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1812: The Invasion of Canada» Forums » Sessions

Subject: Two players rss

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James Cacy
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Brighton
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Well, gave the game again with only two players. I must say it's quite an interesting game that way as well. This is my 4th game playing two players. Record: British 3 wins (two not mine), two ties, American's one win. Definitely not "American's win all the time," though I too was once a skeptic that this might be a "heavy American" game.

Last night the British won an overwhelming victory in the first game. 6 to 0. The American's had many brave men die and very few troops flee the field of battle. In the second battle (swapping sides), a tie occurred (I believe 4- 4 or 3- 3).

Both games strategies were much different, due to troop placement during set up, for the second game, the Center of the British homelands were braced heavily. There was also placed a contingent of British troops in the west, to threaten the Americans there.

The natives used the canoes to cross the lakes and conquer Erie and then eventually capture Pittsburgh (for a turn or so). However their Command decision specialty helped them to stay around for much of the game, even so much as to take western territory at the end of the final Round (6 I believe) to help gain enough for the tie. The British retook territory in the east to cut into the American lead. However, the American's had attacked the stronghold of the British center, giving them two points and still held another British homeland.

The first game, the British hammered the American center early and continued a push through the center of Canada using their Natives, to force American reaction and opening areas in the East for the well trained British regulars.

The American's had to "go for broke" in the west and try to invade British homelands. However, they were bloodied beyond repair- as most of the loss was handed in deaths, not fleeing.

A wonderful game! Having fun, can't wait for Nashcon!!!
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Chris Dugas
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Great to hear such a variety of outcomes to your games of this. My husband and I just tried this for the first time this past weekend and are considering getting it. After a couple of hours of fighting (because we were learning it), and a lot of fleeing by both of our completely useless militia, the war ended in a tie. shake So many cubes sacrificed their lives for a tie.
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James Cacy
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Fleeing is awful! However, it's worse when they just die off. You may have 5 troops coming in as "returning troops", plus your normal reinforcements. However, if those troops who fled die off, you only get the reinforcements.

So if I'm going to lose someone I pray they run and not die.

The good news about poor blocks- they can come back and fight again another day.

May I ask- how many turns did yours last? I love the idea of settled peace at any time after the third turn, really means a lot! We played this in a local con, with 5 people, and As the British command, I begged our side to play the truce card as soon as possible (because we had had some great success early and were up a lot to not enough). However, the Native's truce card turned out to be at the bottom of his deck and by the final turn (American's sued for peace) the Americans had brought them "+1."

Jim
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Chris Dugas
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True about the advantage of fleeing versus being killed in battle. It was just that in our game, both the Canadian and American militias seemed to run away more than the statistical 33.3% they should have based on the dice. Our respective militias either had a lot of family or farm obligations to tend to, or were just a bunch of cowards! I actually really liked how the dice were weighted to distinguish between the Regulars, the local militia, and the native troops. Made a lot of sense.

Actually, once we got through the rules, the whole game made a lot of intuitive sense. It seemed to be designed very well in that respect...the differing dice for different troops, the different water movement cards, the special cards. I was playing the Canadian/British/native side and enjoyed the special cards tweaking my memory of high school Canadian history...Sir Isaac Brock, Joseph Brant, Laura Secord, etc. I'll make a point to play the American side next time and pay attention to who is depicted on the special cards for them. The whole Canadian history aspect was one of the things that drew me to the game. (I'm not a huge fan of deck building, so A Few Acres of Snow doesn't have the same kind of appeal.) Heck, we live in southern Ontario and have visited a couple of these forts.

Re number of rounds our game lasted, if I remember rightly the last truce card (another mechanic I liked about the game) got played in the 6th round. My husband knew he would have to play the last truce card in that round (it was his only movement card for either his Regulars or militia, I forget which). He was leading going into that round and was looking forward to winning, but I managed to bring it back to a tie before the end of the round. (Even though I jokingly complained about the tie, I actually liked that it could end in a tie. I have bad memories of long, almost divorce-inspiring games of Risk a gazillion years ago. That this game has multiple outcomes, including a tie, and would be almost impossible to totally eliminate one side, is a plus.)

We both really liked the game and will probably give it one more try at our local games cafe before buying it. Now that we have a handle on the rules, I'm sure it will play much quicker than our first outing.
 
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