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Subject: Navia What? Is that something from Avatar? (A Review) rss

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Kevin Outlaw
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This review, along with a whole bunch of pictures, can be found on my blog at AlwaysBoardNeverBoring. Please stop by and say hello.



Navia Dratp (apparently the "t" is silent), is one of those games that I was bound to love. It is a Chess variant that features cool miniatures and multiple paths to victory. What's not to like? Well, there is one major thing not to like. The game is collectable. That means, after you have bought the base set, you need to buy packs of additional figures if you want to explore everything that the game has to offer. Of course, the additional figures are blind packaged, promoting the necessity to spend lots of money to get lots of figures you don't actually need.

Luckily, Navia Dratp managed to avoid some of the pitfalls that most collectable games suffer from, by providing starter sets that provide a full game experience right out of the box. Yes, it is true that if you don't own all the different pieces you can't take full advantage of the rules for drafting your own armies to play with, and you will be missing out on certain elements of the game. And yes, it is true that sometimes you will want to play a certain powerful character but can't because you don't own the right playing piece. However, the two starter set armies are well balanced and lots of fun. Playing with just those pieces will provide endless hours of entertainment, and as long as you aren't playing against someone with the full range of characters to select from, you won't really feel like you are at any particular disadvantage.

For the sake of full disclosure: This game was bought for me by my wonderful wife for a Christmas present years ago. She bought the two separate starter packs, which each contained a Navia (king piece), seven Maseitai (powerful warrior pieces), nine Gulled pieces (like the pawns from Chess, but more powerful), a bunch of plastic crystals (called Gyullas), rules, reference cards, and a board. The game was also available as a two-player set featuring all the contents of the two starters in a single box, and that is definitely the recommended why to pick up a copy.

Although I loved Navia Dratp from the start, I found it difficult to find anyone to play with, and it languished in the back of the games cupboard for years. I recently dusted it off to play against a friend who I have gradually been introducing to board games, and playing it again reminded me what a truly exceptional game it is. This is a game that definitely deserved to be far more successful than it actually was.

If the game is so good, you might be wondering why it didn't do better. I think that comes down to several things. First, it's a collectable game, and that will immediately put people off. Second, it's a Chess variant with simple rules but very deep strategy. The use of the "toys" (plastic miniatures) might have put off serious gamers looking for a deeply strategic game, while the complex strategies and multiple paths to victory might have put off younger players who might otherwise have purchased the game for the cool playing pieces. A third reason is likely to have been all the stupid in-game terms such as "Maseitai," and "Gyullas." People want to play games; they don't want to have to learn a new language just to know what's going on.

However, the biggest reason for the game's failure is probably down to a lack of decent advertising. I never even knew the game existed until it was already out of print, yet as soon as I discovered it, I badgered my wife until she bought it for me.

Anyway, that's enough about why the game didn't succeed; let's talk about why it should have.

The game is framed around Chess, so pieces will move around a grid based on their unique movement styles, and will take enemy pieces by landing on them; but for every similarity to Chess there is a host of really exciting mechanics that make this game fresh and exciting. Each player has a Navia piece (a nicely painted female character who has the power to control the Maseitai), who will start on the board surrounded by Gulled pieces.

The Navia is the most important piece, and if she is ever in a Check Mate position, then you immediately lose. Killing a Navia is one of three unique ways to win the game.

The Gulled pieces come in two flavours. Black Gulled can only move forward one space, and each time they do they earn one Gyullas, which the owner of the Gulled piece will store for later use. Red Gulled can move into any of the three spaces directly in front, and each movement earns three Gyullas. Obviously, the red Gulled are much more powerful, but you only get two of them compared to seven of the black Gulled.

Each player will also have seven beautifully sculpted Maseitai pieces, which begin the game in "The Keep" at the edge of the board. This game was made by Ban-Dai, and their experience in the toy industry shines through in the quality of the Maseitai. They really are some of the finest pieces for a game I have ever seen.

