GeekGold Bonus for All Supporters at year's end: 1000!
7,607 Supporters
$15 min for supporter badge & GeekGold bonus
22 Days Left

Support:

Recommend
79 
 Thumb up
 Hide
85 Posts
1 , 2 , 3 , 4  Next »   | 

BoardGameGeek» Forums » BoardGameGeek Community » Geek of the Week

Subject: Geek of the Week #354 - cmontgo2 rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Alan Richbourg
United States
Arlington
Texas
flag msg tools
badge
This is Kyoshi, our adopted Shiba Inu.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
It is my pleasure to introduce a real wargamer's wargamer, the ever helpful and friendly

Chris Montgomery
United States
Joliet
Illinois
flag msg tools
Dear Geek: Please insert the wittiest comment you can think of in this text pop-up. Then times it by seven.
badge
The Coat of Arms of Clan Montgomery - Scotland. Yes, that's a woman with the head of a savage in her hand, and an anchor. No clue what it means, but it's cool.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb

I first noticed Chris through his supremely helpful efforts to organize and support the wargaming community at BGG.con 2010 (the first one I attended). He provided just the right framework, in the form of several geeklists, to make the con the best possible experience for those of us who prefer longer or more complex games. His enthusiastic volunteer work and friendly personality are great additions to BGG and BGG.con. He also has excellent taste in games, being a fan of Napoleon's Triumph, Combat Commander: Europe, and Close Action. Without further ado, I turn over the reins to Chris:

cmontgo2 wrote:
I am a wargamer.

Like many wargamers, I’ve been enthralled by wargames - or more technically “conflict simulations” - since I was very young. The typical image of a wargamer-grog is an overweight, balding, 50s something white guy, possibly with a moustache. Though I am only 36, I am well on my way toward fulfilling the stereotype (sans moustache).

As a kid my family and I played lots of games. No one in my family was into the gaming hobby, so our gaming experiences stayed mainstream with old standbys that I am sure every kid must have played at least once (this was the mid-80s) like Clue, Monopoly, Life, Scrabble, Boggle, Connect-4, Sorry!, etc. Those years involved lots of non-boardgames, too, especially cards (Spades, Rummy, Pinocle, Euchre) and dominoes (various variants).

My grandfather taught me how to play checkers, and I never won a game. I once figured out how to beat him in one of our games, but chose to throw the game and let him go down in history as undefeated against his grandson. After the win, he patiently explained the move I COULD have done to beat him. I just gave him a hug.

At the age of 11, I landed my first paying job delivering newspapers and after my dad collected 50% of my earnings to help me save for my first car, the rest was mine to do with as I pleased. Since I never could get the family to drive me to the hobby shop, my only options were those on the shelf at K-Mart - and due to my early financial freedom, I was able to purchase Risk and Castle Risk (at 11 years old, 1987), and I was a bit successful at getting my dad and my younger brothers to play once in a while. I loved the game (Risk), and enjoyed lining up the pieces (at the time, they were plastic Roman numerals) almost as much as playing the game. But the game’s simplicity could be frustrating. Castle Risk found much more play later on, and was in my opinon, a better game.

Shortly after turning 13, with Risk just not cutting it for me, I finally was able to go to a hobby shop and my eye spied the wargame rack - amazing games I dreamt of playing, but shocked at the high prices. The shop, Leisure Hours Hobbies, is still open today, and they do a fair bit of sales on boardgames, but it is not their main focus. Back then, I purchased my first real “conflict simulation”. It was on clearance for $3 - SPI’s Onslaught! D-Day to the Rhine. I soloed that game quite a bit, and at one time convinced my uncle to play during the holidays. At that age, though, I was still learning good sportsmanship, and when he creamed me (I was the Germans) - I quit after a couple turns. Many years later, I realized that the whole point of the game was that the Germans were going to be driven back along the coast of Belgium and the goal was to delay, not hold the ground. At the time, none of that mattered, though. I remember being enamored with the black and !
white SS Panzer counters. They just looked bad-ass. Over the next year, I was content to play the game solo and often fudged results to get what I wanted.

