interesting implications for gammers
For Christmas this year, one of my sons-in-law gave me an ornament which he had designed in Autocad and created with a 3D printer.
15 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
norman rule
United States
Columbia
Maryland
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: This could have interesting implications for gammers
Soeverein wrote:
I doubt it'll be used by the big publishers in the near future.


I agree.

Even with shipping, low cost injection molded plastic will still be cheaper for the consumer to buy than printing (for example) a complete set of pieces for Risk.

Small publishers, however, might benefit from the economics in several ways. Small runs are always more expensive to produce per piece.... and smaller companies may have fewer resources to cover the costs up front. By shifting that cost to the player, the cost of the game could go down dramatically.

Regardless of the size of the publisher, though, I think that promos and custom pieces (you want your meeples in WHAT color???) will be a big print at home market.
9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ken Waters
United States
Aloha to
Oregon
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
Re: This could have interesting implications for gammers
whac3 wrote:
Now imagine that a company sells the rules and the board and includes files for printing the pieces.


This is a step in the right direction for sure. What would really interest me would be a company that designed a game with a 3D board, and provided a print file with a way to randomize the board each time you printed it. I can envision lots of innovations in game design once 3D boards become commonplace.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean Shaw
United States
Idaho
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: This could have interesting implications for gammers
I think it could be innovative for Print and Play games, especially those with low plastic amounts...such as a dice game or such.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Yggdrasil
Canada
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb
Re: This could have interesting implications for gammers
http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=gammer&defid=...


Lucky gammers!
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Walker Schlundt
United States
Buford
Georgia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I would totally invest in one of these as a Co-op thing and have people send me the pieces they wanted...even at 2k USD a printer in each of the four quads of the US and a few in Europe would cover nearly the entire player base...

I'd have to really research it, but shoot if after a year it paid for itself I'd spend the 2k right now just to have it
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Moshe Callen
Israel
Jerusalem
flag msg tools
designer
ἄνδρα μοι ἔννεπε, μοῦσα, πολύτροπον, ὃς μάλα πολλὰ/ πλάγχθη, ἐπεὶ Τροίης ἱερὸν πτολίεθρον ἔπερσεν./...
badge
μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος/ οὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί᾽ Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε᾽ ἔθηκε,/...
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
GreyLord wrote:
I think it could be innovative for Print and Play games, especially those with low plastic amounts...such as a dice game or such.

Yeah, I expect that just as printing entire books is often more expense than just buying the book so also games with lots of plastic pieces like ameritrash will be cheaper to buy ready made. There will be a range though where printing pieces is in fact cheaper or comparable.

Still, I think even for Ameritrash it will lead to a ceiling for games. Why pay $100 for a set of 200 minis if I can print those minis for $50?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matt Riddle
United States
Oxford
Michigan
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
3D printing has come along way but the price of cartridges has not changed much. the cartridges are not "technology" they are materials. The cost doesnt drop in teh same way technology does. the price of the machine is really irrelevant as the cost in time of operation.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Moshe Callen
Israel
Jerusalem
flag msg tools
designer
ἄνδρα μοι ἔννεπε, μοῦσα, πολύτροπον, ὃς μάλα πολλὰ/ πλάγχθη, ἐπεὶ Τροίης ἱερὸν πτολίεθρον ἔπερσεν./...
badge
μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος/ οὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί᾽ Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε᾽ ἔθηκε,/...
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
riddlen wrote:
3D printing has come along way but the price of cartridges has not changed much. the cartridges are not "technology" they are materials. The cost doesnt drop in teh same way technology does. the price of the machine is really irrelevant as the cost in time of operation.

True but imagine if the materials' market grows exponentially. If the supply doesn't increase to match, it will become expensive but if the supply also scales then it will likely decrease the per item cost.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mike Clarke
Canada
Port Coquitlam
B.C.
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Sphere wrote:
For Christmas this year, one of my sons-in-law gave me an ornament which he had designed in Autocad and created with a 3D printer.


Having seen it, do you think the technology has the kind of gaming potential being discussed here?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Daniel Cassar
Australia
Adelaide
South Australia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
There is already a printable version of Settlers of catan available for the makerbot via makerbots thingiverse website as well as a few Dominion card holders and other bits.



It might be worth while for larger gaming clubs to purchase one.

I was thinking about it for a while... but I would rather purchase 40 $50 games than spend $2000 on a machine to make a bunch of game pieces.

It will be interesting to see just where the technology goes. There is already one that is designed to recycle, so you shove it bits of plastic from say old army men toys and it melts it and uses the recycled plastic to print your objects.

There are also crude looking ones like the Huxley that can be built for under $800
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Samo Oleami
Slovenia
Ljubljana
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm connected to a group of hacker/artists who made one from open source programs and components for about 1000 eur I think and use its prints for various other projects.

But from what I've seen the components are still a bit crude and should be painted to really make it as a boardgame pieces. Other options still seem simpler and cheaper (painting over bought wooden pieces, or even sculpting).
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Samo Oleami
Slovenia
Ljubljana
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
djcassar wrote:
I was thinking about it for a while... but I would rather purchase 40 $50 games than spend $2000 on a machine to make a bunch of game pieces.

this!

