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Subject: First time painter (I think I've found a new hobby!) rss

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Cedric Chong
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It was love at first sight. The purchase had no rationale. I walked into my FLGS and saw this big box staring at me. It reminded me of Gauntlet. I didn't come to BGG to read any reviews. I didn't know of this game before hand. Didn't know anything about it.

I bought it.

The Shock
Who buys a boardgame without reading reviews on BGG first?

I had a shock when I opened up the box to find millions of bits of mini-body parts all bagged nicely, like an episode of Dexter.

Oh my god, what have I gotten myself into?

I spent a few hours reading up what's this game really about.. and went back to my FLGS to buy some gaming glue. Went home, and spent a few more hours putting everything together.

The Decision
It was while putting all the pieces together that I had this wild idea of trying to paint them. How hard can it be right?

I spent a few more hours reading up painting tutorials here on BGG. There are a few good ones which I bookmarked.
1. Beginner's primer to painting.
2. DIP method post
3. Painting Plastic Minis


Session 1

I went back to my FLGS, and bought a starter set from Army Painter. It looked decent. I read several painting tutorials on BGG, and decided to try the DIP method as well. The DIP method post made it sounds so easy! Went back home, and painted my first ever mini! I tried different methods and experimented abit.

Lessons learnt:
1. Using DIP method, the results is very hard to control. I bought a can of Quick Shade from Army Painter, and found the result gave my figures a very dirty and unpredictable look.
2. Spraying primer indoor is bad!
3. Spraying matte varnish on mini may kill the paint job! (Check out the picture of the back of the treasure chest. Whole piece of paint came off! I have to stick it back and cover it up with new paint. But since I cannot control how the DIP method will affect it's final look, the result is as shown below..)



Session 2

I choose my next "victim", and thought that the Ironscale looked relatively easy to paint. So I busted open my Army Painter paint set, primed the minis, and started painting it the next day. I spent the next 3 hours painting the minis.. and when they were all done, I put them into the DIP... That was when my first nightmare occurred!

All the details I just spent the last 3 hours working on were gone!

I went into depression.. and put off painting for a few months..

Lessons learnt:
1. Spraying primer indoor is really bad! I cannot get a consistent coverage on the models. The result is I have some sides too thick, and some sides not covered at all.
2. DIP method is really difficult to control...


Session 3
After the previous bad experience on my Ironscales, I put off painting for a long time. I wanted to give up. Painting is hard! But the problem is, since I had already started painting some minis, I cannot stop right? The game pieces will look weird.

So I bit the bullet and decided to try again. Came back to BGG and spent a few more hours reading... and that was when I discovered the two biggest miracles of my painting life...

One. The Citadel Mechrite Red.


And two, washes.


The result is great! I love it!


Lessons learnt:
1. Mechrite Red is great!
2. Washes are super replacement to the DIP method. It is very easy method. Makes the minis look great! I love it!


Session 4


Motivated by my new found miracles, I found some time one weekend to get back to work. This time, I painted sixteen (16!) minis at one go. I broke my back after about 9 hours of painting...

I'd always wanted to do something with the bases, and so this time, I tried two new products...

I tried the new line of Citadel Texture paint, Astrogranite. And I tried Vallejo's Grey Pumice..


The Astrogranite was easier to "paint" on. It had a nice dark grey color. But it was very "thin". When it dried, it sort of lost it's initial volume and became thinner. I'd imagine you need at least 3 layers of it to cover the base. (I used it on the Whelps' base. You can see how it turned out in the pic. It's in Session 3.)

The Grey Pumice on the other hand was harder to apply on. But it was thick. I had great results with the Grey Pumice. All I needed was one coat. After it dried, I painted black over it.


Lessons learnt:
1. Vallejo's Grey Pumice = quick and easy way to get simple base on.
2. Washes are great. But too much washes isn't very good.


Session 5


Feeling encouraged with my last batch of 16 minis, I tackled the last of the small minions.. the two Dragon Priests.

I tried two new things this time round. First, section wash. And second, varnish.

I began my painting by DIPping my minis. Then I moved on to wash. But I still washed the entire mini. This time around, I tried washing different parts of the mini. For the top part of the Dragon Priests' cloak, I washed mainly with Citadel Leviathan Purple. I hoped it would bring out the purple more. Then I tried to wash the bottom part of the cloak with Citadel Carroburg Crimson. I also tried to use less wash on the front part of the mini. I thought the result of the section wash was a "cleaner" looking mini, rather than the dirtier looking minis from previous sessions.


Remember my bad experience with sprayed on varnish? I had been looking for a solution for some time. These minis would be handled a lot when played, so I wanted a varnish to protect these minis. I found the Vallejo Acrylic Varnish. I bought both the matte and the glossy versions.

I went back and coated all my previous minis with the matte varnish. It worked beautifully. The varnish was milky opaque when wet. But dried to a transparent coat. Initially, I tried to wipe off excess milky liquid. I did not know how it would turned out, fearing it will become milky when dried as well. However, after several batches of minis, I went bolder, and did a thick coat of varnish on the cloak of the Dragon Priest. When it dried... well you can see it in the pic.. the matte varnish became glossy! Not the effect I wanted in the cloak, because cloth was not supposed to be so shinny. But well, I learnt something new!

Lessons learnt:
1. Section wash somehow produces cleaner looking minis. I think this can help me when I move on to painting the heroes. Because while it's alright for the monsters to look dirtier, I want the heroes to have a cleaner and brighter look.
2. Vallejo Acrylic Varnish is great for indoor painting!
3. Thick coat of matte varnish becomes glossy.


Session 6


I finished up the treasure chests. These were really easy! I used Citadel Mournfang Brown as the base coat. Then I painted on the Citadel Shining Gold, and for some smaller parts, the Citadel Tin Bitz. For washes, I tried both the Vallejo Lavado, as well as the good old Citadel Gryphonne Sephia. I found the Citadel Gryphonne Sephia stained the gold more, and had a "deeper" effect (I don't know how else to describe it). The Vallejo Lavado on the other hand left the gold cleaner, the black pigments lined in the recess nice and clean. I did not know which was technically better. I liked the effect of the Sephia more, but I would imagine the Vallejo would give me more control over the effects of the paint.


I realised... I had spent maybe 30 hours painting.. many hours reading up on BGG, and several hours shopping at my FLGS. I had spent a few hundred dollars on my painting supplies!

I think I have found a new hobby! Painting minis!

And the funny thing was.. I had yet to read the rulebook of Super Dungeon Explore! LOL

So I took some time off and watched this fantastic series by Rodney Smith.
www.boardgamegeek.com/video/16206/super-dungeon-explore/watc...