If you are using the pieces from a starter set, your selection of Maseitai has already been made for you. Each starter set contains a good mix of characters with good abilities that work well in combination, so this is definitely a good way to play to begin with. Once you are used to the game (and especially if you pick up some extra pieces), you can add a drafting mechanism to the game where you will select seven Maseitai from the pieces available. Unfortunately, I have never been able to do this, as I only managed to pick up a couple of extra pieces and I am therefore stuck with the pieces from the starter sets. (If anybody has spare Maseitai pieces they are looking to part with, get in contact with me, as I may be interested.)

The reason you will want to mix and match the Maseitai is because they all work differently. Every piece has a compass dial on the front of its base which indicates its movement range. Some pieces can move diagonally, some only forwards or sideways. Some can even move backwards. However, to begin with, no Maseitai can move more than two spaces in any one direction. Now, here's the clever bit: Also printed on the compass face is a Dratp value. By spending Gyullas equal to that value, you can Dratp the piece, which involves spinning the compass 180 degrees so the reverse face is showing. This second face will show a new movement grid or a special power, which the Maseitai can now use.

For example, the powerful tiger Maseitai Agunilyos starts out being able to move a single space in any direction. If you pay 16 Gyullas, you can flip his compass to reveal an extended movement grid that allows him to move an unlimited number of spaces in any direction (the same as the Queen piece in Chess).

The Maseitai Olip starts the game being able to move one space orthogonally. After paying the Dratp cost of four Gyullas, he can still only move one space orthogonally, but at the point he Dratps he can switch the position of any two allies on the battlefield.

My absolute favourite piece is the Gyullas Turtle (who turned up in my review of Gormiti: The Trading Card Game yesterday). This piece has the same movement pattern as a red Gulled piece, but after Dratping, each time he moves he generates six Gyullas (normally, only Gulled pieces can generate Gyullas from moving). This is massively powerful, as Gyullas not only provide the means to Dratp your characters, they also provide the second route to victory: If you ever obtain 60 Gyullas, you can use them to Dratp your Navia piece, which causes you to instantly win the game.

This Dratping mechanism is the heart and soul of the game. Not only is it wonderfully implemented on the pieces, but it also creates a wealth of exciting possibilities in any game. The Dratping cost of each piece also creates amazing balance. The pieces that have the most powerful Dratp abilities have the highest Dratp cost; this means it takes a long time to save up the Gyullas to activate the power, and activating the power will also mean it will take longer for you to accumulate the 60 Gyullas needed to Dratp your Navia. Furthermore, in an interesting twist, whenever a Maseitai is killed by your opponent, your opponent will gain Gyullas equal to the Dratp value of the killed piece (even if the killed piece had not yet Dratp!).

For example, if you bring Agunilyos into play and foolishly allow him to be killed, your opponent will gain 16 Gyullas! If you had already Dratp him at the cost of 16 Gyullas, that would technically put you 32 Gyullas behind, and probably in a position where it would be unlikely you could win. Bear in mind, Agunilyos is really quite weak until he has Dratp, so if you bring him out too early, your opponent could score an easy 16 Gyullas by picking him off.

This system means you really have to think about how you balance your forces. If you put all powerful characters in your army, you will only rarely get to Dratp them; but if you only use Maseitai with low Dratp costs, then you will find yourself facing much stronger opponents who will pin down your movements and make it hard for you to win.

The Dratp mechanism is incredibly clever, and incredibly simple, just like the rest of the rules of the game, which boil down to doing one of the following things on your turn:

1. Move a Gulled piece.
2. Summon one of your Maseitai from The Keep to one of the marked summoning spaces on your side of the board.
3. Move a Maseitai or Navia already on the board, and then Dratp one of your Maseitai.

Summoning a Maseitai to the board is free, but takes up your whole turn, and this creates even more tension and tactical decisions. The Maseitai are your powerful pieces, and you want them in play; but to begin with you will only have a few spaces to summon them to, and you don't want to bring them out until you really need them or they might be killed, gifting your opponent with Gyullas. Also, if you spend each turn bringing out the Maseitai, you will find you do not have enough Gyullas crystals to perform Dratp actions.

