Nate K
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Re: Generic Vs Archetype in Collectable variations.
The nice thing about Archetypes is that they can drive creativity. "Oh, you're going to put me into this little box because I play red, will you? Well, I'll just make a deck that focuses on this! Didn't see that coming, did you?!" Players like to break the mold and find new ways to express old ideas. That's why in RPGs you see a lot of repentant vampires or educated barbarians. Gamers want to turn things on their heads.
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Sturv Tafvherd
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Re: Generic Vs Archetype in Collectable variations.
What exactly do you mean about "Collectable"?
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Nate K
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Re: Generic Vs Archetype in Customisable variations.
3XXXDDD wrote:
kurthl33t wrote:
The nice thing about Archetypes is that they can drive creativity. "Oh, you're going to put me into this little box because I play red, will you? Well, I'll just make a deck that focuses on this! Didn't see that coming, did you?!" Players like to break the mold and find new ways to express old ideas. That's why in RPGs you see a lot of repentant vampires or educated barbarians. Gamers want to turn things on their heads.


While I understand the reasoning behind this, I also feel it is somewhat debatable, wouldn't putting players into a box give an improper representation of the games ability to be "customized?"



There are a lot of customizable games out there that utilize archetypes. Magic: The Gathering. Warhammer 40,000 (fifth edition). BattleTech CCG. All of these games give you some restrictions. As Mark Rosewater (game designer for Wizards of the Coast) says, "Restrictions breed creativity."

When a player sits down to write up a list for Warhammer 40K, they say, "All right, I want to make an Imperial Guard list, but what kind of Imperial Guard army should I build?" When a player builds an MTG deck, they say, "I want to use this combination of cards/this kind of strategy. What cards will reinforce that strategy?"

If you give someone an entire pantry of food and say, "Make something delicious," they're going to have a hard time deciding what to make. But if you give them a restriction, "Make a delicious breakfast food," or "Make a delicious chicken dinner," then those restrictions will help focus and guide their creativity.

If you hand a player a pile of cards and say, "You can make whatever you want!" they'll have a hard time focusing the deck. On the other hand, if you say, "Purple decks are good at X, Y, and Z, while yellow decks tend to do D, E, and F," then players can focus their strategies and themes better, while still exerting creative control.

That's the theory, anyway.
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Re: Generic Vs Archetype in Customisable variations.
kurthl33t wrote:
Players like to break the mold and find new ways to express old ideas. That's why in RPGs you see a lot of repentant vampires or educated barbarians. Gamers want to turn things on their heads.


Yup!

To the OP: if you haven't read the following thread (link below), you might find some parts of the discussion interesting. Just ignore the argumentative-sounding stuff, there's a lot of insight being shared in between the lines.

Anyone interested in a game with 7920 class/race combinations?
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