From the videos, it seemed like I would love the game! I mean, it would have sucked if I had spent so much time painting these minis only to find the game is bad.

Can't wait to finish up the monsters and move on to the heroes!

(to be continued...)

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Session 7


The only thing separating me from the bosses (2x Rex, 1x Starfire) were the Kobold Warrens and the Egg Clutch spawning points. I thought they were easy, no sweat right? Wrong! The four Kobold Warrens took me 5 hours! The Egg Clutch took me another 1 hour.

One of my little secret was starting from Session 4, I no longer prime my models. Yup. I stopped spraying any primers before the base coats. I simply applied the Citadel Foundation/Base paints on the naked minis. And I found there was hardly any difference. This time round, I wanted the recess to be bright red, so I decided to try again.

Here were the steps:
1. Base white for entire model.
2. Painted recess with Citadel Mechrite Red along entire line.
3. Painted recess with Citadel Mephiston Red + water along center of the line.
4. Painted recess with Citadel Troll Slayer Orange + water along center of the line.
5. Painted exterior crystal part with Citadel Naggaroth Night.

It was at this step that the challenge begun. I thought with the recess/groove, it would be easy to paint the exterior part. I was so wrong. One lapse of concentration and I got extra purple paint into the recess. And this was followed by a few back-and-forth corrections of red and purple. This took me a looooong time.

The reason for step 2-4 was I wanted to try out "layering". If that was the correct term. I wanted a soft glowing effect at the center of the recess/groove. Final product turned out to be very subtle. Too subtle for the effort.

6. Painted skull with Citadel Skull White.
7. Painted skull with Citadel Pallid Wych Flesh.
8. Painted the eye sockets and nose with Mechrite Red and Mephiston Red.
9. 2 coats of wash of Citadel Sephia. I used both the old one and the new one.

One coat of the wash looked right, but still too bright for my taste. In any case, there were some parts that I missed, so I coated the skulls a second time. By the second coat, it looked just nice.

10. Tried to dry brush Xereus Purple on the edges of the crystal. Failed.
11. Re-cover up with Naggaroth Night.

I simply could not get my dry-brushing to work!

12. Wash the purple crystal sections with a purple wash, Leviathan Purple. Found it didn't make much difference.
13. Wash the base sections and various protruding parts of the crystal with Sephia.
14. Finally, one super thick coat of Vallejo Matte Varnish!

Phew. Not the walk-in-the-park I was expecting! The Egg Clutch on the other hand was faster, simply because there was no recess/groove in the model. Oh, and as a comparison, I did not prime the Egg Clutch white. I found absolutely no difference the way it turned out.

Lessons learnt:
1. Priming is not necessary.
2. Super thick coat of matte varnish makes model looks weird. I really should cut down on this practice.
3. I should be more aggressive with the 3 layers of red-orange. The orange is too watered down, so the effect becomes too subtle.


Session 8
I had finally completed all the smaller minions and chests. Only Rex and Starfire to go! I stared at Rex (both of them) for the longest time. But in the end, I decided to push them back for now, and started on...

Ember Mage!


I thought the Kobold Warrens (from Session 7) was long, this single mini took me 5 hours! Yes, one single mini. The longest time I had spent on a single mini so far. Is this normal?

The first challenge was the skin color. I found out of the entire range of Citadel paints, there was not a single tone I like. I had not mixed paints before this, but I felt I really needed to. So I experimented a bit and got the tone I like. It was four-part Kislev Flesh, two-part Skull White, one-part Emperor's Children. Nice result!


Noticed I did not prime my mini.. This became a challenge on the yellow-golden parts of the hood.


Five hours later... almost done... applied Vallejo Grey Pumice to the base.


The eyes took me a looooong time. More time spent planning and doing breathing exercises than actually painting the eyes. I thought I had steady hands, but when I was trying to paint them, my hand shook so violently it wasn't funny. In the end, after much breathing exercises, I managed to execute and completed the eyes to my liking.

I also had a fairly decent dry brushing this time round. It was not spectacular, but passable. The dry brushed portions were the tips of the hood, one side of the hood, and the edges of the cloths.


I wanted the base to have a different color. Something more heroic. I tried gold. Failed. That was after 3 thick coats, the grey was still showing. After much torment, I decided to repaint the base black.


Final result:


It turned out much better than I had anticipated. Originally I had wanted to complete Rex and Starfire before tackling the heroes.. you know.. to sort of gain more experience painting. But I took the risk. I really like the final result.

Lessons learnt:
1. Multiple coats of paint on pumice (the base) makes it look bad.
2. My first dry brushing success!
3. My secret formula for the skin tone: Four-part Kislev Flesh, two-part Skull White, one-part Emperor's Children.
4. Wait for paint and wash to dry fully before painting over/near it! I learnt the hard way.

Painting the hero was so exhausting! I really needed a break...

zzz

(to be continued...)

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Session 9
Took advice of Gormash and had some time off. Watched the batman movies re-run before catching The Dark Knight Rises at the cinema

Then back to work!





One of the lessons learnt earlier was to wait for the paint to dry fully. Thus, I decided to paint two minis at the same time. I chose the Hexcast Sorceress and the Glimmerdusk Ranger!

I found the Hexcast Sorceress much easier to paint than the Glimmerdusk Ranger. It could be the way the mini is shaped. Or it could be my choice of colors. Overall I was much happier with the results of the Sorceress than that of the Ranger.

Hexcast Sorceress


Glimmerdusk Ranger


Girls Power!


Lessons learnt:
1. It is really easier to paint two minis at the same session. I can work on one while waiting for the other to dry.
2. Take it easy. Slow down. I find I enjoy it more.
3. Citadel Reikland Fleshshade is terrible for skin wash. It stains the skin too red. Stick with Sephia!
4. About washes for skin, I must remember to wash the skin before painting the eyes! In this session, I forgot to wash the faces before I painted the eye. So in the end, I did not wash the faces at all.
5. I really should be cleaning up the mould lines like Gormash suggested in the comments. The mould line on the orb of Hexcast Sorceress is terrible.
6. Tried more dry-brushing as wickedwretch and hskrfn822 suggested. Had more success.


(to be continued...)


---------------------------------------------------------------------

Session 10
Can't believe it I made it this far! This weekend I tried a couple of different things. First off, putty! Gormash suggested Green Stuff in a comment below. I went to my FLGS and the guy over there recommended these instead:



Supposedly, these Tamiya Epoxy Putty dries faster and becomes harder. Also bought some Army Painter files to go:



This week, I decided to finish off my mini-bosses and the dungeon boss.

