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Subject: Any ideas to make this into a 6 player game? rss

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Wrinkly Mann
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I know this is a bit of a shot in the dark, but has anybody got any ideas how to make it into a multiplayer game?
I've told lots of people how good this game is as a two player game, and it got me thinking if more people could be introduced into one game.
Thanks for any ideas.
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Ken Dilloo
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The Ginger Ninja
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Two guys play, one shuffles cards, one places US influence, one places USSR influence, one puts all played cards in the discard, and one transfers the played China card on a silver platter

I kid, although this seems like a long-shot, it would be interesting to see what people come up with.

Edit: looks like I did you one better, and made it a 7-P
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Wrinkly Mann
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You've made me curious. 7 is even better. How do you do it?
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Adam Cirone
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I cannot remember if I have posted this before, and I have never tried it myself, but I think this idea would work:

1. Divide into 2 teams, US and USSR.

2. Each game turn, each team elects one of its players to serve as president. The remaining players make up the national legislature/committee.

3. Only the committee players get to look at the hand for their nation during each game turn. The president is left a little in the dark.

4. Each headline phase and action round, the committee decides (by whatever method they choose) which card will be played. They give that card to the president, who then decides how to implement the chosen card (influence, coup attempt, event, etc.).

5. Each player must be elected president once before someone can be elected for a second term.

6. (Optional) The China Card can always be played by the president in place of the card selected by the committee.

If anyone tries this out, please let me know how it works.
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Matt Anderson
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Ellensburg
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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

I like it
 
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David Boeren
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How to make Twilight Struggle a 6 player game:

1. Buy 3 copies of the game.
2. Profit!
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Oliver Paul
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dboeren wrote:
How to make Twilight Struggle a 6 player game:

1. Buy 3 copies of the game.
2. Profit!


Yeah, doing a round robin style tournament with 3 games going on at once sounds more fun than dividing a single game into 6 players
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177ark
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I know it's not what you were getting at but what about, 2 play early game, 2 play mid game and 2 play late game? It would have a bit of realism, think of it as the new president inheriting your predecessors mess. But you'll need another game to occupy the other 4 while they're not playing...
 
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David Boeren
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The game may be over before the late players get to do anything though.
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Tylor Hobbs
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Heck, if things go really badly, the Mid War folks may not even see action. Though I suppose in that case you could just rotate and start a new game with the Mid War guys taking the Mid War and the guys who already played moving to the Late War.
 
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Derry Salewski
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Buy Virgin Queen or Here I Stand?
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Conan Meriadoc
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Divide into teams :

- 3 players play the Pentagon War Room (one of them is a spy)
- 3 players play the Soviet Leaders (one of them is a spy)

Decisions on what to play are taken by majority, at least two players must agree on a move to take.There are microphones and spy devices everywhere, so any discussion is public.

Each team has a player that's secretely working for the other camp (use secret Role cards from another game, e.g. The Resistance). Their goal is to have the other team win, by any means available. They can "accidently" reveal information when discussing strategies, or advise sub-optimal plays.

If a spy is found/suspected, the two other players can agree to send him/her back to the other team, in which case they act as a normal member of the committee afterwards.
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John Griffey
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Reds and Blues are dealt 11 cards on turns 1-3, and 12 cards thereafter. There are 9 Action Rounds turns 1-3, 10 Action Rounds thereafter.

After Blue plays, the Nonaligned player plays 2 OPS at the end of each Action Round. He can play 2 OPS to remove 1 IP from a USSR or USA controlled country, or to remove any 2 IPs from non-controlled countries. He can also make two Realignment rolls for 1 OPS each, with each country free of IPs counting as under his control.

The Nonaligned player wins if neither Red nor Blue makes 20 VP, and if neither Red nor Blue has a score of 10 or better at the end of the tenth turn.
 
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S Forrester
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Okay. Let's start with the obvious--this game is brilliant!

As a teacher of history, I have been searching for a way to familiarize my students (all born post-1989 these days!) with the Cold War in a way that helps them to get a sense of what was at stake and what the tension of the times was really like. Lectures don't cut it--it remains as distant as the Middle Ages. So I thought, why not a Cold War game that would put them IN the midst of the events.

Skip over months of searching, wracking my brain and scheming...enter Twilight Struggle. This game, I think to myself, I can make work. Now, let me begin by saying that I make no claims to "improving" the game. I don't see that it NEEDS improvement. There are basically two goals I had in mind in making changes: 1) I want to TEACH the students particular historical events along side game play; and 2) I need to get 10-12 kids involved in this, so here's what I came up with.