My next “real wargame” was Avalon Hill’s Killer Angels - my first Civil War game. It was okay, but I never did have an opponent for that one, so it was all solo playing. I remember that we didn’t even have a big enough space to put out the map (I was forbidden to take over the kitchen table for the entire day), so I was lucky enough to have my own bedroom and play on the floor. Thinking back, it was probably far above my complexity level at the time - and like Onslaught!, I had no historic context.

Finally, at 15, we moved to a different town, and I met friends who were into similar things as me. The following six years included over a hundred plays of Axis and Allies, lots of roleplaying (D&D, and Vampire: The Masquerade), and at least a hundred plays of BattleTech. There were other games, too, but these were by and large the mainstays. I seem to remember a fun game I haven’t played since - Midway. In any case, this was by and large the “golden age” of my gaming - I played more games, more often, than at any other point in my life.

Then off to college (after two years locally at junior college), and gaming took a backseat. After that, law school. Upon returning home (at 26), I spent the next several years working and partying, and not gaming much, except when my old high school buddies were back in town. It was also during this period (college, law school, early career) that I went heavily for computer games, loving the Total War Series, Civilization Series, and Europa Universalis among many, many others. But except during holidays, I played very few boardgames.

I came back to the hobby - and in many ways was really introduced to it for the first time - in 2008. As far as my wargaming, what I really gained coming back were two very vital things for an appreciation of the wargaming niche: (1) a strong sense of sportsmanship (gamesmanship?) that to a large extent only comes with age, and (2) historical context (thanks to college and my own history reading). An old friend of mine from back in the hey-day during high school introduced me to Boardgamegeek, and I began using it a lot, learning about the games out there, the community of gamers all wanting to share their joys and triumphs, despairing moments, and defeats. It also allowed me do lots of research on games I wanted to buy.

I have been lurking and posting in the dark back alleys of BGG for a while - the wargaming community is very robust, here, if small. I now own well over 100 wargames, a few dozen expansions, and that doesn’t include the euros, 18xx, or the dozens of others I have sold off for various reasons through the past four years.

I will (and do!) play non-wargames, euros, card games, etc. And while I enjoy them, they are mainly either (a) diversions due to the gaming group I happen to be with that day (i.e. non-wargamers, or non-gamers) or (b) a light-fare filler to take a break from the more complex boardgames.

Today, I live in a far southwest suburb of Chicago with my wife and 9-month-old son. The big changes that come with children include less gaming - especially since I’m running Daddy Daycare three times a week. I do have a substantial number of PBEM games going at any one time, but I strongly prefer the interaction of face-to-face play, the actual pieces being manipulated, the signs of stress on my face, the heart-rending stomach flip when that crucial roll goes wrong, that thin sheen of geek-sweat after gaming for ten hours straight (admit it, you get it, too!), the awesome feeling of a hard-fought victory, and the depression of a near-win. I’ve never been much into sports, but I know what it’s like for sports fans. I feel the same way everytime I play a wargame.

My general theory of gaming is that for any game to be good (for me) it must tell a compelling story and be emotionally as well as intellectually engaging. That is: I have to stay interested, I have to want to know the ending, and I have to feel like there’s something at stake. Once a game’s narrative captures me, that game will be a game I cherish for a long, long time. This is especially true for wargames, since they, to a large degree, attempt to re-simulate and re-write history.

I am absolutely thrilled to have the honor of being GOTW - let’s get started!