Rex had several deep grooves which really needed the putty. It was a good coincidence I left Rex unpainted until now. Timely for me to try the putty. Like the Green Stuff, I mixed the putty together and push them into the grooves. It became sticky real quick. A tip from my FLGS was to wet my fingers while doing it. Sure helped! I left it overnight to dry. Next day, I used the Army Painter files to clean up the excess. This was the first time I'd ever tried this.. So you can see how messy it turned out. But after a fresh coat of Citadel Foundation paint, it looked pretty decent.



With the putty done, I started working on Rex. I could not decide on the color scheme. I kept changing it as I went along. The chains were painted with Astronomican Grey initially. But I changed to Citadel Chainmail eventually. Wanted to layer the "leather" on Rex. But the first coat of Citadel Foundation Calthan Brown turned out looking so good I just decided to leave it alone.

Note to self: The old Citadel Foundation paints are really awesome. Need to go out and buy some more before they are gone forever!

Next, with encouragement of hskrfn822 I decided to try dry-brushing more. First I dry-brushed Mephiston Red over the base Mechrite Red. Effect was very subtle. Then I moved on to the bigger project.. I dry-brushed Tau Light Ochre over the "pants" that Rex was wearing. Wow. I wasn't expecting the results to turn out the way it did.

For washes, I used only three. Vallejo Lavado Negro Black Shade, Citadel Seraphim Sephia, and Citadel Agrax Earthshade. The Vallejo shade worked reliably, not staining the color much, and yet provided deep contrast. I used this mostly around the chains.



Oh, and since Super Dungeon Explore is anime-inspired, I thought it would be cool to put some manga runes or symbols on. Brain-stormed a bit and decided to use the famous Naruto seal:


Just applied a coat of varnish.. still wet:


With Rex down, I'm only left with Starfire! (.. and seven heroes).

One other thing that I wanted to do was to try out using matt medium which wickedwretch suggested in a comment below. I got this:


And tested it on my Dragon Priests. I was pleasantly surprised with the Vallejo Matt Medium. It really made the previously glossy surface matte! The only thing I was not happy with was it looked kind of like it was covered with layer of translucent white:


Lessons learnt:
1. Matt Medium is great to remove the glossy effect of varnish.
2. Dry-brushing can create really dramatic effect if the area has lots of contours. In fact, the primary color of the entire area will change to become the color of the dry-brush paint. Previously I had used dry-brushing to create subtle highlights at edges.


(to be continued...)


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Session 11


Took a break from painting.. and came back to Starfire! Haha, the final boss. It had been months ago (almost 9?) when I had first super-glued and assembled this beast together. Today I finally finished painting it! Hahahaha.

After my first base coat and wash of this model, I thought something was missing. Compared to the mini-boss Rex, Starfire had relatively less "articles" to paint. I thought as the final boss, it should not be so plain.. So my backside got itchy, and decided to try....

Wet-blending!

OMG! I had not idea what I had gotten myself into. Please do realise that I am still a relatively new painter. If I can track my "learning progress", then these are some of the things I'd tried:

1. Base coat.
2. Paint details.
3. DIP method.
4. Wash.
5. Section wash.
6. Dry brushing.

That's it. Pretty small skillset. I did not know how this unearthly idea of wanting to try wet-blending came to my feeble mind. But I did...

Here was how it went...



1st Attempt
Attempt number one was clearly a big FAIL. I think it was too watery. Some paints dried earlier while some parts were still wet. After seeing the result, I was so overwhelmed by a sense of defeat I had wanted to give up and just base-coat it again. Forget about even trying again.

2nd Attempt
Attempt number two was much better. I re-mixed my paints into four different parts. And tried to mix them up and down the entire length. It was much better and the yellow stayed on. But there were very visible streaks at the yellow end. This could be due to the paint being too thin.

3rd Attempt
Attempt number three. I thicken the paint again! This time the blend turned out better.

4th Attempt
Moving on to another side of Starfire's wing. I put what I had learnt (avoided the mistakes as well) to good use. Attempt number four turned out pretty good.

5th Attempt
Slowly getting the hang of it.

6th Attempt
I wasted a lot of time on attempt four and five, going back and forth a few times. I realised that if I was not patient and change the color too quickly, I would need to go back and touch up... which would be a nightmare. So on attempt number six, I patiently change my color a bit at a time. Worked slowly towards the lighter end. Overall, I had the best result!


This whole exercise took me three (3!) hours!! But after the wet-blending was done, the rest was straight up a repeat of what I used to do previously.

WIP:


Final result:



---------------------------------------------------------------------
On another note, I mentioned I took a break from painting. Well, I finally get to play Super Dungeon Explore! The whole point of painting these minis was to play the game right? Since I got Rex painted, I had been looking forward to trying out the game. Got two games down. It was quite enjoyable. I took pictures and decided to make the sessions into a full comic session report.

I.e.


Here are the links:
Chapter 1 - Ember vs Dragon Lance
Chapter 2 - Ember vs Broken Bones
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Lessons learnt:
1. A whole lot on wet-blending. But I need to learn a lot more! The final result was not the best in the world, but for a newbie, I was pretty happy with it. Still, I took 3 hours. The videos I saw, people usually took like 3 minutes...


(to be continued...)


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Session 12


Had great sessions playing the game. Found that I needed some heroes that uses ATT attribute. Thus I chose to work on the Claw Tribe Barbarian and the Hearthsworn Fighter.





I was not very happy with the results time round. Firstly, I found my paint work very sloppy. Many of the lines were not sharp and I did not bother to clean up.

Secondly, I had great challenge with the color scheme. Especially with the barbarian. I had wanted to follow the color scheme on the card. If that was the case, the clothing of the barbarian would be white, or close to white. But I found I could not get it to look good. Then I tried "embroidering" gold on the clothing. Worse. So I covered everything in white again, in despair. Finally I decided to wash the white in Orange wash. Result was bad as well. I finally tried to make leopard prints, and got a somewhat satisfactory result. However, after all prints are done, I realised the orange cloth was too close to the hair color. I should had make it a darker shade.



Another thing I tried, coming out of a discussion on another thread, was to try a retarder. I got this Vallejo Retarder Medium from my FLGS. Mixed it into my paints. It sure make the paint dry slower. But the new texture confused me for a while, and it messed up how I thought the paint would behave on the model. Perhaps I needed more time to get use to it.


One other thing I thought about doing was the NMM (Non-Metallic Metal). That crazy thought was inspired by this Geeklist. Thankfully, I tested out separately and realised how futile it was. Gave up.

What I did instead was very simple. After the silver paint dried, I washed over the weapons with an earthshade wash. Then I dry-brushed Necron-Compound at the edges. The result was subtle and satisfactory. Nothing to shout about, not going to win any awards, but fairly decent.


