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Subject: Question on some house rules rss

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Don D.
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louper wrote:
Learned from a couple friends who have played more than I have and had already instituted some house rules. I'd like other experienced players' opinions, as I plan on getting the game when it's reprinted and introducing it to new players. (I generally dislike house rules, but these seem... reasonable.)

1. Policemen are allowed to move up to 2 spaces and then look for clues or make arrests or move 3 spaces and not look for clues nor make arrests. (This seems similar to the "Rushing" variant, but not quite, as Rushing seems to essentially allow one policeman to sacrifice his turn to let another move 3 spaces AND search, if I'm reading it correctly.)

2. Each policeman token must be moved and cannot end its turn on the space on which it started. (A second policeman may end where the first started, effectively, taking the first one's place.)

3. On the final night, Jack cannot return to his hideout with his very first move. Obviously, this is only possible if his hideout is adjacent to the murder scene. (This is similar to the "Catch Me If You Can" variant except that Jack IS allowed to choose murder scenes and their adjacent spaces as hideouts; he's just restricted from returning to it too quickly on the final night.)

4. At the end of night 4, the detectives can announce a total of ONE location of Jack's hideout; if they are correct, they win. (Again, similar to a variant, "I Know Your Address," but always done at the END of the game, rather than when Swanson or Abberline is the head of investigation.)

Any thoughts on these house rules or the closely-related variants from the rulebook? (In the games I've played, Jack has won twice and lost once, with these house rules in effect.) Thanks in advance.



#1,3, and 4 are all reasonable. For #1, I use a third move as an additional possible action for each police officer, which does make a major difference compared to your rule as it allows for greater tactical flexibility for the police. Police not originally thought to be wanting to make an extra move will often find themselves wanting to make that third move AFTER another investigator finds a particular clue.

For #3 I use a variation that is not much different. We simply play that if jack goes home on move 1 of night 4, the investigators still get a turn of moves and actions and can win with an arrest.

I do not use #4 though it is perfectly reasonable.

#2 is a REALLY bad idea. I can't emphasize enough how bad of an idea that is. That variant would tactically handcuff the investigators in an incredibly arbitrary manner and would situationally imbalance the game. Jack needs no help with house rules and this one could be a game winner for jack in many instances. Forgetting a night 4 cordon, there are many times during other nights when an investigators best move is to stay put.
 
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Don D.
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louper wrote:
dond80 wrote:
#1,3, and 4 are all reasonable. For #1, I use a third move as an additional possible action for each police officer, which does make a major difference compared to your rule as it allows for greater tactical flexibility for the police. Police not originally thought to be wanting to make an extra move will often find themselves wanting to make that third move AFTER another investigator finds a particular clue.


Thanks for the thoughts! I have a question, though, about your reasoning for your third move variant. It sounds like you're letting each policeman move and search for clues before the next policeman moves. My interpretation of the rules is that ALL the policemen move and then they ALL search for clues after movement is complete. Playing that way removes the possibility that a clue could influence a policeman's movement (at least until after Jack has had the opportunity to move again).

Am I mis-interpreting how you play, mis-interpreting how the game should be played, or helping you discover that you've been playing by an unintended "house rule"? whistle


You are misinterpreting how i play (which is how the official third move b
Variant works). The police still operate in the everyone moves, everyone takes actions manner, its that one of the possible actions is now move one space. The way you play forces each investigator to decide whether to take the third move action before the moving step for police begins.
 
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Don D.
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louper wrote:
Just to be clear on how your rule works:

1. All the policemen move 0, 1, or 2 spaces.

2. Then, policemen execute actions, which includes the option to move a third space.

The way I was taught forces detectives to choose to move 3 spaces before any clues for the round are searched for, whereas yours allows them to move the 3rd space AFTER clues are searched for. Right?

If a policeman chooses to move a third space in the "execute actions" part of the turn, is that the only action you allow them to take?

Thanks for clarifying!


You are correct in your understanding of how it works. Your way is much more limiting. When I was in the stages of exploring how to unbreak the game (or rebalance it to a reasonable and playable balance if you prefer) I tried dozens of variants including the moving one your group uses. I found that it just didn't make a significant enough impact. It was used for the first one or two moves of each night by one or two out of place detectives then rarely after that on each night. It was not the tactical tool the police needed to shift the balance in a meaningful way.
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