I think this makes more sense for a company playtesting games.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Moshe Callen
Israel
Jerusalem
flag msg tools
designer
ἄνδρα μοι ἔννεπε, μοῦσα, πολύτροπον, ὃς μάλα πολλὰ/ πλάγχθη, ἐπεὶ Τροίης ἱερὸν πτολίεθρον ἔπερσεν./...
badge
μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος/ οὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί᾽ Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε᾽ ἔθηκε,/...
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
djcassar wrote:
There is already a printable version of Settlers of catan available for the makerbot via makerbots thingiverse website as well as a few Dominion card holders and other bits.



It might be worth while for larger gaming clubs to purchase one.

I was thinking about it for a while... but I would rather purchase 40 $50 games than spend $2000 on a machine to make a bunch of game pieces.

It will be interesting to see just where the technology goes. There is already one that is designed to recycle, so you shove it bits of plastic from say old army men toys and it melts it and uses the recycled plastic to print your objects.


Could I say take old plastic soda bottles and toss them in? E.g., I drink a fair bit of Coke, more than I should except it helps my sinuses for some reason. It'd be clear plastic but could I for example use it to make pieces for a traditional abstract I'm printing out?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bwian, just
United States
Longmont
Colorado
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
There was a Kickstarter project recently for a low-resolution printer, for about $500. (Printrbot) Even that was more than I was willing to spend, but the prices do keep coming down.

I'm less clear on raw materials dropping much, though. The Printrbot uses ABS plastic, but I'll bet the entire run doesn't amount to one hour's worth of Lego production.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jean-marc Thibault
United States
California
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
This could be the Napster of board games.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matt Riddle
United States
Oxford
Michigan
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Lord_Licorice wrote:
This could be the Napster of board games.


no it will still cost money. less maybe.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dan
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
mrorwell wrote:
Even with shipping, low cost injection molded plastic will still be cheaper for the consumer to buy than printing (for example) a complete set of pieces for Risk.


I completely agree with this. For the past year, I have been submitting 3D print jobs to my work place machine shop and understand the expense, time, and effort for both small parts (2cm or less) and medium parts (15cm roughly). Their equipment is fairly new (and in my opinion, advanced) and would see that molded injection is far better for production and distribution.

3D printing is perfect for proof-of-concept work.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Freelance Police
United States
Palo Alto
California
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hmmm...

Offhand, 3D printing would be great for OOP parts for whatevers that are costlier to replace than the cost of the 3D printing. For example, we had a missing knob for an oven in a rental unit. Since we couldn't find a replacement knob (and the oven was old), we ended up replacing the *entire* oven.

Are there games like that? Maybe. I know games cannot be published in a "bling" edition without high costs. For example, many BGG'er wanted painted mini's for the D&D boardgames. If 3D "color" printing becomes cheaper than hand-painting, then there you go.

A better example would be custom miniatures for roleplaying games. RPG'ers constantly have to substitute mini's. Would a D&D player pay $5 to $10 for a "painted" miniature of *exactly* his character that he's using for a campaign? Well, it's certainly cheaper and less work than tracking down the right miniature *and* finding a high quality painter to paint it.

I'd expect that mini's sculpts would be the first objects for 3D printing, especially if it were in "color". We see from the GW market that miniatures players are willing to shell out a *lot* of money for a miniature. Go to GW's website, customize your miniature, then go to your not-so-FLGWS to pick up your printed miniature. And while you're in the store, perhaps you'll be interested in one of their other GW products...
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Was George Orwell an Optimist?
United States
Corvallis
Oregon
flag msg tools
Abdullah Ibrahim - African River
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
mikecl wrote:
Sphere wrote:
For Christmas this year, one of my sons-in-law gave me an ornament which he had designed in Autocad and created with a 3D printer.


Having seen it, do you think the technology has the kind of gaming potential being discussed here?

Eventually, but I don't see it any time soon.

First, there's the 3D modeling to worry about. Not a lot of people are going to get up to speed in Autocad, and without that you're going to have to buy the designs.

Second, even if you've got a design, you're going to be buying a 2 pound chunk of plastic at Staples to run through your printer, as opposed to a Chinese factory which is buying it by the ton and whipping out 100,000 pieces in bulk. I think it's going to cost you more per unit produced, even forgetting the cost of buying the printer.

Sure, some people will be happy to crank out their own meeples for double the price they could buy them from an etailer, but I don't see it having a big impact on game sales in the near future.

BTW, rest of the story on the ornament:

We live in Oregon, and my son is a (sadly misguided) Duck fan, while I'm a Beaver believer. The ornament was a nasty yellow textured Oregon 'O'. I hung it on the back of my tree, a bit less than waist high. Seemed like the right place for it. Symbolic, if you catch my drift. devil
(All in good fun; we get along great, but aren't above pulling each other's chains.)


6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Berthold Nüchter
Germany
Duisburg
NRW
flag msg tools
I am the walrus
badge
checkpoint
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Interesting playing pieces for board games are already being offered.
see here for example:

http://www.shapeways.com/model/286707/
http://www.shapeways.com/model/300106/
http://www.shapeways.com/model/313233/

The surface of these miniatures is rougher than the surface of casted pewter miniatures, but 3D-printing makes it possible to produce small numbers of miniatures for a decent price if there are no similiar pewter miniatures available.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
norman rule
United States
Columbia
Maryland
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Yes, Shapeways is doing something like that.

I don't see it getting to the level of ArtsCow any time soon, but it's certainly a start!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.