Poll
Two truths and a lie. Which one is the lie?
  Your Answer   Vote Percent Vote Count
I once scored in the 99th percentile on the military’s ASVAB (Armed Services Vocational Aptitute Battery), took a supplemental mathematics and psychological exam, passed (97% and 96% respectively), and was offered a job as a military intelligence officer, which I turned down after talking with my dad about it.
20.3% 15
At the age of EIGHT, I had a baseball coach tell me: “Son, at your age, you either know how to play baseball, or you don’t. You don’t.” It was the last time I ever played baseball.
45.9% 34
One drunken eve, I broke my toe in a stupor (by kicking a large block of ice that I thought was soft, soft, snow). The X-rays revealed a long-embedded piece of metal in the bone of my right big toe, NOT the result of any injury I can remember!
33.8% 25
Voters 74
This poll is now closed.   74 answers
Poll created by chargetheguns
Closes: Sun Jul 1, 2012 6:00 am
39 
 Thumb up
0.02
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Alan Richbourg
United States
Arlington
Texas
flag msg tools
badge
This is Kyoshi, our adopted Shiba Inu.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
And some questions to get started:

1) Will you share an example of a game session that played out as a memorable story?
2) Since you bought so many wargames in a relatively short amount of time, how did you decide what to buy?
3) What do you like best about BGG.con?
4) Have you ever tried designing a game, variant, or scenario, and if so will you describe it (or them) for us?
10 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Paul Incao
United States
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Buy Stronghold Games
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Congratulations Chris. Enjoy your week !
10 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sim Guy
United States
Albuquerque
New Mexico
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
So long Alan, welcome back to the ranks of us lowly normal geeks.

CONGRATULATIONS Chris!

Better start working on that facial hair; though 'staches have been largely overtaken by 'goats'.
You are, what I would almost call, a second generation grognard: not beholden to the hex and counter conventions of old. I can tell by your collection that toy soldiers and card driven mechanics, among others, don't make you genuflect in fear. Good on you.
That said, there are still a few standard pigeon holes into which you could be stuffed:

1 Favorite scale (tactical, operational, strategic)?
2 What scale are you usually best at (not always the same)?
3 Favorite genre?
4 Favorite era?
5 What is your least favorite mechanic used in wargaming?
6 What was it that pulled you back into wargaming in 2008?

Enjoy your week in the sun!
Cheers!
12 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
skippen
United States
Greeley
Colorado
flag msg tools
admin
Cary Grant, 1904 - 1986
badge
How old Cary Grant? Old Cary Grant fine. How you?
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Congrats Chris! Glad to see you get this honor. It is not often that I get to see people I know here, much less a friend gained via BGG.con. Enjoy the week! I am envious of you smattering of fame.
13 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Hammer Man
Spain
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Congratulations Chris!!!


Enjoy your week
10 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Florida
flag msg tools
designer
"If everybody is thinking alike, then somebody isn't thinking."
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
One of the best people on BGG.

Congratulations.
13 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
"L'état, c'est moi."
Canada
Vancouver
BC
flag msg tools
admin
designer
Roger's Reviews: check out my reviews page, right here on BGG!
badge
Caution: May contain wargame like substance
Avatar
mb
Amazing that it's taken this long. Congratulations Chris!
13 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Nick R
United Kingdom
Havant
Hampshire
flag msg tools
So long and thanks for all the fish
badge
42 - Life the Universe and Everything
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Many congratulations Chris, enjoy your week

Regards

Gnome
8 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jonathan Tullsen
United States
Tigard
Oregon
flag msg tools
The Road goes ever on and on Down from the door where it began. Now far ahead the Road has gone, And I must follow, if I can, Pursuing it with eager feet, Until it joins some larger way Where many paths and errands meet.
badge
Ash nazg durbatulûk, ash nazg gimbatul, ash nazg thrakatulûk agh burzum-ishi krimpatul.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Congrats Chris!
Have a great week!
8 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Montgomery
United States
Joliet
Illinois
flag msg tools
Dear Geek: Please insert the wittiest comment you can think of in this text pop-up. Then times it by seven.
badge
The Coat of Arms of Clan Montgomery - Scotland. Yes, that's a woman with the head of a savage in her hand, and an anchor. No clue what it means, but it's cool.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks to all the well-wishers. I am truly honored, Alan - thank you for choosing me. I'll do my best to do it justice!

chargetheguns wrote:
And some questions to get started:

1) Will you share an example of a game session that played out as a memorable story?