A Navia piece can only move one space at a time, and will quite often remain hidden in your back line. However, there is a third route to victory, and that involves running your Navia off your opponent's side of the board. You will only rarely get a chance to win this way, but its nice to have the option.

I really enjoy Chess, and I even collect Chess sets, so this game appeals to me. However (and I may be burned at the stake here), I actually enjoy Navia Dratp more than Chess. It has simple rules, incredible depth of strategy, and beautiful playing pieces. It's an abstract game with multiple paths to victory that also feels totally thematic. Each Maseitai works completely differently, and tinkering with combinations to see how they work together provides endless replayability. It's just a shame Ban-Dai decided to go down the collectable route, as I would love to be able to have a few more Maseitai to pick from.

Of course, you will have realised by now that I have no intentions of kicking this game out of The Vault. It remains one of my all-time favourite two-player games, and a shining example of quality game design.
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Martin Larouche
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RedMonkeyBoy wrote:
and a shining example of quality game design.


I agree... too bad it wasn't a shining example of game marketting.

The fact it was collectible with blind booster packs killed it early i believe.
If it had been a stand-alone boardgame with some fixed expansion packs, people would still talk and play this regularly.

Not a lot of people want to pay 15$ for 3 miniatures when the probability you already have 2 of them is really high...

But yeah... it was a great game.
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Kevin Outlaw
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Yeah - I hate the blind packaging model. As far as I am concerned there is no justifiable reason to ever use it - no game has every been improved by using blind packaging. It is a blatant money grab ploy whenever it's used.

However, in the case of Navia Dratp it was even more annoying than usual. Most games that use blind packaging at least have rules that allow you to make use of all those commons. For example, in Lord of the Rings Tradeable Miniatures Game you could never have too many common orcs to bulk out your army. But in Navia Dratp you can only have one of each Maseitai in each army (two if you are lucky enough to get a coloured version), so there is nothing you can do with all the doubles. Horrible.

It casts an unpleasant shadow over an otherwise exceptional game.
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Jason Birzer
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Unfortunately, it came at a time when TMGs were the rage and everyone wanted to get skin in the game. Most of them ended up not doing much for the reasons you say.

That being said, if it weren't for the model, I'm not sure Navia Dratp would have existed otherwise.
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Daniel B
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RedMonkeyBoy wrote:
However, in the case of Navia Dratp it was even more annoying than usual. Most games that use blind packaging at least have rules that allow you to make use of all those commons.

At least there was no different rarity distribution in Navia Dratp. I got into the game after it died and bought a bunch of boosters. Got a great distribution of figs and could easily trade for the missing ones, so I have no extra commons lying around.
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Deebs wrote:
RedMonkeyBoy wrote:
However, in the case of Navia Dratp it was even more annoying than usual. Most games that use blind packaging at least have rules that allow you to make use of all those commons.

At least there was no different rarity distribution in Navia Dratp. I got into the game after it died and bought a bunch of boosters. Got a great distribution of figs and could easily trade for the missing ones, so I have no extra commons lying around.


True to a certain extent - but I thought the coloured variants were rare chasers. Not that you needed them - but they were definitely put in there (along with the rules for including coloured and non-coloured Maseitai) to feed the addiction of completists.

Congrats on getting a full set!
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Martin Larouche
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Indeed, some miniatures were definitely more rare than others.

When the game was going out... i bought 20 boosters at each the cost of 1$ (the store manager was a friend and he really couldn't sell those anymore).

Out of those 20 boosters, i got 1 painted Navia and one other which had a painted variant of a unit in the second starter set.

I believe a completist would have spend a ridiculous amount of $$$ to get all the painted variants.

And as a side note, with those 20 boosters, i was still missing 3 masetai and 1 navia... I can't even begin to understand how much $$$ would've been needed to get a complete set from boosters alone. Each booster was sold at 15$. So if i bought those 20 at "regular price" instead of only 1$, i would've spent 300$ on boosters alone, not even counting the two base sets.
And it's not even a full set... with only "1" painted masetai.

If "EBAY" is the only answer to get a full set... yuk. And that's for a game which had what? 40 different miniatures?

