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Board Game: 1989: Dawn of Freedom


1989: Dawn of Freedom
A game for 2 players designed by Ted Torgerson (and Jason Matthews)


"What we may be witnessing is not just the end of the Cold War, or the passing of a particular period of post-war history, but the end of history as such: that is, the end point of mankind's ideological evolution and the universalization of Western liberal democracy as the final form of human government."
- Francis Fukuyama, The End of History


Introduction

Hello and welcome to the latest edition of Roger's Reviews. I've been playing board games since I was a wee lad and wargames for over thirty years.

1989: Dawn of Freedom follows in the footsteps, both literally and figuratively of the best selling game from GMT, Twilight Struggle. 1989 covers the events of that tumultuous year as the people of Eastern Europe and the Balkans shook off the shackles of their Communist regimes, with the most visually compelling one being the fall of the Berlin wall, symbol of the Iron Curtain since its erection in 1961.



I was a play tester for this game (I'm even listed in the credits at the back of the rule book) through the wargameroom.com league and have watched the evolution of this game from an early inception to this gorgeous new GMT release. I have also previously reviewed a print and play edition of this game (cf. [Roger's Reviews] 1989: A comprehensive review).

Photos in this review are used with the kind permission from Rui Serrabulho (psicoserra).

Components

GMT has outdone itself with this game, with one of the nicest game boards I've had the pleasure of playing on.

From gallery of leroy43


The colour contrasts for the different countries are clear and clean, the scoring track harkens back to the original Twilight Struggle with the +/- values on the track, the graphics are easy to see and read, and all the symbols are listed in the legend on the board. There are even spaces on the board for some of the key events, and the event tokens themselves are in full colour with artwork to easily distinguish them from one another.

There are two decks of cards in the game: the 110 card event deck split into the early, mid, and late war, and the 52 card power struggle deck for resolving scoring phases in the game. Counters are thick die cut counters with a nice heft and feel, with very clear easy to read large numbers. I might have to get a second set to use with my Twilight Struggle game. Yes, they're that nice.

Board Game: 1989: Dawn of Freedom


Someone went to a lot of effort with the graphic design on this game, and it really shows. The event deck cards are easily sorted by early, mid, and late year by the colour stripe across the top, and the stars tell you whether it's a Communist, Democrat, or rare neutral event. However, in the power struggle cards, while they are suited, in one of those "that seems obvious in hindsight" moments, I feel it would have been really helpful to put the elite, church, and worker symbols on the leader cards. Once you've played the game a few times it's easy to remember that you need to control the church space to use the church leader card, but with everything else so nicely designed with icons, it seems an unfortunate omission.

Did I mention the gorgeous board? Stunning. Really.

Board Game: 1989: Dawn of Freedom
Board Game: 1989: Dawn of Freedom
Board Game: 1989: Dawn of Freedom


Rules & Game Play

Although there are some differences in the final rules, I will refer readers to my old review for the core mechanics and focus on the game play in the GMT edition. As a veteran Twilight Struggle player, I will also comment on some of the core differences between the two games; comparisons between the two are inevitable.

1989 follows the basic premise of the Twilight Struggle game engine. We have a shared deck split between the early, mid, and late year. You can use cards either for operations or events, opponent events in your hand will trigger when you play them, and events with an asterisk on them are removed from the game.

Relative to Twilight Struggle, events in this game are rather more dramatic in effect. For one example, The Legacy of 1968 allows the democrat player to put 1 support point into each and every space in Czechoslovakia that is not communist controlled. There are also more linked events in this game, such as the Sajudis + The Baltic Way + Breakaway Baltic Republics chain that has to be played in order.

Adding to the interesting tension in the game, of the 110 event cards, 90 of them (82%) are starred events, meaning they leave the game when played. In Twilight Struggle that ratio is much closer to half. There are 44 communist events, 14 neutral events usable by either, and 42 democrat events. You spend your events at your peril, but it's even more harrowing to play a 2 ops card that lets your opponent remove 4 of your support points from the board!