I'll give you one that you can appreciate. Last BGG.Con I played a game of Napoleon's Triumph against leroy43 and kuhrusty. I was the Allied side, and leroy43 was in his first game as the commander of the French forces. Defying convention, he called my bluffs as I advanced my corps across the plains and attacked instead of falling back. I had three corps broken down in chaos in my center, scattered across the wide plains before 10:00 AM. While the corps commanders worked on reorganizing their corps (and I was grasping for way to avoid total defeat), kuhrusty brought in the French reinforcements along my left flank. On the one hand, things were not looking good for the Allies, but on the other, I could shift gears to a defensive posture. I still think he did it out of mercy, but he swears he didn't.

I dug in along the Pratzenburg Heights and sparred my way through hour after horrible hour, biting my teeth and ordering corps all along the line, most of which arrived just in time to stave off a collapse and general retreat. By the 4:00 PM turn, I had fought the French to a standstill, with each of us having 1 morale left. I knew I had places in my line that could give the French a victory, but I resisted the urge to start checking my pieces - no reason to give them any clues!

kuhrusty ordered an attack against the Pratzenberg, certain that the lone unit there was a 1-strength cavalry, but it was not be. The French took a casualty, and I had stolen victory out of the jaws of defeat. It was probably one of the best sessions of any game since my return to gaming in 2008. The tension was palpable.

Quote:
2) Since you bought so many wargames in a relatively short amount of time, how did you decide what to buy?


Before the birth of my son robbed me of spare cash, I had a good paying job, so I could afford to splurge on pretty much any whim. I stuck early on with very popular games at the time (Hammer of the Scots, Tide of Iron, etc.) but quickly advanced to what I knew I wanted to play: heavy wargames. I primarily decided what games to buy based on BGG research and historical periods I was interested in -- chiefly American Civil War and World War I. With that in mind, I grabbed Paths of Glory, a couple of games in the Civil War Brigade Series, and For the People. From there, I began to figure out what I liked, and had the luxury of being able to absorb the cost when I got an occasional "lemon".

Quote:
3) What do you like best about BGG.con?


The open gaming and the people. It's one of the rare times I can find an opponent for an all-day game of For the People, or a six-player game if Here I Stand. I started going on the recommendation of my long-time friend,

Tim Gilberg
United States
Norman
Oklahoma
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb


and I've never looked back. Getting to put faces to the avatars is also really cool. By my second and third year, I had a pretty good core of friends that would meet annually - it also gives me a good reason to get back in touch with gilby, since we only see each other about twice a year, anymore.

[b]4) Have you ever tried designing a game, variant, or scenario, and if so will you describe it (or them) for us?[/q]

I designed an intro scenario for Tide of Iron and entered it in their contest. It was one of the final five scenarios chosen - but in the end it was not selected as the grand-prize winner. Looking back on it, they made the right choice. It was a good scenario, I think, but not as good as the winner's.

I also have tried on many occasions to design different projects - a set of miniatures rules for ACW regimental-scale 1/300, a card-game about being an attorney and trying to make money, and various other little projects that were started, then my ADHD kicked in, and I was off doing something else. The card-game about litigation got the furthest along, despite the fact that it isn't a wargame.

I would also like to try my hand at an operational-level ACW game series, starting with the Peninsular Campaign - but it's just in a conceptual stage. The truth is, there's just not very many operational-scale ACW titles out there (with the exception of Great Camapaigns of the American Civil War, but that series has been around for nearly 20 years).