The sad part of all that is that the game itself was pretty good. It's the casualty of the distribution model really.
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I'll add to the chorus. I think it was and is an excellent game and well worth havimng a copy. You'll probably have to teach it to your friends, but if they like abstracts you should be able to egt it on the table every so ofetn.

I think it was amde a collctible largely because, as was mentioned, that's what everybody was doing at the time. As it turned out, everybody was wromng, because very few collectible format games really did well. It's unfortunate in this case, because there's no real handle to hang the collectibility around. There are no heroes, very large pieces, unusually powerful pices, etc. The game inherently includes a balancing mechasim as indicated in the review, so you don't need rarity to enhance it.

I think the unnecessarily odd and tongue-twisting terminology was also a big factor.

On the other hand, with the starters and a relatively small number of pieces from the boosters you have all you need for a complete and playable game thjat you can play with your friends.
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The business model was definitely a misfire, but I do want to reiterate something for anyone who has read this review and might be interested in getting into this game. I did mention it in the review, but it bears repeating - this game doesn't FEEL like a collectable game. If you buy the two-player starter set, you have a complete and wonderful game to play, that will provide endless entertainment. Don't be put off by the difficulty in acquiring extra pieces, because you will never really feel like the game NEEDS those extra pieces (unless you have ever played Chess and thought, I wish I had more Bishops... Hold on, I always feel like I need more Bishops, usually because mine are dead). It's nice to have more pieces, but it isn't essential to the enjoyment of the game, unlike some other collectable games, like Magic: The Gathering.

The two starter set armies are wonderfully balanced and interesting, and with 14 Maseitai you can still do drafting to a limited extent (although someone will be lumbered with that bloody rabbit woman). The starter set is also still quite readily available for not a whole lot of cash.

I did think it might be good if a company like Fantasy Flight Games got hold of the rights to this game. With their Living Card Game format, and their high production quality, I think they could do wonders (as long as they left the rules untouched!). Releasing a couple of premium pieces every month would keep collectors happy, and it would feel a bit more natural.

Oh well...
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RedMonkeyBoy wrote:
But in Navia Dratp you can only have one of each Maseitai in each army (two if you are lucky enough to get a coloured version), so there is nothing you can do with all the doubles.

That rule about being able to use both a painted and an unpainted maseitai is the thing that bugged me most. That puts you in the position where you don't really have a complete set from a playability perspective unless you have both painted and unpainted figures of every type.

I had no real difficulties getting all the unpainted maseitai, but there was no way to get all the painted ones without spending more money than I was willing to part with (I ended up with 12 of the 44 produced). Instead, I just play with a house rule that you can't use a second instance of the same maseitai, even if it is painted.

There were all kinds of crazy things that were purely collectible, but didn't affect play. Besides standard gray and painted maseitai, there were ghost (clear crystal) figures, glow-in-the-dark figures, and figures with gold bases instead of the regular black. Then there were foil versions for some of the cards, the vinyl playmat, and the additional Navias (all functionally identical). The 7th Navia, Persephone, was extremely rare.

Definitely agree that it's a great game, and I hope to get back to playing it more in the future.
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Martin Larouche
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navia drapt could be reprinted with all the pieces ever made if they just changed the minis for cards.
move the cards on the board and flip them to the other side when you upgrade them...

not as pretty, but it could be sold for 30$ for the complete set instead of it's old asking price of above 300$
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You left out my favorite part of the game: it ends by capturing the Navia, not putting her in checkmate. So even if you're opponent manages to swoop in and set you up for certain death, you usually get the moral satisfaction of capturing a big piece on your way out... zombie

(Actually, my favorite part is the multiple avenues of victory. And a Navia Line-over is certainly achievable, although not using Olip's or other powers since the Navia is immune to those. The fact that people forget that it's possible does help a bit. ninja )

RedMonkeyBoy wrote:
Yeah - I hate the blind packaging model. As far as I am concerned there is no justifiable reason to ever use it - no game has every been improved by using blind packaging. It is a blatant money grab ploy whenever it's used.

