Ryan Tullis
United States
Orlando
Florida
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I started thinking about this when I was playing Dominion online with friends the other day. While I had a good time, and despite all the great conveniences of not shuffling, I still prefer in person play. In fact, I'd only play a digital version of a game if there are no opportunities for in person play.

To some of you this probably warrants a "duh." But I've seen many deck builder players who don't seem to ever want to to touch a card again because of shuffling, or mention how they have 100's of plays with an iOS version but have very little interest in the card board original.

The thing is, to me, if I'm going to play a digital game, I'm going to play one of those "video games" I keep hearing so much about like Street Fighter Third Strike or fill-in-the-blank.

But, overall, the function of a computerized board game, to me, is always this: I don't have anyone to play with around so I'll settle for playing on my phone/computer. In fact, I often feel like playing with the Android or Windows version is practice for when I play in person. The game otherwise, especially without people, is just its mechanics and a computer.

Now, I WILL concede here: I'm 24. I don't have arthritis or other physical disabilities that might complicate my comfort level while shuffling or moving wooden pieces around.

So let's end it with a poll!

Poll
Do you prefer playing deck builders/many-components games on the physical copy or on the computer/phone program providing you have the option of doing either?
Cardboard
Computer/Phone
      64 answers
Poll created by Tryken


Finally, I should note again, I do own board games on my Android phone, and it's perfect for playing through hands of Euchre and now Tichu at *cough* work *cough*. I also play Dominion on BoardGameArena if I'm home bored (and I really hope they'll add Ascension so I can play it more). My argument is that card games are better in person, and that the physical work of shuffling and dealing, while sometimes agitating, add an extra sense "touch" into the mix, as well as the joy of human interaction that online can't fully replicate, because, value wise, card/board games is a journey and experience we get to share with one another.



P.S. Or maybe I'm just jealous because there aren't many board games on Android. laugh
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Myles Wallace
United States
Columbus
Ohio
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For me the whole point of gaming is to spend time with other people. Digital versions of games don't even come close to delivering the satisfaction of in-person plays, but they're better than nothing.
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Dan Patriss
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North Carolina
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There are plenty of card games I would rather play in person, dominion being a perfect example. However, it all depends on the game and set up time and play of said game. Also, it depends on how much "multi-player solitaire" a deckbuilder/card game is as well.

Couple of examples...

Dominion-- I would rather play it in person b/c there is a certain table feel to it, and I like to pay more attention to what people are buying. It's a lot harder to do on line when playing it. Granted, that's just MY thoughts on it, I know the Dominion experts out there will say it doesn't matter what anyone else does they play their style and that's all, and there is nothing wrong with that.

Ascension-- I LOVE LOVE LOVE the iPad version. And yes I play a few games every day vs AI. But that's just because I don't have real life partners to play it with all the time. Parenting and work... damn them... always get in the way of gaming BUT given a choice I would much rather have the cards in front of me and play it. Especially that the new expansion is not out yet on ios (Hurry up wil you!!!).

Thunderstone--- Another game I simply love. But, it's quite tedious to set up in person. Especially considering the many many expansions that are out there. So, if given a choice, and if ALL expansions were available online i would MUCH rather play this one online.

I guess all in all I would kinda agree that there's nothing like the feel of the cards in your hand, and the interaction between all players at the table with these games. But in this world where I know I have way too many responsibilities and only get to play on avg, once a week in a group, I take my games any way I can get it, so online or apps, are a necessity.
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Curt Carpenter
United States
Kirkland
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I've come to the point where I just won't play any deck-builders in person. I never did buy Domain, because I much preferred BSW's implementation. I do play iPhone version a fair bit. A game takes maybe 10 minutes. If I'm going to play face to face, I want a different experience. And there's not enough player interaction in a game like Dominion (base game at least) to warrant the 4x time to play in person.

I did buy Thunderstone, everything from base to Dragonspire, when that came out, thinking it would be great for my son and me. It was ok, but we quickly stopped playing because it's just too tedious to deal with all the selection of which stuff to use, finding the stuff, setting it all up, resorting and restuffing everything at the end. Ugh. I sold it all. And the constant shuffling all the time. No thanks.
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Betty Egan
Canada
Halifax
Nova Scotia
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horripilated333 wrote:
For me the whole point of gaming is to spend time with other people. Digital versions of games don't even come close to delivering the satisfaction of in-person plays, but they're better than nothing.


My thoughts, exactly.
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Patar Absurdus the Shananigator
United States
Carrollton
TX
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"Gird Up Your Loins, Like a Man!" ~God to Job
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"We're put on this earth to do a job. And each of us gets the time we get to do it. And when this life is over and you stand in front of the Lord... Well, you try tellin' him it was all some Frenchman's joke." ~Betsy Solverson
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Totally agree. I like the ability to practice and learn a games in's and out's in a computer or iOS version but the ultimate goal is to play with people using physical components. The added cost/set up time are well worth the advantages IMHO.

I do enjoy the software versions though. They can offer a nice tutorial (a much smoother way to learn games than reading the rules), a great way to practice, a way to play anytime, a different experience (graphics and music) than a physical board game, and a way to play games that you might not get to the table very often.

I am glad that they exist but there is something special about cardboard in hand. cool
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Daryl Wilks
United States
Peshastin
Washington
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Most games I'd rather play the physical version, but deck builders are the only type of game I'd much rather play digitally.

Playing with others is, of course the point, but you can play any digital game with friends on an ipad. Especially nice in a coffee shop, bar, car, etc, where a board is not practical. They can actually facilitate more games played. Still, I'd rather have the real thing. Except with deck builders.
 
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For me, it's about the game and the social experience. If it were just about the game, I'd be content with staying at home play offline games, with a bit online. If it were just about the social experience, then games like Apples To Apples and Werewolf would be fun. Instead, they bore me out of my skull 5 to 10 minutes later when the novelties of such games wear off.


For the former, satisfying cravings for dbg on elec. format leaves me more time to enjoy other games that aren't in elc. format. Furthermore, I do enjoy elec. imlementations of games since I can learn more rules, try other strategies, and do so without the time and effort of lugging around boxes of cards and setting things up. Plus, not having to play through an entire sitting in one go has its advantages. Truly, many of our dbg haven't gotten much play recently since bringing in a gazillion Dom cards was taking up too much space in game bags and/or were getting too heavy for some.

For the latter, I do enjoy the time between games, catching up on gossip, both boardgame related and non-boardgame related. We typically try to keep gameplay going, but do inject banter, strategy discussions, and rules questions, which is the nice thing about f2f play (not that doing this stuff on BGG is awful, I still enjoy having you guys around for that )


EDIT: clarifications
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Spencer Taylor
United States
Spanish Fork
Utah
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horripilated333 wrote:
For me the whole point of gaming is to spend time with other people. Digital versions of games don't even come close to delivering the satisfaction of in-person plays, but they're better than nothing.


Dead on. Half the fun of baordgaming is the social aspect, and as far as I'm concerned chatting online just doesn't cut it compared to sitting across the table from someone.
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Gary Clarkson
United States
Watertown
NEW YORK
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BettyEgan wrote:
horripilated333 wrote:
For me the whole point of gaming is to spend time with other people. Digital versions of games don't even come close to delivering the satisfaction of in-person plays, but they're better than nothing.


My thoughts, exactly.


+1 for this!
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James Sitz
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Illinois
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I agree.

I miss shuffling and talking.
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