Claw Tribe Barbarian


Hearthsworn Fighter



Lessons learnt:
1. A good color-scheme is very important!
2. Need more experience with the retarder.
3. Need to learn how to blend!
4. A simple wash and dry-brushing Necron Compound can produce decent looking weapon shade and highlights very simply and quickly.



(to be continued...)


---------------------------------------------------------------------

Session 13


Took a looong break from painting Super Dungeon Explore... What have I been up to? A couple of different games. At first, I was into Abaddon. Played quite a lot of that game. Created five (5!) session reports, all in comic-style. And one review. Then I got Dungeon Command... And Leviathans. In between, I played more games including Forbidden Island, as well as Earth Reborn.

Finally, after a "tour" of game-playing and session reports writing, I came back to these minis.


I find Candy and Cola easy to paint. This is the first time I'm painting on metal. The feel is very different from plastic. I tried a feeble attempt at NMM for the short sword.. Didn't turn out as well as I hoped.


After a very ugly white line for Candy's shortsword, I dare not attempt a white line for the Palandin's sword. The end result turned out to look more like a simple gradient, than really NMM.


The rogue is probably the easiest to paint, simply because after you're done with the head, the rest of her body is so small.

Lessons Learnt:
1. A whole lot of experience on trying NMM, which in my view, I have not succeeded yet.

(to be continued...)



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Session 14 and Epilogue





Finally finished up with the druid and the angry bear! This session wraps up the final pieces of the Super Dungeon Explore minis. It also wraps up a good chapter of my little escapade into the world of painting minis.

Looking back, it was almost one year (!) ago when I walked into my FLGS and bought SDE. Little did I know the time commitment I would put into this little purchase. (And the obscene amount of money!)

Brushes damaged and new

My Brushes Ranking
I have tried five (5) brands of brushes.

1. Tamiya
2. Army Painter - The Wargamer series (white) and the Hobby series (red)
3. Citadel
4. Vallejo

The best brush in my experience is my single Tamiya Modeling brush HF. Paint washes off easily. And the point is fantastic. It retains its shape even after much of my abuse. I used it from the first day I started painting and it's still in fairly good shape.

My favorite series of brushes next are the Hobby series (red) of Army Painter. They are cheaper than the Wargamer series, but very much more durable. Even after much abuse, they retain their shape and point very well.

Ranking third would be the the Wargamer series from Army Painter. They are a joy to use when new. But I find under the same treatment (or mistreatment), they lose their shape and point much faster than the corresponding Hobby series. Plus they are more expensive! Go figure.

My handy wooden cubes

Ranking at number four would the Citadel brushes. They are nonsense. I will not recommend any new painter to use them. Maybe their big Wash brush. But otherwise, nope. The brushes lose their shape and point very quickly.

Right at the bottom is the Vallejo. I only bought one Vallejo brush. It is the most expensive brush I bought. It was really really good initially. Emphasize initially. While it retains it's shape much better than the Citadel brushes, it flares out much more than the cheaper Army Painter Hobby series of brushes. For a brush four times (or five?) more expensive, I really expect it to be more durable. While it is a very good brush in every area and much better than the Citadel brushes, for it's price, it's really not worth it. I will not buy another Vallejo brush again.

Brushes Lessons Learnt
1. Never ever let paint reach the metal part of the brush. Never!
If the brush is 1cm long, paint is only meant to go up to 5mm. If I allow paint to reach the metal part, it will be trapped there. And it will dry up. Dry paint trapped in the metal part is very bad. The shape of the brush will flare out and the brush will lose it's point.

2. Always clean brushes after use. Plus never let paint dry in the brush.
Dry paint in brush is very bad. It breaks the shape and point.

3. Learn to use brush cleaner and/or brush restorer.
It was until very late when I discovered the Vallejo Brush restorer and the Vallejo Brush cleaner. They are like the cure to cancer equivalent to a brush's health. With water and soap alone, or another other method of cleaning, I would not be able to clean the brush more thoroughly, or faster, then a quick dip into one of these Vallejo products.

Pots.. lots and lots of pots!

Paints
I started my journey with the Army Painter started set. They are a waste of time. If I can recommend a new painter, I would say DO NOT EVEN THINK ABOUT IT. I heard great things of Vallejo paints. Although I bought and tried many of Vallejo's auxiliary products, I have never tried their paints.

The paint I go with is Citadel. Their paint quality is a huge significant step up from the Army Painter. Even a newbie like me can tell.

Here are the Citadel range of colors I got. I joined this hobby at around the time Citadel decided to update it's range of pots. As a result, I have a mix of both of their older range of paints as well as their new range of paints.


Jokaero Orange
Macharius Solar Orange
Troll Slayer Orange
Emperor's Children
Mechrite Red thumbsupthumbsup
Mephiston Red
Khorne Red thumbsup
Exreus Purple
Genestealer Purple
Hormagaunt Purple
Naggaroth Night
Mordian Blue
Necron Abyss
Caledor Sky
Abaddon Black
Astronomican Grey
Tin Bitz
Runefang Steel
Shining Gold
Chainmail

Scream Skull
Pallid Wych Flesh
Skull White thumbsup
Ceramite White thumbsdown
Tallarn Flesh
Kislev Flesh thumbsup
Calthan Brown
Tau Light Ochre
Mournfang Brown
Rhinox Hide
Flash Gitz Yellow
Averland Sunset
Gretchin Green
Sybarite Green
Waaagh! Flesh
Moot Green

Astrogranite (texture) thumbsdown
Stirland Mud (texture) thumbsdown
Necron Compound (dry)
Kinderflame (dry)
Terminatus Stone (dry) thumbsup
Eldar Flesh (dry)
Lahmian Medium (technical)
Seraphim Sephia thumbsup
Carroburg Crimson
Asurmen Blue
Leviathan Purple
Agrax Earthshade
Thraka Green
Reikland Fleshshade
Fuegan Orange
Gryphonne Sephia thumbsup




The thumbs are just some of my own personal preference. I love, absolutely love the Mechrite Red. It is from the old foundation line. It's gone forever. I hope I can find another red I can fall in love with. But so far none can replace the Mechrite Red. Bought two pots of these. Absolute love it.

The new Citadel line includes the texture pots. I bought two of them. The Astrogranite and the Stirland Mud. I thumbs down them not because they are bad. But I find them rather redundant. And EXPENSIVE. The Vallejo range of Pumice comes in much larger bottle, is cheaper, and gives more volume.

Terminatus Stone I like for a quick and easy dry brush. Unlike the texture range from the new Citadel line, I find the dry range not absolutely redundant. They are in fact convenient. That said, I found myself mixing the colors I wanted to dry brush from paint pots more often than not.