I added a modified version of the Arms Race track proposed by J Griffey in this post http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/831079/arms-race-track-c... because this is an important component of the teaching element. (I skipped his Level 9 and modified some VPs downwards.) I also added a few new Event Cards: David Benito Richard's "KGB Created," "Age-Old Foes," "Berlin Wall," and "Bay of Pigs" posted here http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/689514/tear-down-whose-w..., as well as one of my own: "Reagan Elected," which acts as a nullifier of "Iranian Hostage Crisis" and eliminates any US influence in Iran, while giving it 1 in Iraq.

The new rules listed below are intended to get multiple additional players involved and require the creation of two decks of cards (one for US, one for USSR) containing all 84 countries on the map.

If you're inclined to do so, read on and tell me what you'd do to "fix" it! Thanks in advance.

Teams are made up of a Bureau Chief (CIA or KGB) and a number of field Agents. It is the job of the Agents to move about the board in order to advance their nation’s strategic aims. It is the Bureau Chief’s job to play the cards which he and his teammates have selected. If there is disagreement about what cards to play, the Bureau Chief has final say. Teams should work together to deploy a unified strategy to outwit and outmaneuver their opponent.

Agents move about the board a maximum of 2 adjacent spaces per Action round in the Early War; 3 spaces per round in Mid- and Late-War by choosing cards from the deck of Map Cards. there is only one deck per nation, regardless of the number of Agents. Agents place their current location card face-down in front of them creating a trail (a la Fury of Dracula) of up to three cards at a time; on the fourth move, the oldest card is returned to the deck. The lines of political adjacency do not apply to Agent movement (in most instances)—a country is considered adjacent for the purposes of movement if it is geographically adjacent. Movement over sea spaces, however, follows drawn (political) lines.

There are 2 additional limitations to Agent movement: 1) There may never be more than 1 friendly agent [agents from the same nation] in a given country at a time; 2) Agents must maintain a trail of 3 cards, showing their current and previous 2 locations. This effectively means that Agents’ choices for movement are also limited by the previous 2 moves of friendly Agents, as well as their current locations. Agents may at any time choose not to move, i.e. to remain in their current location, by playing a “Safehouse” card. However, it should be remembered that there are only 3 of these cards in the deck. Also, Agents may not double back. i.e. return to a previously visited location until that card becomes available by being removed from the card trail.

In order to stage a Coup, a nation must have Agents in at least 2 politically adjacent countries. In order to attempt Realignment, teams must have at least 1 Agent in the country to be realigned AND outnumber enemy Agents in politically adjacent countries. Agents in the country to be realigned may be counted toward this total.

A nation that has Agents in 3+ enemy-controlled countries AND has more Agents in enemy-controlled countries than their opponent at the end of an Action Phase earns 1 VP. In order to claim the VP, the nation must reveal the location of the relevant Agents. The opposing team may negate the bid for VP by revealing the location of its Agents which nullify the claim, but may choose instead to maintain the secrecy of its Agents and give up the VP. Note: nations need only reveal as many Agents as will prove they have earned the VP.

Enemy Agents may be “outed” by first placing an Agent in the location one suspects may contain an enemy Agent and then rolling a die to “scout” for an Agent. Die rolls of 1-3 are successful in revealing the presence of an enemy Agent (if one is present) and gains +2 VP for the team who exposed him; rolls of 4-6 reveal nothing. In addition, any roll of 6 requires that the friendly Agent leave the country in which he made his rolls and move to an adjacent country. If an enemy Agent is “outed,” he must move to an adjacent country and must declare which country he is going to. He may not move back into the previous country in his trail. If there is no country eligible for his retreat, he must return to base (i.e. he cannot participate any further in the current Action Round and must begin a new trail on his nation’s next Action) and the nation that exposed him gains +3 VP, instead of just +2. All the cards in the “outed”Agent’s trail are returned to the deck. Note: Attempting to “out” an enemy Agent is an implicit exposure of one’s own Agent as players must announce which country they are scouting in.

Phew! Anybody make it this far...? Let me know what you think. If anyone actually read all this and wants to see the cards I created to make it work, I may post them later. Game on!
 
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Wrinkly Mann
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Wow!
Thanks for all the ideas.
 
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-=::) Dante (::=-
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arucuan wrote:
1) I want to TEACH the students particular historical events along side game play; and 2) I need to get 10-12 kids involved in this, so here's what I came up with.


So did you ever get to actually test this variant? If so, how did it go?


