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Johnny Big Bird
United States
Manassas
Virginia
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Why did I Buy it
Rich Uncle Pennybags (the Monopoly guy) is on the box cover and on the board and cards. That and the name of the game positively influenced my decision to buy the game. I thought perhaps the game was shorter improved version of Monopoly. No such luck (or curse).

Art
Very nice art work on the non-playing part of the board. It has drawings/paintings of various beach goers along the Atlantic City Boardwalk. The board itself has basic depictions of the hotel properties and the boardwalk is divided into spaces representing the players’ point (in $ million) totals.

Components
The components are better than average. The player movement pieces are (in the spirit of Monopoly) interesting shapes rather than generic tokens. They are plastic depictions of a sail boat, a baby carriage, a skate, and a motorcycle (which when turned upside down looks to me like a squirrel. I prefer to play with the squirrel, but my kids always want to be the motorcycle piece!) The fortune cards and hotel ownership cards are just basic cards. The hotel pieces are much bigger than the hotel pieces in Monopoly and as a bonus (as pointed out by K_I_T http://boardgamegeek.com/image/570371/cant-stop can double as exact duplicates for the Can’t Stop! pieces.

Instructions
Excellent since they are short and clear.

Mechanics
Dice rolls determine if and limit where you can place hotel tiles and give the player the total maximum value of the hotel spaces that can be covered with tiles. There are multiple choices of where to play tiles (with multiple implications) which makes the game interesting for those who like decision-making in their games. If you roll an F on one of the dice, you simply pick a Fortune Card (which are all good) instead of playing tiles. After playing tiles player scoring tokens are adjusted which may give you and/or another player a Fortune Card. Then you get to play one Fortune Card (readjusting the scoring tokens again, etc.) It is then the next player’s turn. The last round of the game can be triggered by a player running out of pieces. Here again is another interesting decision. If you are losing, you may not want to play your last piece, hoping at catch up by simply playing a Fortune Card.

Complexity
Rules are easy to learn but the game will take some mathematical thought to understand the implications of decisions. To put it another way, this game has some mathematical decisions which can be made by a fifth grader; but I doubt they will see all of the consequences without many repeated plays. Same goes for end of game decisions.

Luck
Moderate to high amount of luck since all choices are based on die rolls, but there is some strategy and decision-making that will affect game play outcomes.

Strategy and Tactics
Not going to go into the various strategy and tactics of the game. Suffice it to say that there are a number of tactical and strategic decisions that have to be made on most turns when you do not roll an F.

Playing Time
30 minutes with three players and less with two players.

Set up Time
1 minute to choose and place tokens and cards and grab your hotels (assuming you have them sorted -- otherwise set up time is doubled).

Pace
Fast moving although there is a little bit of thought after each roll of the dice to determine where to put your hotels, whether to play a Fortune Card, and if so which one to play.

Critical Pieces
Not really. If you buy this game and lose a piece or two, no big deal, as long as it is not the special die with colors and F and W on it. It is a six-sided die so even it is replaceable. Just have one be a Fortune Card, two be red, three be blue, four be yellow, five be green, and six be Wild. I got several extra hotel pieces with my game.

Solitaire
Not ideal, but if you like mathematical problems you could certainly play this solitaire and have a grand time.

Can your Fifth-grader or Non-gamer Spouse or GF Beat You?
Yes. If you play all out and cutthroat it would be harder for the Fifth-grader, et al. to beat you. If you play nice they can beat you most of the time. Bottom line a player’s actions do affect who wins this game, but do not completely determine it. Lady Luck plays a role.

Replayability
Yes, to an extent until you figure out all of the tactics and strategies (which is why I did not want to tell you what they were.)

Value
Very Good. The game is not great by any means, but is easy to learn, quick to set up and play, does have interesting decisions and strategy and tactics to consider, and is inexpensive to purchase.

Overall Rating
5.0. I could take it or leave it when compared to my other games; so that is my rating for whether I would want to play it with one of my adult gaming buddies. Can’t imagine I would. Do I play it? Yes. It does get play because my fifth and seventh graders do like it and it does help them learn math and decision-making concepts. I would rather play a fair game that my kids like, rather than no game at all. My kids would rate it a 6 or 7, but generally kids do not get to rate games on BGG.
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United States
Dearborn Heights
Michigan
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I loved this game as a kid.
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Bill Eldard
United States
Burke
Virginia
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Excellent, Bird. Thanks.
 
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