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Subject: 0.99 starting price on ebay = suicide? rss

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Jerry Martin
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Honestly your best bet it to list it here on BGG.
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Chuck Meeks
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Unless it is rare, highly sought after and well known to the public at large, you are much better off selling it on BGG.
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Bender B. Rodriguez
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I've been involved in a few bidding wars on ebay, but nothing is guaranteed. I've seen games go for well over what it would cost to get them from your FLGS, but also seen games go very cheap. I managed to grab some old OOP games for around 10-12 with a starting bid of 9.99. If you're going to list it on ebay, I'd set the price for at least 20 if not even higher.
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mike
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I've been selling for over 10 years now on ebay and found that majorrity of sales are not coming from auction style pricing anymore, buyers want a buy it now price and the ability to make an offer.

I stick with games, movies, comics, sports cards and 80s toys primarily and I have noticed this the last few years.

You're better off setting a fixed price and then accepting offers if you're willing to go a bit lower than that price.
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Welcome to the world of commerce. There's not a single person out there that has something to sell that isn't looking for that sweet spot that entices people to bid or buy, but also maximizes profit and ROI. eBay is just too volatile of a marketplace if you're looking to not get stuck selling something for a dollar. There are things you can do to increase how many people view your item on eBay, but it's never a guarantee and eBay's (and Paypal's) fees are plentiful and high enough for me to list all but the rarest and most desirable games in the BGG Marketplace.
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Max Way
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Just a thought: you could consider listing on ebay with a reasonable reserve... though I suppose in that case, one could also just start with a higher starting bid.
 
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David C
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chubber911 wrote:
I've sold a few things on ebay over the years, and I like to set prices to 99 cents and create a bidding war. I've found this has always worked out well, however, in my history it's only been with things like ipods and video games. Is this strategy still successful with a niche market like euro board games? More specifically, Dominion? I'd be looking to list my entire collection as one lot. Has anyone here seen bidding wars on board games on ebay? Any of you ever found a complete steal because of the lack of a bidding war?

Sorry if this is the wrong forum, I didn't think this belonged in trades.


There's a Lord of the Rings auction going for $2.85 that I'm grabbing the popcorn for. It's not highly sought after, but it does command a reasonably decent sum of money.

One solid rule I have: Never end an auction on a Friday/Saturday night. I've been on the other side of that when I see one ending on a Friday/Satuurday night and it's worked fantastically.

------------------------------------

As far as Dominion goes... it's a reasonably popular eurogame. Ticket to Ride, Catan, Dominion... they're not nearly as niche as you would think. To boot, that gets the folks that have heard of these games, but haven't gone so far as to start freebasing coolstuffinc.
 
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Isaac Citrom
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I'm not saying this is correct, only that this is what I did. I've sold about a dozen valuable games, several that went for hundreds of dollars. I sold them all as auctions and always started at one cent. I trusted in the marketplace that if what I had to sell was actually of value, the market would meet that value. It did every time. The point was that I minimized my eBay fees such that I listed every auction for nothing, not having to pay a lot of extra fees for reserves and high starting prices.

For example, I sold The Longest Day which sold for several hundred dollars and fetched more than the recent market prices. I started it at one cent. Frankly, I had no worries that someone would "steal it" for one cent.

One thing that I did do is list my auctions tactically. I made sure my item was not in competition with another identical item. Secondly, if there was one being sold, I waited until that auction ended and then listed mine while the market was still hot for it. Losing bidders, I found, didn't want to lose the opportunity a second time.

I found that shipping cost was an important factor and charged only postage plus a couple of dollars. High shipping drove down bidding.

I posted excellent, long, detailed listings. I felt that bidders wanted to be sure in every respect as to what they were getting if they were to bid top dollar. I think that this more than anything else got me the most money I could for my items.

Another thing that I did was that I posted so that my auctions ended around 23h30 EST on Sundays. The only logic there is that I thought most everyone would be available to track the auction's end live whether on the East coast or the West. I didn't want my auction to end at 03h30 with bidders asleep who might have bid further; or at 15h30, for example, while people were busy at work.

I only ever got burned once on a sealed box set for an RPG that not I nor anyone else was ever interested in. Somebody grabbed it for a penny. In retrospect that's not surprising at all because it was an uninteresting item. I didn't feel I "lost" more than, say, $5.

Is your super Dominion collection of value? If it is, people will bid for it. If it's worth $100--that is to say, people are actually prepared to part with $100 for it--no interested buyer is not going to bid on it when it's $1, $5, $10, nor $50. Auctions work.

Having said that, I agree in that I also do see the value to the market in "Buy it Now" listings. I know that I, myself, often know what I want, want the item, don't wish to niggle, and don't care if I pay a few dollars more than I might have on an auction. I hit the "Buy it Now" button and am happy for the quick and sure purchase. That is, if I feel the "Buy it Now" price is what I'd be willing to pay.

I think that in the end you are likely to get the most money with an auction. But, I say that reservedly. Are there 10 super Dominion collections up for sale right now? Is it difficult to assemble your collection piecemeal? Are your cards well taken care of? That is, if your item is of great value to potential Dominion purchasers, it will fetch a great amount.

Again, very much so, this is my opinion. But, I will add, based on what I have actually done in the past and with excellent results.
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