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Subject: New to trading and what is a "math trade" rss

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Hype Buster
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Hi,

I have a good collection of games and some of them didnt conquer my heart and group nights. I have few games that look brand new and only got played 2-3 times. What is the best way to trade games with others?

And what is a "math trade" ?
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Damian
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Enfield
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A math trade is where a bunch of people offer up what they would like to trade. Everyone then checks out the other items and decides what they would like to receive and what they would trade for it. A computer program takes all these wants/haves and calculates the chain of trades leading to the greatest possible number of items traded. You never know exactly what you're going to receive, or even if you'll trade anything at all, but you know that if you do it will be something you'd want. It allows trades where no two people would want to trade with each other, but since everyone in the group has something someone else wants it can all work out.

You can read more in depth here.
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Kevin B. Smith
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Damian described it pretty well.

There may be (and usually are) multiple chains, where a to b to c to d to a, and e to f to g to e, and even sometimes h to and from i. (I would use arrows but BGG chokes on less-than signs in posts).

There are 2 main kinds of math trades: no-ship, and "normal". With no-ship trades, everyone agrees to gather in a room at a set time and exchange the games. This is great to avoid shipping, but there are usually few participants and therefore fewer games.

In a normal trade, each person (generally) agrees to pay to ship out their games, so you don't (generally) have to pay for shipping of games you receive. Some math trades have over 3000 items available, so it can be very fun (and time-consuming) looking through them all to see what you might want.

Math trades can be confusing at first, but after you have done one or two they are quite simple. They have started doing "mock" math trades now, where you can go through the whole process to see how it works, but then at the end nobody actually ships anything.

If you want to do individual trades, BGG has some tools that let you look for people who want what you have and have what you want. The consensus is that it is best to send geekmail first, proposing a trade, rather than to start by generating an official trade proposal in the trade manager. You can start by checking the "For Trade" box on any game you are open to trading away. Someone might see that and propose a trade with you, without you having to do anything else.
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いい竹やぶだ!

South Euclid
Ohio
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Quote:
There may be (and usually are) multiple chains, where a → b → c → d → a, and e → f → g → e, and even sometimes h ↔ i.

Unicode FTW!
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Ian Klinck
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Or, to put it another way, a Math Trade is a way of figuring out how to put a bunch of people in a circle, get them all to pass their game one to the right, and have everyone come away happy!
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Hype Buster
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Ok thanks for the answers. And with math trades, lets say i would not mind to give away a game that worth 80$ retail value but obviously for something that worth relatively the same on retail, is it possible?

tx
 
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