The direct consequence of this is that hand management is incredibly fraught with peril. If you play your events, powerful though they may, and your opponent sticks with playing ops, in the reshuffles your hand will be filled with the wrong colour of cards and make your life miserable. I remember one game vividly where I was dominating the board heading into the final turn as the democrat player and receiving a hand of nothing but red events and my game was undone.

The two most dangerous and dynamic aspects of the game are the support check and the scoring phase.

Like Twilight Struggle, you can use ops points to place support points, but 1989 has replaced the coup and realignment actions with the support check. A support check can be made anywhere your opponent has support, can be triggered with any value of operations card, and most nasty of all, can happen in any country on the board because unlike the Twilight Struggle safety net of the DEFCON track that only prevents coups and realignments in specific regions, the board in 1989 is open and in play all the time. This means there's a lot more to keep track of and be conscientious about. And, not only do support checks get to add a +1 bonus for every adjacent city you control, you get to make two rolls, so you can theoretically hit the same space twice with one play of a card.

There are six scoring cards in the game, one each for Poland and Hungary (early year), East Germany, Bulgaria and Czechoslovakia (middle year), and Romania (late year). When a scoring card is played, rather than simply scoring presence/dominance/control like in Twilight Struggle, you're now playing a game of poker with the power struggle phase. The power struggle deck is shuffled, and players get cards based on the number of cities they control. If you control at least one, you get 6 cards, and 2 for every city you control beyond that. If you control no cities in the country in question, well, you're about to get pummeled. Either player may raise the stakes in the outcome by discarding three of their power struggle cards, which will add a cumulative +1 to the die roll once the power struggle is over.

The power struggle begins with the player who used the scoring card. They lead with a card from their hand, which can be a petition, march, strike, rally in the square, or a leader (if they control the right kind of space). Leaders are wild in that they can be used to respond to or initiate any type of card. The other player then must match the suit and rolls a die to see if they can take the initiative by at least matching the number on the card played. A Rally in the Square is always handing the initiative back to your opponent as they all have a value of 1. There are also a handful few wild cards that do things like prevent a suit from played anymore in that struggle ("no more marches for you!") or remove a support point from the country ("no more elite leaders for you since you don't control that space anymore, ha!").

Play continues until someone cannot or chooses not to respond to the play of a card. Once the power struggle is resolved, the victor rolls a die and the result of the die roll determines both how many support points the loser must remove from the country (ouch), and how many victory points the winner earns for coming out on top. If the democrat player won, it's possible that with a high enough roll that the communist player is ousted from power and that scoring card is then removed from the game!

That done, the country is then scored, Twilight Struggle style, for presence/dominance/control.

Assuming the communist player was not ousted from power, they then can choose to either remain in power, or to voluntarily cede power. In the former instance, they score the power value on the scoring card multiplied by the number of times the scoring card has come up; this means you can earn a lot of points in Poland, say, if you can hold on to power and the scoring card comes out multiple times. In the latter instance, the regime becomes democrat and the scoring card is removed from play. The country remains in play for final scoring at the end of the game however, assuming it gets that far.

The decision whether or not to cede power is one of major strategic importance to the communist player. At game end, they earn bonus victory points for the number of countries they still control, but this must be measured against the likelihood of having that country's scoring card coming up again, which in turn will require a commitment of ops points in that country. Voluntarily ceding power on the other hand, allows you to focus your energies elsewhere on the board, and there are many events in the deck that will likely allow you to pillage and plunder the democrat support points. This is, by far, one of the most interesting decisions in the game for the communist player.

For all that there are truly nasty events in the game, there is a safety valve for both players in the Tiananmen Square track, which is analogous to the space race from Twilight Struggle. However, in a brilliant innovation, the track has variable target numbers for both powers to achieve, and any value ops card can be used. Not only that, but players also get to add +1 if they use their own event on the track and if you missed your roll previously, you get +1 on your next attempt. The democrat player has a relatively easy time of it to start, needing only a 5 or better to get on the track, but needs a 10 to get to the final space. The communist player has a peak in the middle, but it gets easier as the track goes on.