Thanks again!
18 
 Thumb up
5.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Montgomery
United States
Joliet
Illinois
flag msg tools
Dear Geek: Please insert the wittiest comment you can think of in this text pop-up. Then times it by seven.
badge
The Coat of Arms of Clan Montgomery - Scotland. Yes, that's a woman with the head of a savage in her hand, and an anchor. No clue what it means, but it's cool.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
SimGuy wrote:
Better start working on that facial hair; though 'staches have been largely overtaken by 'goats'.
You are, what I would almost call, a second generation grognard: not beholden to the hex and counter conventions of old. I can tell by your collection that toy soldiers and card driven mechanics, among others, don't make you genuflect in fear. Good on you.
That said, there are still a few standard pigeon holes into which you could be stuffed:

1 Favorite scale (tactical, operational, strategic)?


Probably tactical - I love Musket and Pike, Civil War Brigade Series, Combat Commander, etc. However, I have my share of all these scales, and would never want to limit myself to just one!

Quote:
2 What scale are you usually best at (not always the same)?


Strategic.

Quote:
3 Favorite genre?


Toss-up between CDGs and more modern hex-and-counter games.

Quote:
4 Favorite era?


American Civil War, hands down. Though any thing in the gunpowder/musket era really sparks my imagination. And World War I is a close second.

I see WWI as a tragic story of how the world grew up and became mean in a modern way. I see in that war a struggle between military leaders' desire for an "honorable" war, and the necessity to run to the lowest common denominator because winning was all that mattered. This disconnect between a world that the military leaders wanted (glory, bravery, cavalry charges, etc.) and the political necessities of the day, coupled with technological advancements, rendered a very vicious war that in many ways was more vicious than World War II. Though obviously, World War II had exponentially more casualties.

Quote:
5 What is your least favorite mechanic used in wargaming?


Hmmm. I've always thought that mechanics can't be divorced from the function for which they are employed. So it's hard for me to talk about one with out the other. Form follows function, and all that. So the trick in a game is to get the right mechanic paired with the right simulative aspect of the game.

If I had to pick one mechanic as my least favorite, it would probably be chit-pulls. Don't know why. But chit-pull mechanics are hard to pull off well and I seem to always think there's a better way of handling it. Then again, I've seen it used to really good effect in some games (such as 1805).

Quote:
6 What was it that pulled you back into wargaming in 2008?


I think it was at this late date (32 year old) that I finally started figuring out the things I really wanted to do. I have to admit, though, that i purchase many games because I like the IDEA of playing them. Somewhere deep down, I know that most of the games I buy will never see a face-to-face play. I buy them because I get happy thoughts thinking how cool it will be when I "finally get it to the table someday." What I've always loved about wargaming is that it's a fun way to explore historical possibilities, rewrite history, change the textbooks. There's something incredibly powerful about that thought - and, of course, any good wargame will give you a fresh perspective on the period of history you're playing in.

Quote:
Enjoy your week in the sun!
Cheers!


Thanks! I'm thrilled to be here and I'll do my best to get a sunburn.
15 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
James Fehr
Canada
Edmonton
Alberta
flag msg tools
badge
Hi there! Follow my gaming exploits on Twitter (fehrmeister)
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Congratulations Chris! I hope your week is thoroughly enjoyable.

Here are my questions for you:
- What's the best thing about living in Joliet?
- I see that your favorite game is Combat Commander: Europe. Why do you like this particular game so much? What is your response to the naysayers who think there's too much luck for this type of game?
- What do you think is one of the most underrated games here on Boardgamegeek? What might be the most overrated in your opinion?
- What is your favorite game store (online or bricks-and-mortar)?
- If you could live anywhere in the world for one year, all expenses paid, where would it be and why?

I think your 2 truths and a lie are great - one of the harder sets to make a guess on. I'm going with the stubbed toe as the lie...
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tenpence nonthericher
United States
Deerfield
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
congrats
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jerry Wilkinson
United States
New Castle
Indiana
flag msg tools
badge
When asking "What would Jesus do?", remember that flipping over tables and using a whip are within the realm of possibilities.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hello, Chris, and congratulations!