The old Skull White is great and a joy to paint with. The Ceramite White is terrible.

Kislev Flesh I like a lot. I bought two bottles of these.

From the shades, the other colors do their job. But I absolute love the sephia. I find that I prefer the old version more than the new one. Sigh. What to do? Once it's used up, its gone forever.







The Big Picture
1. Take it easy.
2. It don't have to be perfect.
3. Painting minis can be therapeutic.





Until next time!
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Looking really nice! There is something about these minis. I bought SDE to play the game, with the intention to just do something simple like a wash. I ended up painting the whole set over the last few weeks. Honestly, even without doing all the small details due to time constraints, these minis are the most fun and best looking I have done. Really glad Caverns of Roxor is a ways off though so I get a bit of a break and regain focus on university...
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great job, I really like the look of the minis too
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Really like what you've done here. As a first-time painter you've done an outstanding job!

One tip for future projects: mould-lines.
If you take a look at the original size of the picture you posted at the start of session 4 and take a good peek at the figures you can see some lines have formed where the moulds have met, giving a slightly raised area where there's supposed to be a smooth surface. For better results with washes you aught to trim this away before painting.

This can easily be done with a good hobby knife, but if you're REALLY serious about excellent craftsmanshif you could invest in some tiny files and/or emry board.

Some green-stuff might also come in handy to cover the large gaps and crevices where parts of a miniature has been glued together.

Take a look at my blog here at BGG for some examples of preparing miniatures for painting and what green-stuff is.

Looking forward to seeing more of your work!
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Great work and useful info.

A couple of easy beginer tips, since you're using texture for the bases. Drybrush them with light gray (I can't see if you've done it, but my guess is that you haven't because they still look quite dark). It'll give them a great rock-like effect. Also, try adding some moss (very fine green turf mixed with PVA glue and water). (Add it after the varnish).

About the Vallejo Varnish, Matte isn't quite matte, but it's not glossy. The white, milky spots become a bit glossy, so you should avoid them. I use a 3:1 varnish-water formula and apply a couple of thin coats. Two gloss and one matte (I let them dry about a whole day). If you want an absolutely matte finish, try using Vallejo's Matte Medium mixed with water (it's not protective, so pply after a couple of Varnish coats).
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Kirenx wrote:
Looking really nice! There is something about these minis. I bought SDE to play the game, with the intention to just do something simple like a wash. I ended up painting the whole set over the last few weeks. Honestly, even without doing all the small details due to time constraints, these minis are the most fun and best looking I have done. Really glad Caverns of Roxor is a ways off though so I get a bit of a break and regain focus on university...


Thanks! Yes there is something about these minis isn't it? I bought the game wanting to play it. Months later, I still had not read the rulebook, but spent countless hours painting them!

scout13 wrote:
great job, I really like the look of the minis too


Thanks! I don't like the paint job on the first 2 sessions of minis. But once I started using the Citadel Foundation paints and washes, things became simpler!

Gormash wrote:
Really like what you've done here. As a first-time painter you've done an outstanding job!

One tip for future projects: mould-lines.
If you take a look at the original size of the picture you posted at the start of session 4 and take a good peek at the figures you can see some lines have formed where the moulds have met, giving a slightly raised area where there's supposed to be a smooth surface. For better results with washes you aught to trim this away before painting.

This can easily be done with a good hobby knife, but if you're REALLY serious about excellent craftsmanshif you could invest in some tiny files and/or emry board.

Some green-stuff might also come in handy to cover the large gaps and crevices where parts of a miniature has been glued together.

Take a look at my blog here at BGG for some examples of preparing miniatures for painting and what green-stuff is.

Looking forward to seeing more of your work!


Thanks! Yup, I completely skipped that part. So many things to learn!

So I read your blog, a few key take aways.

1. Wash the minis! That must explain why some times I find paint hard to stick on!
2. Green Stuff. Do I get the hard green stuff, or the liquid green stuff? I see you use the hard ones, which you said have two parts. The yellow and the blue. How do I use it? I just mix the two, and I assume there will be chemical reaction to make it hard?
3. Trimming. Hobby knife, file, emry board.. what is emry board? These must be the stuffs I see at the FLGS which look like dentist tools.

Wow.. a 3D dungeon! Is it finished?

wickedwretch wrote:
Great work and useful info.

A couple of easy beginer tips, since you're using texture for the bases. Drybrush them with light gray (I can't see if you've done it, but my guess is that you haven't because they still look quite dark). It'll give them a great rock-like effect. Also, try adding some moss (very fine green turf mixed with PVA glue and water). (Add it after the varnish).

About the Vallejo Varnish, Matte isn't quite matte, but it's not glossy. The white, milky spots become a bit glossy, so you should avoid them. I use a 3:1 varnish-water formula and apply a couple of thin coats. Two gloss and one matte (I let them dry about a whole day). If you want an absolutely matte finish, try using Vallejo's Matte Medium mixed with water (it's not protective, so pply after a couple of Varnish coats).


Thanks!

Oh man, dry brushing is something I'm still having trouble with. I read so much about them, but when I tried them, it always looked bad. So I covered them up again. Must work on this skill! You're right, it's all black now. I bought the new Citadel Dry paint.. Necron Compound and Terminatus Stone. I'll try to dry brush the base soon. Just worried I'll make the minis look worse

Oh, I didn't know I can mix water with varnish! Okies, I'll try it.

So if I apply Vallejo Matte Medium over the already glossy cloak, it'll become matte? I'll try it!

By the way, is "Medium" something used to mix paint? I don't know what's a Medium for. Can you kindly advise?
 
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maxixe wrote:

Thanks!

Oh man, dry brushing is something I'm still having trouble with. I read so much about them, but when I tried them, it always looked bad. So I covered them up again. Must work on this skill! You're right, it's all black now. I bought the new Citadel Dry paint.. Necron Compound and Terminatus Stone. I'll try to dry brush the base soon. Just worried I'll make the minis look worse

Oh, I didn't know I can mix water with varnish! Okies, I'll try it.

So if I apply Vallejo Matte Medium over the already glossy cloak, it'll become matte? I'll try it!

By the way, is "Medium" something used to mix paint? I don't know what's a Medium for. Can you kindly advise?

Practice your drybrush. It'll be the next step after you use washes. Basecoat, wash, drybrush highlights.

Yes, the Vallejo Varnish can be mixed with water so you can apply many thin coats instead of one that could hide the details. Don't thin it beyond 1:1.

The Medium is, indeed, the "liquid" without pigments (you can get it in matte, gloss and metallic varieties). Don't worry about those for now, but a side effect is that you can use the Medium as a transparent coat. Again, thin it with water to apply it over the Varnish and you can get a non-protective coat of really matte finish (if it gets damaged, you can apply more over the chipped parts).