There is a lot of incentive built into the Tiananmen Track to invest cards in it too. Just getting onto the track gives you a +1 to future rolls (until your opponent catches up), to making your 1 op cards worth 2, all the way to more powerful effects such as playing an opponent's card without triggering the event or playing your card for both the ops and the event.

Conclusions

I absolutely love this game. Every element in the game makes complete thematic sense from the events on the cards, to the Tiananmen Square track, to the power struggles that follow the scoring cards. Every card is a piece of living memory and the hand management decisions are incredibly thought provoking, and because the entire board is open at every instance of the game, no two games I've played have been alike. You need to be highly responsive to the board state, and be prepared to sacrifice in some places to make headway in others.

This game really is history come alive. I encourage you all to check out and participate in Ted's Discussion Topic: 1989 on the web.

I sometimes wonder what would have happened if 1989 had come out before Twilight Struggle because I might have a different favourite game. With 1989 I may yet.

From gallery of leroy43

Thank you for reading this latest installment of Roger's Reviews. I've been an avid board gamer all my life and a wargamer for over thirty years. I have a strong preference for well designed games that allow players to focus on trying to make good decisions.

Among my favorites I include Twilight Struggle, the Combat Commander Series, the Musket & Pike Battle Series, Julius Caesar, Maria, EastFront, Here I Stand, Napoleon's Triumph and Unhappy King Charles!

You can subscribe to my reviews at this geeklist: [Roger's Reviews] The Complete Collection and I also encourage you to purchase this very stylish microbadge: Microbadge: Roger's Reviews fan
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I absolutely love this game.
Well said! Wonderful review, Roger, worthy to this excellent game!
The game components are truly gorgeous.
One of the biggest challenges for me (among the many) during my games in the WGR was to venture to use Support Checks. Having to roll a die made me hesitant, and I rather chose the safer SPs. On the other hand, many times I would have gotten more points with Support Checks, and could have weakened my opponent.
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leroy43 wrote:
I sometimes wonder what would have happened if 1989 had come out before Twilight Struggle because I might have a different favourite game. With 1989 I may yet.
Wow, that's high praise.

I played 1989 for the first time last night. It's good, but I'm not sure it's TS good. For me, a large part of TS's appeal is the angst, the dread, the terror. And right now it's up in the air whether 1989 can pull those particular strings.
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1989 is angst, dread, and terror in a box with pretty components(and color cards). Comparatively, TS is the Monty Python fish slapping dance. The volatility is much greater than TS because of the event card designs. There seem to be many more cards of near Warsaw Pact or Marshall Plan impact. And if you get behind on the Tienanmen Square track, it SUX.
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garygarison wrote:
leroy43 wrote:
I sometimes wonder what would have happened if 1989 had come out before Twilight Struggle because I might have a different favourite game. With 1989 I may yet.
Wow, that's high praise.

I played 1989 for the first time last night. It's good, but I'm not sure it's TS good. For me, a large part of TS's appeal is the angst, the dread, the terror. And right now it's up in the air whether 1989 can pull those particular strings.
I took to TS like a duck to water. Cold War, strategic, wow. It's still my favorite game.

It took me a while to warm up to 1989. I still don't know off the top of my head where a lot of the places are. "Place 2 SP in Kaopectate. Where the heck is Kaopectate? Oh right, it's in Duodenum, right next to Vagus."

TS, for me, is the classic Ford Mustang. Sleek, sexy, and sometimes you need (and want) to tinker with it (Chinese Civil War, optional cards in the deluxe edition, bidding for influence, ...)

External image


1989, on the other hand, is the new Mustang. Runs great without any need to get under the hood.

External image
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I was roped in as an opponent during Roger's review process and I have to say that I enjoyed 1989 even more than Twilight Struggle.

