Vaucharwen 30
Australia
St Ives
NSW
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
What I mean by this is games that help children to recognise, discuss, work out solutions to problems like anger, grief, bullying, shyness, and so on.

Some of the available games look to be very good but am not sure.
How much real fun are they?
Do you need to be a trained psychologist or childcare worker to derive any real benefit from them?
Has anyone found them counter-productive?
3 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
John Bobek
United States
Chicago
Illinois
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I haven't used any specific game for that specific purpose, but I have seen the effect with some students who were "socially challenged." Of course, I'm talking about using miniatures. The toys are visually appealing and the students are either in two teams, or all in one against the judge, me. Either way, the role of judge is much like that of an entertainer to engage and entertain the audience. If alert to the social dynamics and prepared to use gentle humor and historical background, it's gratifying to see acceptance and appreciation for contributions develop among kids who would not ordinarily associate with each other.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Darren Bezzant
Canada
Calgary
Alberta
flag msg tools
badge
"Everyone wants to be unique, but no one wants to be different."
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I have two boys with differing degrees of the Autism Spectrum Disorder. I try to use games to teach them basic social skills. (winning/losing without gloating/crying, even just interacting with the other players.)

Some games work better than others, but I haven't tried anything specifically like you mention. I try to keep them light, quick and when possible, cooperative.

I'd be very interested in hearing what you learn.

Darren
"Everyone wants to be Unique. No one wants to be Different."


4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Derry Salewski
United States
Augusta
Maine
flag msg tools
badge
I'm only happy when it rains...
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I had counselors play games with me when I was a kid.

I have a friend who is a child counselor and I know she plays games sometimes with kids.

I think it's more about the interaction than it will ever be about some game design subtly or not so subtly teaching anything specific.

3 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Vaucharwen 30
Australia
St Ives
NSW
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Wargamer204 wrote:
I haven't used any specific game for that specific purpose, but I have seen the effect with some students who were "socially challenged." Of course, I'm talking about using miniatures. The toys are visually appealing and the students are either in two teams, or all in one against the judge, me. Either way, the role of judge is much like that of an entertainer to engage and entertain the audience. If alert to the social dynamics and prepared to use gentle humor and historical background, it's gratifying to see acceptance and appreciation for contributions develop among kids who would not ordinarily associate with each other.

Thanks for this insight John. I can see how this could be tried in a family group situation too. Much appreciated.
3 
 Thumb up
0.25
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Vaucharwen 30
Australia
St Ives
NSW
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
dbezzant wrote:
I have two boys with differing degrees of the Autism Spectrum Disorder. I try to use games to teach them basic social skills. (winning/losing without gloating/crying, even just interacting with the other players.)

Some games work better than others, but I haven't tried anything specifically like you mention. I try to keep them light, quick and when possible, cooperative.

I'd be very interested in hearing what you learn.

Darren
"Everyone wants to be Unique. No one wants to be Different."



Hi Darren, I have been researching for reasons other than autism but my daughter has 2 friends with sons in the autism spectrum and so I did notice a number of games recommended for this. A lot of them were mainstream games rather than the therapeutic games I have asked about. For example,
Arthur's Game
Balancing Moon
Paw Patrol Dog House Bingo Game
Candy Land
Chutes and Ladders (I love that these 2 games get some more praise)
Curious George Nutrition Game
Goodnight Moon
Guesstures
Kids On Stage
Lucky Ducks (I'm assuming this game, as there are 2)
Old Macdonald's Farm Game
Picture Peg
Sequence for Kids
Snail's Pace Race
The Mighty Mouth Game
Trouble
Twister
Yahtzee
See http://www.autismteachingtools.com/page/bbbbgt/bbbbgz
Am not sure whether any of these will be of interest to you as many are for quite young children and I guess the idea re this list of games is to use them in just the ways you are already.

Re 'therapeutic' games in particular, a couple I've come across relevant to Asperger's and Autism are:
Hidden Rules
Figure Me Out Board Game
The Understanding Faces Game

I'll let you know if I discover anything aside from whatever is posted on this forum.


4 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Vaucharwen 30
Australia
St Ives
NSW
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
scifiantihero wrote:

I think it's more about the interaction than it will ever be about some game design subtly or not so subtly teaching anything specific.


Good point. I guess what I've discovered re some of the therapeutic games is that they are said to be carefully designed around questions and topics of particular value to children with social problems. Am not sure how valuable that might be.
2 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Wann
Australia
Western Australia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
My autistic 12y/o is clever enough to realise what the "therapeutic games" are attempting to do and will work the system to his benefit. When my wife or I run through one of these we usually discover that he 'plays' me but not my wife.

I have only recently began to foray into the boardgaming community. I used to play Heroquest and the original Space Hulk as a kid. I have a copy of Space Hulk 3ed.

My son has watched me play a couple of these games with my wife and our gaming friend. He has expressed an interest in playing so we obliged. We hoped by careful guidance and support we could get him to discover that winning isnt everything, its the journey and having fun that matters.

It didnt go well......

Until I got into playing Blood Bowl on my PC. He loves it, the theme the competition all appear to resonate with him (which is funny because he is the least sporting person you can find). I have just started guiding him in playing this game. So far it has appeared to work in that he can now lose without having a major issue with it.

So to sum up, I think its not the game that matters. Its what resonates with the individual child. What game ensnares them, captures thier interest. Then build on that.
3 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Vaucharwen 30
Australia
St Ives
NSW
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Obi Wann wrote:
My autistic 12y/o is clever enough to realise what the "therapeutic games" are attempting to do and will work the system to his benefit. When my wife or I run through one of these we usually discover that he 'plays' me but not my wife.
...
So to sum up, I think its not the game that matters. Its what resonates with the individual child. What game ensnares them, captures thier interest. Then build on that.

Thanks for your insights on this david. Am beginning to think that the therapeutic games will be too structured and obvious for family use, though some of them seem to get high praise from psychologists and teachers.

But am hoping that others who've used them in a family situation might see this forum and add their thoughts before I abandon the idea.

The thing we're wondering about re (therapeutic?)games is whether they might help a small boy to better handle social interaction, frustration, compromise and so on. Normal board and card games have already helped quite a bit but it's a slow process.
2 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.