Something you shouldn't do is mixing Varnish with Medium. You'll get a nasty, useless, toothpaste-like thing.
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maxixe wrote:
1. Wash the minis! That must explain why some times I find paint hard to stick on!


That, and priming. You might not have noticed the need for priming yet, but if you plan on using the figures a lut in actual gameplay you will. Priming makes the paint stick better to the surface, preventing it from peeling off by rough handling. Using varnish will help with that, but I prefer a double safety net.
Besides, priming using a spraycan doesn't take THAT much longer, compared to the rest of the process.

maxixe wrote:
2. Green Stuff. Do I get the hard green stuff, or the liquid green stuff? I see you use the hard ones, which you said have two parts. The yellow and the blue. How do I use it? I just mix the two, and I assume there will be chemical reaction to make it hard?


I've never tried the liquid stuff. Perhaps just a bad call on my part, but I imagine I'll get things running and spilling everywhere, ruining the model.
Here's the stuff I use:


I just cut of a tiny slice at the end (1mm thick) and start to knead it between my fingers till it turn dark green. Then I press it into cracks and crevices and start molding it with plastic toothpicks. Works wonders. The size I cut off usually work for 2-4 minis. I try not to mix too much at once so it won't start to harden while I'm working on it.
This kind I bought at the local Games Workshop and cost me slightly less than $10.

maxixe wrote:
3. Trimming. Hobby knife, file, emry board.. what is emry board? These must be the stuffs I see at the FLGS which look like dentist tools.


Emry board is an extremely fine kind of sandpaper. It's the kind used in nailfiles and similiar products. If you run your finger over it it just feels like very rough paper, but it sands(?) both fingernails and niniatures really smooth.
Best thing is you can cut them to shape with a scissor to get iside the hard-to-reach spots.

maxixe wrote:
Wow.. a 3D dungeon! Is it finished?


Nope, not yet. It's a work in progress, unfortunately taking more time than I'd like due to family matters. Got kids that need seeing to.
It's not too hard or expensive either. A board of styrofoam can be bought at most places where you buy planks and woodstuff. This piece (measuring about 8x4 feet) set me back $10 exactly, and contain enough material to make 4 or 5 boards.
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wickedwretch wrote:

Practice your drybrush. It'll be the next step after you use washes. Basecoat, wash, drybrush highlights.

Yes, the Vallejo Varnish can be mixed with water so you can apply many thin coats instead of one that could hide the details. Don't thin it beyond 1:1.

The Medium is, indeed, the "liquid" without pigments (you can get it in matte, gloss and metallic varieties). Don't worry about those for now, but a side effect is that you can use the Medium as a transparent coat. Again, thin it with water to apply it over the Varnish and you can get a non-protective coat of really matte finish (if it gets damaged, you can apply more over the chipped parts).

Something you shouldn't do is mixing Varnish with Medium. You'll get a nasty, useless, toothpaste-like thing.


Thanks! I just finished the Ember Mage, and I had small success with dry brushing. Finally.

I bought a Vallejo Matte Medium. Will probably test it out on the Dragon Priests' cloak.

Toothpaste.. hmm.. just saying that makes me wanna try it out for fun

Thanks for the tips!

Gormash wrote:

That, and priming. You might not have noticed the need for priming yet, but if you plan on using the figures a lut in actual gameplay you will. Priming makes the paint stick better to the surface, preventing it from peeling off by rough handling. Using varnish will help with that, but I prefer a double safety net.
Besides, priming using a spraycan doesn't take THAT much longer, compared to the rest of the process.



I've never tried the liquid stuff. Perhaps just a bad call on my part, but I imagine I'll get things running and spilling everywhere, ruining the model.
Here's the stuff I use:


I just cut of a tiny slice at the end (1mm thick) and start to knead it between my fingers till it turn dark green. Then I press it into cracks and crevices and start molding it with plastic toothpicks. Works wonders. The size I cut off usually work for 2-4 minis. I try not to mix too much at once so it won't start to harden while I'm working on it.
This kind I bought at the local Games Workshop and cost me slightly less than $10.

Emry board is an extremely fine kind of sandpaper. It's the kind used in nailfiles and similiar products. If you run your finger over it it just feels like very rough paper, but it sands(?) both fingernails and niniatures really smooth.
Best thing is you can cut them to shape with a scissor to get iside the hard-to-reach spots.

Nope, not yet. It's a work in progress, unfortunately taking more time than I'd like due to family matters. Got kids that need seeing to.
It's not too hard or expensive either. A board of styrofoam can be bought at most places where you buy planks and woodstuff. This piece (measuring about 8x4 feet) set me back $10 exactly, and contain enough material to make 4 or 5 boards.


Thanks for sharing and even taking a pic to show me

I went to the FLGS, and the guy there recommended me this Tamiya stuff similar to the Green Stuff. He also suggested I get a set of Army Painter files.

This tip is handy as I'm still not started with Rex. And Rex has lots of deep crevices! I'll try it soon!

I stayed away from spray cans because I paint indoor. And I don't really have access to large open space where I can spray. So what I used to do was to spray into a box. But that still ended up messy. And uneven coverage of the paints/varnish on the minis. That's why I moved away from the spray cans. Luckily I found paint on versions of these.

Yup, I understand.. family and kids. I just got married. Lucky to find time to paint at all! My wife has been pretty supportive of my hobby. I actually bought Abaddon on impulse (just because it's Richard Borg), and my wife sat with me the whole night to go through the rules and played a game!

Anyways, painting is tough! I just completed Ember Mage. It killed me. I was so utterly exhausted afterwards. I look at the remaining figures and did a rough calculation. At the rate I'm going, I'd probably need another 50 hours to complete the set!

Maybe I should take some time off and actually play some boardgames.

 
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maxixe wrote:
I stayed away from spray cans because I paint indoor. And I don't really have access to large open space where I can spray. So what I used to do was to spray into a box. But that still ended up messy. And uneven coverage of the paints/varnish on the minis. That's why I moved away from the spray cans. Luckily I found paint on versions of these.


I can relate. I used to live in an old house downtown with little to no outdoor room. I eventually figured I could use the attic or basement to spray. Just brought up some trash-bags to keep beneath and behind the figures so I didn't paint the walls by mistake.

One advantage to this was that I could do it even if the rain was pouring down. Also, people almost never went there, so I could do my geeky stuff in private. ^_^

maxixe wrote:
Anyways, painting is tough! I just completed Ember Mage. It killed me. I was so utterly exhausted afterwards. I look at the remaining figures and did a rough calculation. At the rate I'm going, I'd probably need another 50 hours to complete the set!