Jayne Starlancer wrote:
I cannot remember if I have posted this before, and I have never tried it myself, but I think this idea would work:

1. Divide into 2 teams, US and USSR.

2. Each game turn, each team elects one of its players to serve as president. The remaining players make up the national legislature/committee.

3. Only the committee players get to look at the hand for their nation during each game turn. The president is left a little in the dark.

4. Each headline phase and action round, the committee decides (by whatever method they choose) which card will be played. They give that card to the president, who then decides how to implement the chosen card (influence, coup attempt, event, etc.).

5. Each player must be elected president once before someone can be elected for a second term.

6. (Optional) The China Card can always be played by the president in place of the card selected by the committee.

If anyone tries this out, please let me know how it works.



Adam, someone else gave this a shot but even with only 2 players to a team it took them 6 hours to play! The idea sounds great but I'd love to hear if you (or anyone else that's tried it) have any suggestions that could maintain the general gameplay without dramatically extending the play time.
 
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S Forrester
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I'll be testing it out in May with my students. I'll let you know how it goes. At that time I may also post the changes I made to the board & cards to accommodate the changes in gameplay.
 
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S Forrester
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I recently played the Twilight Struggle variation described above with a class of 15 high school students. The US was a team of 7 students--4 Agents and a CIA bureau of 3. The USSR team is 8 students--4 Agents and a KGB bureau of 4. Bureaus chose which cards to play with the final decision going to the bureau chief. (The CIA chief rotated according to Early, Mid-, and Late-War; the KGB chairman was subject to a confidence vote at the end of each period. Details below.)

Given the classroom/class period limitations, I had to make some accommodations such as making an electronic version of the game board and projecting it on a screen in front of the class for visibility and as a means of saving a record of influence markers and team positions on the various Turn, Space, Arms, and Victory Tracks. (We use the physical board, too, in class, but since it will take several classes to complete a game, the onscreen version is a necessity.)

A few changes in the rules developed during play-testing:
1) Agents always move according to lines of political adjacency; Agent movement is limited to 1 country per Action Round in Rounds 1-3 and 2 countries in Rounds 4-10 (the purpose of this mechanic is to simulate the improvement of technology and air travel in the latter years of the Cold War);
2) As a point of clarification, a card just removed from the trail of an agent at the beginning of an Action Round is not eligible for replay by that Agent in the same Action Round, though other Agents may play the card;
3) Members of the KGB directorate roll 1 die each at the end of each game Turn--any Turn that ends in a net gain of points for USSR grants +1 to the current chairman’s roll; any Turn that ends in a net loss of points for USSR grants +1 to the rolls of each of the other members of the KGB directorate; at the end of each Phase (Early, Mid-, Late-War) directorate members roll their dice--highest total is the new chairman;
4)The means of “outing” enemy Agents was altered a bit to make it somewhat more viable as a strategy worth pursuing: in order to scout for an enemy Agent and expose him, one’s Agent must be in the same Region (Europe, Middle East, etc.) as the Agent being scouted, instead of having to be in the same country;
5) When an Agent is outed and unable to legally “retreat,” he is captured, rather than returning to his home nation; this means he is unable to move or aid his team until a prisoner exchange takes place; this exchange is automatic the next time an Agent of the opposing team is captured.

The addition of Agents for multi-player interaction worked quite well, though admittedly Agents have somewhat less to “do” in each Acton Round than the members of the bureau. The game was at its best when players worked together--Agents and bureau members both--in putting together a strategy and carrying it out. Once players figured out how to use Agents to their advantage, things heated up!

In the interest of full disclosure, we did not have time to complete the entire ten rounds of the game. Teaching on some of the more crucial events along the way took up time, too. However, it was time well-spent and helped to flesh out the reality of events for these students who had no personal experience with the Cold War. Seeing JFK address the Cuban Missile Crisis, Kruschev pounding his shoe at the UN, Sadat’s assassination, or Reagan’s Brandenburg Gate address helped to bring the cards and the era to life.

Also, I think the Agent element, while far from necessary in an already brilliant game, could be well worth playing even in the usual two-person game. It is not overly complicated and lends a certain reality and urgency to trying to sniff out the opponent’s plans, regardless of what cards either side draws. In fact, I’m toying with the idea of making certain cards playable only when certain conditions regarding Agent placement have been met--e.g. in order to play “Fidel” USSR needs to have an agent in Cuba, or outnumbering USSR Agents in Africa prevents the play of “De-Colonization,” etc. (This would require reprinting cards, though, so I’ll perk on that one for a while first.)

In the meantime, I will see about posting the new cards and the changes to the board I made in order to accommodate this variation. Let me know what you think of it all.
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