Of all the games that you have never played which 2 games are you looking forward to trying the most?
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Erik Nicely
United States
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Congratulations, Chris.

How many games of Here I Stand do you think you'll play right around the 3rd week of November?
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris B
Canada
Victoria
British Columbia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb

Awesome! Another wargamer as GOTW!. Congratulations and enjoy your week!
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Montgomery
United States
Joliet
Illinois
flag msg tools
Dear Geek: Please insert the wittiest comment you can think of in this text pop-up. Then times it by seven.
badge
The Coat of Arms of Clan Montgomery - Scotland. Yes, that's a woman with the head of a savage in her hand, and an anchor. No clue what it means, but it's cool.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
fehrmeister wrote:
Congratulations Chris! I hope your week is thoroughly enjoyable.

Here are my questions for you:
- What's the best thing about living in Joliet?


It's a rough-and-tumble blue collar town that's never been able to shake off it's steel-plant roots. I like that. The town is honest with itself. It doesn't hold pretensions. The people who live here and like it, like it because of these qualities. We've got lots of neighborhood bars, nice old historical sections of town from the early 1900s (some houses from the late-1800s!). There's lots of history here, and the town lets you know it if you just get off the main thoroughfares.

The best thing about living here is my job - I'm a firefighter - and the citizens take very good care of us (salary, benefits, etc.). As a result, I really enjoy taking good care of them. There's something really rewarding about living in the same town where it's your job to protect life and property. Though public servants are under fire these days, I don't ever foresee myself leaving this job. It's hard, but nearly every morning I leave work, I leave feeling like I made a difference in someone's life, lent a helping hand where one was needed - I feel like I'm the instrument of the community's goodwill, each person who lives here to all the others. They've chosen me to help them. And that makes me very proud, and paradoxically, humble.

My day-to-day assignment is on an ambulance that runs about 12 calls a day in the roughest part of town. We get lots of unfortunate incidents throughout the summer: shootings, stabbings, overdoses, and lots of elderly people with no air conditioning in the summer. The hotter it gets, the more we run.

Quote:
I see that your favorite game is Combat Commander: Europe. Why do you like this particular game so much? What is your response to the naysayers who think there's too much luck for this type of game?


I should update my collection - but Combat Commander: Europe is one of my favorite games, tied with the Civil War Brigade Series.

I like this game because it captures (albiet in an abstract way) the limitations of command and control in a combat environment. And for a game of it's size and scope, it is just about the perfect length of time to play (1.0 - 2.5 hours). It's one of the very best games to play before or after that mammoth 12-hour slog. It loosens you up. The game is consistently tense from start to finish, and no matter how bad you think things are: never, ever, concede a game. You ALWAYS have a chance of pulling out a victory (if you play well and if you get a little luck).

As for the question about luck, I can only say that each person has to play games they enjoy - there's far too many games out there to waste your time on a game that doesn't do it for you. In Combat Commander, there is so much luck in the game, it's virtually impossible to have a a bad run of luck cost you the game. There's simply too many opportunities for "dice rolls" and such for bad luck to last very long (or good luck, for that matter). Consider how many other games with comparably less randomness aren't criticized for this, yet in those games, the random elements have a far larger impact on the game precisely because there is less of it.

The fact of the matter is that between players of unequal parity in experience, the more experienced player will usually win. I could amend that to say the "better" player will win - but getting better at the game requires one to play it a hell of a lot (like any game).

I could go on, and on, but I already have a bad case of diarrhea of the word processor, so I'll leave it at that.

Good question, though!

Quote:
- What do you think is one of the most underrated games here on Boardgamegeek?