Maybe I should take some time off and actually play some boardgames.


Two mistakes that you need to stop doing:
- Don't overdo it. Go slow, or you'll burn yourself out.
- Don't look at the whole picture, focus on individual goals.

The first point is simply that, don't rush it. You have all the time in the world, so take a day off, watch a movie, do something fun with your wife. If you're too hung up on having to finish your piece chances are you'll start to rush through it (with mediocre results), and that you'll burn yourself out and lose the love of painting.
Trust me, I've done it before. Go slow and in small sequences at a time.

Which slides over to the second point: Don't see the whole picture!
If you start thinking about how much you have left to do you'll lose hope faster than a brick falls. Instead you should divide each goal into sub-goals.
Focus on one hero instead of them all. On that one hero, decide that today you'll finish the face, tomorrow you'll do the cloak, third day the weapons and base. And if you on any given day feel like doing more, fell free, but don't feel PRESSURED to do so.

My suggestion on how to tackle the heroes:
Talk to a few friends and/or your wife and set up a date to play, perhaps a week or two from now. Then show them the different characters and ask them which ones they would like to play. That gives you an idea of which figures to focus on first. And it'll give you a little time to paint the figures as well.

By the way, love what you've done with the skulls on the Kobold Warrens. They look amazing. And the Ember Mage turned out brilliant. Well done!
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Bit of advice on drybrushing.

Use an old brush whose size is appropriate for the area being drybrushed. You don't want too use too big of a brush lest you accidentally drybrush areas of the mini you didn't intend to. Don't use too small of a brush like a detail brush because it just makes for too much work. Also, the drybrush technique usually ruins the brush for any other purpose, hence the recommendation of using an older brush that is starting to see wear and tear.

Saturate the brush with the paint, scraping off any excess on the rim of the paint pot or whatever.

Then you want to remove even more paint from the brush by brushing it onto scrap paper or a cloth or something. I've often just placed the brush between layers of paper towel or a clean rag, pinch down just behind the bristles, and pull the brush out. This squeezes the excess paint out from the bristles.

Then I test how much paint remains by test brushing a piece of paper or whatever. Your goal is for it to not really leave ANY paint on the paper. It might SEEM like the brush is dry and that there's no paint remaining on the brush, but there is.

Then lightly brush over the area to be drybrushed. If you've removed enough paint from the bristles, what you should see is the raised portions of the mini taking on a thin layer of paint. When you do this with paint a shade lighter than your base color, it provides highlights on the raised and detailed areas of your miniature. This works extremely well on textured surfaces such as a rocky base or even a weapon.

Many follow or precede the drybrusing with inks or washes with a color darker than the base color. These thinner and more viscous fluids seep into the cracks and crevices of your miniature. The drybrushing provides the highlights and the inks or washes provide lowlights or depth.

Just remember this when drybrushing:
Be stingy and conservative with the amount of paint you leave on the brush before application. It's easier to go back over your drybrushing with another application than it is to clean up a mini if you accidentally end up with thick streaks of paint where you only wanted to drybrush. Slow and steady wins the race!

If you're comfortable base coating and doing minor detail work, the highlights and depth that drybrushing and inks/washes provide are really all that's necessary to produce a miniature that is extremely pleasing to the eye. If you want to challenge yourself by attempting wet or dry blending or more advanced techniques in the future, by all means...do so. Don't get discouraged. Show off your miniatures to experienced painters and seek advice if not pleased with the results. Each miniature you paint is a learning opportunity, but ultimately, YOU are the only person you should try to please. Find what works for you and be creative. Most of all, have fun!

By the way, what you've posted so far looks pretty good and a hell of a lot better than the first minis I painted when I first started. Good job!
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I found one of these things useful. Also a raised surface helps the back!

http://www.amazon.com/SE-MZ101B-Helping-Hands-Magnifying/dp/...

Eyes : http://www.paintingclinic.com/clinic/eyes.htm

Science fiction miniatures are MUCH easier to paint than fantasy.

Skeletons are easier to paint than other fantasy miniatures.

I also found out that hobby acrylic metal paints are more than for just metal! I use them on horror miniatures for an alien flesh look.

Thanks for the post! I wished more new painters wrote this way!


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Gormash wrote:
I can relate. I used to live in an old house downtown with little to no outdoor room. I eventually figured I could use the attic or basement to spray. Just brought up some trash-bags to keep beneath and behind the figures so I didn't paint the walls by mistake.

One advantage to this was that I could do it even if the rain was pouring down. Also, people almost never went there, so I could do my geeky stuff in private. ^_^

Two mistakes that you need to stop doing:
- Don't overdo it. Go slow, or you'll burn yourself out.
- Don't look at the whole picture, focus on individual goals.

The first point is simply that, don't rush it. You have all the time in the world, so take a day off, watch a movie, do something fun with your wife. If you're too hung up on having to finish your piece chances are you'll start to rush through it (with mediocre results), and that you'll burn yourself out and lose the love of painting.
Trust me, I've done it before. Go slow and in small sequences at a time.

Which slides over to the second point: Don't see the whole picture!
If you start thinking about how much you have left to do you'll lose hope faster than a brick falls. Instead you should divide each goal into sub-goals.
Focus on one hero instead of them all. On that one hero, decide that today you'll finish the face, tomorrow you'll do the cloak, third day the weapons and base. And if you on any given day feel like doing more, fell free, but don't feel PRESSURED to do so.

My suggestion on how to tackle the heroes:
Talk to a few friends and/or your wife and set up a date to play, perhaps a week or two from now. Then show them the different characters and ask them which ones they would like to play. That gives you an idea of which figures to focus on first. And it'll give you a little time to paint the figures as well.

By the way, love what you've done with the skulls on the Kobold Warrens. They look amazing. And the Ember Mage turned out brilliant. Well done!


Those are actually some great advice. I'm so hard-bend on finishing all minis before playing. I don't know what's wrong with me. I've been playing boardgames with un-painted minis all the time!

Thanks for your kind advice.

Gormash wrote:
do something fun with your wife.


I can think of a few fun things

hskrfn822 wrote:
Bit of advice on drybrushing.

Use an old brush whose size is appropriate for the area being drybrushed. You don't want too use too big of a brush lest you accidentally drybrush areas of the mini you didn't intend to. Don't use too small of a brush like a detail brush because it just makes for too much work. Also, the drybrush technique usually ruins the brush for any other purpose, hence the recommendation of using an older brush that is starting to see wear and tear.

Saturate the brush with the paint, scraping off any excess on the rim of the paint pot or whatever.