I compare the cost of CMGs like Star Wars and Mechwarrior to the cost of pre-painted minis like AT-43 and Battlefield: Evolution, and I see an improvement. Not that it was a good fit for Navia Dratp, but there are games where I find it acceptable.

RedMonkeyBoy wrote:
True to a certain extent - but I thought the coloured variants were rare chasers. Not that you needed them - but they were definitely put in there (along with the rules for including coloured and non-coloured Maseitai) to feed the addiction of completists.

The colored Maseitai were one to a case in the first set, and that was rare enough that even rabid completionists were forced to use eBay. They did see the error and made it one per booster (well, 9 per case, since there were also 3 Navia in the case) in the second set.
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deedob wrote:
Indeed, some miniatures were definitely more rare than others.

When the game was going out... i bought 20 boosters at each the cost of 1$ (the store manager was a friend and he really couldn't sell those anymore).

Out of those 20 boosters, i got 1 painted Navia and one other which had a painted variant of a unit in the second starter set.

I believe a completist would have spend a ridiculous amount of $$$ to get all the painted variants.

And as a side note, with those 20 boosters, i was still missing 3 masetai and 1 navia... I can't even begin to understand how much $$$ would've been needed to get a complete set from boosters alone. Each booster was sold at 15$. So if i bought those 20 at "regular price" instead of only 1$, i would've spent 300$ on boosters alone, not even counting the two base sets.
And it's not even a full set... with only "1" painted masetai.

If "EBAY" is the only answer to get a full set... yuk. And that's for a game which had what? 40 different miniatures?

The sad part of all that is that the game itself was pretty good. It's the casualty of the distribution model really.


I think you may have simply had bad luck. When I bought a case of 12 Unleashed Darkness boosters, I ended up with nearly two complete sets, and relatively few duplicates. Of course, I suppose it's just as likely that it was my luck which was unusual.
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Unfortunately, most of my boosters were from Five Below, and it was pretty obvious that whoever had those boosters before took out the valuable pieces and taped them back up again.

I do have some colored and one clear piece, but none of those came from the packs I bought from Five Below. I ended up giving some of them to a friend of mine, as well as the two base sets.
 
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Bwian wrote:
You left out my favorite part of the game: it ends by capturing the Navia, not putting her in checkmate. So even if you're opponent manages to swoop in and set you up for certain death, you usually get the moral satisfaction of capturing a big piece on your way out... zombie

(Actually, my favorite part is the multiple avenues of victory. And a Navia Line-over is certainly achievable, although not using Olip's or other powers since the Navia is immune to those. The fact that people forget that it's possible does help a bit. ninja )



Of course - you are right about Olip, it's on the last page of the rule book. And I did actually know the rule (I have never used a Maseitai power on a Navia, and I have never acheived a Navia line-over), but I had a bit of a moment writing the review and just threw that idea in at the last minute without really thinking about it! Oops - better change that.

I'm not quite sure I understand your Navia comment - my review covered checkmating and capturing (I used the term "killing") the Navia.
 
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RedMonkeyBoy wrote:
I'm not quite sure I understand your Navia comment - my review covered checkmating and capturing (I used the term "killing") the Navia.

It's a minor thing, but it tickles my funny bone, so I like to point it out: there is no checkmate in this game. There is "check", and there is "dead". It's quite possible to be in inescapable check, which is of course functionally equivalent to checkmate, except for the fact that you get one move to wreak havok on your opponent before you lose.

Just a silly thing, I know...
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Bwian wrote:
RedMonkeyBoy wrote:
I'm not quite sure I understand your Navia comment - my review covered checkmating and capturing (I used the term "killing") the Navia.

It's a minor thing, but it tickles my funny bone, so I like to point it out: there is no checkmate in this game. There is "check", and there is "dead". It's quite possible to be in inescapable check, which is of course functionally equivalent to checkmate, except for the fact that you get one move to wreak havok on your opponent before you lose.

Just a silly thing, I know...