I thought that the specific focus on Eastern Europe might lessen my immersion in the theme, but I was really surprised by how much fun it was.

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I just realized to my horror that I apparently didn't pre-order this. I know at one point I had it in my 'cart' on GMT's page, but I guess I never completed the transaction! Oh well, I will just wait for it to arrive at my game store.
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leroy43 wrote:

Someone went to a lot of effort with the graphic design on this game
Apart from the box cover.
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Shauneroo wrote:
leroy43 wrote:

Someone went to a lot of effort with the graphic design on this game
Apart from the box cover.
I can only give you a classic gallic shrug on that point. That and the platitude about judging books by their cover.
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Oh, I'm sure it's a great game. I have it on pre-order from a supplier in the UK, I love Twilight Struggle (in fact, I used to be one of the wargameroom clan, and have played yourself many times), but that cover sucks major donkey balls.
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Such lovely cards in tasteful beige. I shed tears for those poor Kickstarters of the new stark white Glory to Rome.

Board Game: 1989: Dawn of Freedom
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My copy is somewhere on its way to me... so might turn up anywhere from tomorrow to three weeks away. Argh!

Great review. Can't wait to play it!

Cheers,
Merric
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garygarison wrote:
Such lovely cards in tasteful beige. I shed tears for those poor Kickstarters of the new stark white Glory to Rome.

Board Game: 1989: Dawn of Freedom
Those are the ArtsCow print and play cards.

These are samples of the actual game cards:

Board Game: 1989: Dawn of Freedom
Board Game: 1989: Dawn of Freedom
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Apart from the box cover.
The box cover reflects very well the official and supported trend in art in those countries; that was called "Socialist Realism".
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leroy43 wrote:
These are samples of the actual game cards
The white balance seems to be off in those shots. Aren't the cards a light beige?
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judoka wrote:
Quote:
Apart from the box cover.
The box cover reflects very well the official and supported trend in art in those countries; that was called "Socialist Realism".
I disagree...

External image


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The white balance seems to be off in those shots. Aren't the cards a light beige?
You are right, Cary, the cards are not that white, but not as beige either as they were in the P&P version.
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Thanks for the great review Roger. Speaking of Looking for Freedom, here is David Frost interviewing David Hasselhoff on the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall.



The best is at the end when the esteemed David Frost says, "And that was The Hoff."

EDIT:
Quote:
However, in the power struggle cards, while they are suited, in one of those "that seems obvious in hindsight" moments, I feel it would have been really helpful to put the elite, church, and worker symbols on the leader cards.
Great idea, if we have a second edition we will do this!
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How does the playtime compare to TS?
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Cole Wehrle wrote:
How does the playtime compare to TS?
About the same. When I introduced HMS to it yesterday, it took about three hours, including the set up and teaching him the game. I clearly taught him too well given the end result...
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Shauneroo wrote:
judoka wrote:
Quote:
Apart from the box cover.
The box cover reflects very well the official and supported trend in art in those countries; that was called "Socialist Realism". ;)
I disagree...
Yes, if anything, the cover is more samizdat than socialist realism.
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Great review Roger. I know that you were so looking forward to this being published. Now that it has and has met your expectations I am happy.

I will be following the FLGS route for this one. I think..... better check my GMT pre-order page. Sometimes I get confused.
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Fantastic review.
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topdeckgames wrote:
1989 is angst, dread, and terror in a box with pretty components(and color cards).
After a second game of 1989, I'm now more convinced that 1989 is indeed a great one.

Quote:
And if you get behind on the Tienanmen Square track, it SUX.
Tell me about it. I failed on the TS rolls five of the first six turns while my opponent failed only once. I still managed to win the game, amazingly.
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Shauneroo wrote:
leroy43 wrote:

Someone went to a lot of effort with the graphic design on this game
Apart from the box cover.
Another instance of diff'rent strokes. I absolutely love the box cover. I'm quite glad that Rodger went with a different style for this one, especially the inclusion of the Solidarność logo. For me, it definitely works.
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