You know, there is a series of ACW games published by Clash of Arms Games in the '90s called the "Civil War Campaign Series" with such title as Autumn of Glory and Mississippi Fortress. Gittes has done some very excellent reviews of the games in the series, and they are unique in their fog of war elements as well as their attempt to simulate various campaigns in an area-movement environment. I would love for someone to pick up this series, polish it a bit more for the modern wargamer, and release them with great production quality.

Quote:
What might be the most overrated in your opinion?


I very rarely accuse any game of being overrated. If I had to pick a recent game that I thought didn't rise to the hype, I suppose I'd select a game by one of my favorite designers - Chad Jensen. I had been looking for Chad's take on a tactical game with tanks (for those who don't know, Combat Commander does not have vehicles). This game was finally designed by him, and I was unimpressed with it after playing it several times. I won't go into a long dissertation on why the game didn't do it for me - but Fighting Formations: Grossdeutschland Motorized Infantry Division was well-received, but it is, in my opinion, overrated.

Quote:
What is your favorite game store (online or bricks-and-mortar)?


I like wargamedepot because they donate money to disabled veterans. They're prices aren't always the best, but they are competitive. And knowing that $1 out of every $100 goes to help a veteran makes it worthwhile. I also like Boards and Bits due to their progressive discount program and free shipping over $100.

Quote:
If you could live anywhere in the world for one year, all expenses paid, where would it be and why?


Wow. This is a tough one. How large of an area are we talking? Is "Europe" an acceptable answer? I would love to travel that wonderful continent and see thousands of historical places and buildings.

If I had to narrow it to a single country, I would probably pick France as a base of operations.

If I had to narrow it to a single city, I'd probably rather boringly select Paris.

Quote:
I think your 2 truths and a lie are great - one of the harder sets to make a guess on. I'm going with the stubbed toe as the lie...


You'll find out next Sunday!
13 
 Thumb up
2.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Montgomery
United States
Joliet
Illinois
flag msg tools
Dear Geek: Please insert the wittiest comment you can think of in this text pop-up. Then times it by seven.
badge
The Coat of Arms of Clan Montgomery - Scotland. Yes, that's a woman with the head of a savage in her hand, and an anchor. No clue what it means, but it's cool.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Harkonnen13 wrote:
Congratulations, Chris.

How many games of Here I Stand do you think you'll play right around the 3rd week of November?


One. I always only play one. Unless I'm feeling like two.
11 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Montgomery
United States
Joliet
Illinois
flag msg tools
Dear Geek: Please insert the wittiest comment you can think of in this text pop-up. Then times it by seven.
badge
The Coat of Arms of Clan Montgomery - Scotland. Yes, that's a woman with the head of a savage in her hand, and an anchor. No clue what it means, but it's cool.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Jrtolf wrote:
Hello, Chris, and congratulations!

Of all the games that you have never played which 2 games are you looking forward to trying the most?


Thanks again to all the well wishers! What a great community of supportive geeks who take their time to ask questions about me.

The two I am looking to try the most that I have never played are . . .

Clash of Monarchs - Hard to get to players together for this one!

Amateurs to Arms! - It's the 200 year anniversary of the war, after all, and this game really looks beautiful. Hoping to test-drive it at BGG Con this year.
10 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jeff G
United States
Santa Rosa
California
flag msg tools
These are not the droids you're looking for. You can go about your business.
badge
Move along.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Congrats Firefighter Brother Chris!

Any RPGs in your past or present?

Is there a type of boardgame that you will not play and why?

Enjoy your week!
8 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Paul Bradley
Australia
Canberra
ACT
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Congrats Chris - have a great week as BGG Geek of the Week.
8 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Hunga Dunga
Canada
Oakville
Ontario
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Congratulations!

Have you played any block games besides Hammer of the Scots?

If so, which one do you like the best?
11 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jacovis
United States
Las Vegas
Nevada
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Awesome, congrats Chris!!
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steve
United States
Edgerton
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Congratulations Chris!
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2 , 3 , 4  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.