Oh - I'm with you. That's actually the way I wrote the review. I did say that the first way to win was to "kill" the Navia, and that meant if you were in checkmate then you've lost; but the way I wrote it was a little confusing as it made it sound like the checkmate position marked the immediate end of the game (which it kinda does).

The game state of checkmate does exist, it just doesn't get a specific name and they let you make one more pointless move. Navia are obviously very stubborn girls.
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RedMonkeyBoy wrote:
Bwian wrote:
RedMonkeyBoy wrote:
I'm not quite sure I understand your Navia comment - my review covered checkmating and capturing (I used the term "killing") the Navia.

It's a minor thing, but it tickles my funny bone, so I like to point it out: there is no checkmate in this game. There is "check", and there is "dead". It's quite possible to be in inescapable check, which is of course functionally equivalent to checkmate, except for the fact that you get one move to wreak havok on your opponent before you lose.

Just a silly thing, I know...


Oh - I'm with you. That's actually the way I wrote the review. I did say that the first way to win was to "kill" the Navia, and that meant if you were in checkmate then you've lost; but the way I wrote it was a little confusing as it made it sound like the checkmate position marked the immediate end of the game (which it kinda does).

The game state of checkmate does exist, it just doesn't get a specific name and they let you make one more pointless move. Navia are obviously very stubborn girls.


This is actually the same in Asian chess games (such as Chinese Chess) where you have to capture the king to win.
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yitjuan wrote:

This is actually the same in Asian chess games (such as Chinese Chess) where you have to capture the king to win.


It's not surprising. Navia Dratp is basically a Shogi variant. I just always use Chess as the comparison point, as in the UK most people would know Chess while far fewer people would know Shogi.
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RedMonkeyBoy wrote:
yitjuan wrote:

This is actually the same in Asian chess games (such as Chinese Chess) where you have to capture the king to win.


It's not surprising. Navia Dratp is basically a Shogi variant. I just always use Chess as the comparison point, as in the UK most people would know Chess while far fewer people would know Shogi.


Navia is a Shogi variant? surprise

It's not so much a variant as a completely different game with no ties altogether with one another.
It's like calling Dust Tactics a "Memoir 44" variant...
 
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deedob wrote:
RedMonkeyBoy wrote:
yitjuan wrote:

This is actually the same in Asian chess games (such as Chinese Chess) where you have to capture the king to win.


It's not surprising. Navia Dratp is basically a Shogi variant. I just always use Chess as the comparison point, as in the UK most people would know Chess while far fewer people would know Shogi.


Navia is a Shogi variant? surprise

It's not so much a variant as a completely different game with no ties altogether with one another.
It's like calling Dust Tactics a "Memoir 44" variant...


If you don't think there are any ties at all between Shogi and Navia Dratp, you may be playing one of them wrong

Yes, there are many differences (I'm not suggesting you can change one rule and suddenly play Shogi with your Navia Dratp set), but the influences are obvious. "Variant" is probably not quite the right word.

Promotion (dratping) is the most obvious thing, but also a lot of the movement options for certain pieces, the initial set up formation (to an extent), the way you win by capturing the king, the thousand year war situation, there's more things I'm.

I believe even the designer of Navia Dratp said it was inspired by Shogi.
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RedMonkeyBoy wrote:
deedob wrote:
RedMonkeyBoy wrote:
yitjuan wrote:

This is actually the same in Asian chess games (such as Chinese Chess) where you have to capture the king to win.


It's not surprising. Navia Dratp is basically a Shogi variant. I just always use Chess as the comparison point, as in the UK most people would know Chess while far fewer people would know Shogi.


Navia is a Shogi variant? surprise

It's not so much a variant as a completely different game with no ties altogether with one another.
It's like calling Dust Tactics a "Memoir 44" variant...


If you don't think there are any ties at all between Shogi and Navia Dratp, you may be playing one of them wrong

Yes, there are many differences (I'm not suggesting you can change one rule and suddenly play Shogi with your Navia Dratp set), but the influences are obvious. "Variant" is probably not quite the right word.

Promotion (dratping) is the most obvious thing, but also a lot of the movement options for certain pieces, the initial set up formation (to an extent), the way you win by capturing the king, the thousand year war situation, there's more things I'm.

I believe even the designer of Navia Dratp said it was inspired by Shogi.


Yeah well, Twilight Imperium 3 was inspired by Puerto Rico...
Dominion was inspired by StarCraft: tbg...
Pente was inspired by Go...

Yet none of those games are remotely the same.
Each game is always inspired by a game that came before it. Nothing is original anymore.

Navia having a few similarities to Shogi (or even being inspired by it) does not mean they have anything to do with one another.
Navia is so far removed from Shogi in gameplay i don't even begin to understand how they can be compared.

Talisman is nowhere near anything closely related to Monopoly, even if in both you move around a board with dice related to movement...
 
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deedob wrote:
RedMonkeyBoy wrote:
deedob wrote:
RedMonkeyBoy wrote:
yitjuan wrote:

This is actually the same in Asian chess games (such as Chinese Chess) where you have to capture the king to win.


It's not surprising. Navia Dratp is basically a Shogi variant. I just always use Chess as the comparison point, as in the UK most people would know Chess while far fewer people would know Shogi.


Navia is a Shogi variant? surprise

It's not so much a variant as a completely different game with no ties altogether with one another.
It's like calling Dust Tactics a "Memoir 44" variant...


If you don't think there are any ties at all between Shogi and Navia Dratp, you may be playing one of them wrong

Yes, there are many differences (I'm not suggesting you can change one rule and suddenly play Shogi with your Navia Dratp set), but the influences are obvious. "Variant" is probably not quite the right word.

Promotion (dratping) is the most obvious thing, but also a lot of the movement options for certain pieces, the initial set up formation (to an extent), the way you win by capturing the king, the thousand year war situation, there's more things I'm.

I believe even the designer of Navia Dratp said it was inspired by Shogi.


Yeah well, Twilight Imperium 3 was inspired by Puerto Rico...
Dominion was inspired by StarCraft: tbg...
Pente was inspired by Go...

Yet none of those games are remotely the same.
Each game is always inspired by a game that came before it. Nothing is original anymore.

Navia having a few similarities to Shogi (or even being inspired by it) does not mean they have anything to do with one another.
Navia is so far removed from Shogi in gameplay i don't even begin to understand how they can be compared.

Talisman is nowhere near anything closely related to Monopoly, even if in both you move around a board with dice related to movement...


I see many similarities between the two games. You don't.

You are entitled to your opinion.

You will not convince me mine is wrong.
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Thanks for the review. It's always nice to hear a fresh perspective!

Fortunately ND is no longer a 'collectable' game.
The orange starter comes with the everything needed to play. Then for some more flavor you can scan the web to purchase the 30 additional figures that you may use in 'drafting' teams.

Indeed, playing just the starter sets can grant you hours of wonton fun And having a wonderful wife is also hours of fun

Crazy Marketing is the major reason for lack of success in my humble opinion. The creator of the game designed each figure to have it's own very different powers. Crazed marketers made rules for playing doubles of the same figures if one is painted(OR crystal/glowing/bronze etc...).
Although it's sometimes fun to play that way, it had nothing to do with the original intent of the game.

There are many BGGers in the UK that should be able to hook you up with the rest of the 'Drafties' of the game.

Though Gyullas Turtle is currently your favorite piece, I have a feeling you will have gone through a bunch of other favorites by this time next year (check in with us again ok ).

Quote:
3. Move a Maseitai or Navia already on the board, and then Dratp one of your Maseitai.

Should read: Move the Navia, or Move a Maseitai, or Move then Dratp that same Maseitai.

Navia is very much "Super Shogi"
I too like it better than Chess and Shogi. Drafing pieces always make for a different game arrrh

Cheers!

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TheLongshot wrote:
Unfortunately, most of my boosters were from Five Below, and it was pretty obvious that whoever had those boosters before took out the valuable pieces and taped them back up again.

I do have some colored and one clear piece, but none of those came from the packs I bought from Five Below. I ended up giving some of them to a friend of mine, as well as the two base sets.


Got Kraa and Io from 5Below devil
 
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