Then you want to remove even more paint from the brush by brushing it onto scrap paper or a cloth or something. I've often just placed the brush between layers of paper towel or a clean rag, pinch down just behind the bristles, and pull the brush out. This squeezes the excess paint out from the bristles.

Then I test how much paint remains by test brushing a piece of paper or whatever. Your goal is for it to not really leave ANY paint on the paper. It might SEEM like the brush is dry and that there's no paint remaining on the brush, but there is.

Then lightly brush over the area to be drybrushed. If you've removed enough paint from the bristles, what you should see is the raised portions of the mini taking on a thin layer of paint. When you do this with paint a shade lighter than your base color, it provides highlights on the raised and detailed areas of your miniature. This works extremely well on textured surfaces such as a rocky base or even a weapon.

Many follow or precede the drybrusing with inks or washes with a color darker than the base color. These thinner and more viscous fluids seep into the cracks and crevices of your miniature. The drybrushing provides the highlights and the inks or washes provide lowlights or depth.

Just remember this when drybrushing:
Be stingy and conservative with the amount of paint you leave on the brush before application. It's easier to go back over your drybrushing with another application than it is to clean up a mini if you accidentally end up with thick streaks of paint where you only wanted to drybrush. Slow and steady wins the race!

If you're comfortable base coating and doing minor detail work, the highlights and depth that drybrushing and inks/washes provide are really all that's necessary to produce a miniature that is extremely pleasing to the eye. If you want to challenge yourself by attempting wet or dry blending or more advanced techniques in the future, by all means...do so. Don't get discouraged. Show off your miniatures to experienced painters and seek advice if not pleased with the results. Each miniature you paint is a learning opportunity, but ultimately, YOU are the only person you should try to please. Find what works for you and be creative. Most of all, have fun!

By the way, what you've posted so far looks pretty good and a hell of a lot better than the first minis I painted when I first started. Good job!


Thanks for walking me through these points!

My first attempts at dry-brushing was embarrassing. I completed missed the "dry" part in dry-brushing. Sort of misguidedly dipped my brush in water..

Thanks for your encouragement! I'll try dry-brushing more for the coming minis!

Sam and Max wrote:
I found one of these things useful. Also a raised surface helps the back!

http://www.amazon.com/SE-MZ101B-Helping-Hands-Magnifying/dp/...

Eyes : http://www.paintingclinic.com/clinic/eyes.htm

Science fiction miniatures are MUCH easier to paint than fantasy.

Skeletons are easier to paint than other fantasy miniatures.

I also found out that hobby acrylic metal paints are more than for just metal! I use them on horror miniatures for an alien flesh look.

Thanks for the post! I wished more new painters wrote this way!


I really need that magnifying glass! The details are so small I find myself squinting my eyes a lot. I wonder if they sell it at my FLGS.. sigh..

For the eyes, if you're referring to my monsters.. I sort of like the way they look without the pupil and iris. It look scarier. You probably can't see, but the Ironhide in session 2 had eyes. I drew a vertical reptile like eyes for them. But I'm comfortable with the future batches of monsters without the pupil and iris.. so I left them just the way they are

Thanks for your tips and encouragement
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Updated with Session 11 - Starfire
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Updated with Session 13 - Paladin, Candy & Cola, and Rogue.
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Updated with Session 14 and Epilogue.

One year's journey comes to an end
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maxixe wrote:
Updated with Session 14 and Epilogue.

One year's journey comes to an end


GREAT and I mean GREAT post. Makes me want to learn to paint and thats saying something!
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Thanks for the detailed post. Its a great read and fantastic motivation.
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This is teriffic!

One of the best-written and -illustrated guides I've seen. I'm a slightly-less-than-completely-new painter myself, and an obsessive researcher as well, so this really spoke to me. I look forward to more (and am now more seriously considering buying this game)!
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puzzlemonkey wrote:
This is teriffic!

One of the best-written and -illustrated guides I've seen. I'm a slightly-less-than-completely-new painter myself, and an obsessive researcher as well, so this really spoke to me. I look forward to more (and am now more seriously considering buying this game)!


No joke! I feel like a proud papa after having given some advice in the thread, but in reality, he deserves ALL credit. The entire contents of that first post are probably the most professional approach I've ever seen a first time painter take towards painting, the way he documented everything and learned through trial and error. A lot of people would have gotten discouraged and quit. He didn't, and his miniatures look as good as they do as a result.
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This post got me motivated and I painted like a mad man over a couple of weeks. I had minor prior experience with much smaller scale models (they are easier to do for some reason).

I have finished everything apart from the dragon (on hold while I have the flu) for a 4 player game and I ran into the following issues/observations during my own newbie attempts.

Blood Red (citadel paint) is evil. I had spray painted the little dragons black and these guys took up an insane amount of time. Could be that my paint is spoiled, but it was thin and it took endless layers to get the grubby black look to go away. Most likely I should have thought ahead before attempting a thin color over black. This was the single worst and extremely time consuming issue I had.

Patience is a virtue, too often I started painting/undercoating to see what something would look like closer to being finished only to regret it later. It is really worth the time to look over pictures of the same model by other painters to see what they have done with the detail (even if you take a different approach you often pick up valuable information).

Paint is very expensive, but get more variety of it. I went to the store and stocked up on more colors pretty late into the project. I had left some areas black (thankfully) the different reds helped the most but once it came to the heroes then having the right colors meant a world of difference.

It is not as hard as you might think to return to a model that you are unhappy with and change things once you have more experience.

I would say to anyone thats on the fence about painting with no prior experience that the game WILL look better even if you just attempt to "color them in". Some of my models turned out fantastic, others I feel like I need to do re-touching on but with the game set up they look fantastic together.




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If your miniature will feature main colors that are both dark and bright, such as blacks and yellows or bright reds, go with a grey primer. Blood Red over black is still do-able, but it'll never be as bright as it would be over a lighter primer or base coat.

Also, as time consuming as it can be, you'll still produce the best results by using multiple layers of thin paint, allowing for drying time in between.

Also, get some empty paint pots or dropper bottles, ample quantities of primary and secondary colors, and a color wheel and you can produce a TON more variety through mixing your own than you could by spending hundreds on all sorts of paint.

You're right about repainting miniatures. I've some that I've painted and stripped four or five times over the years as my skill has improved.

For anyone hesitant to paint that has games with tons of miniatures that could be painted, just spray prime them all, add 2-3 different colors of paint to the minis, perhaps a colored shirt, pant color, fleshtone, and perhaps a dab of color for hair or shoes. Then buy some Army Painter dip and dip them things. A little bit of dip settling into the cracks and crevasses of the mini do wonders for bringing out detail and this technique is one of the least labour-intensive methods available.
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Thanks North_Wolf. I understand the issue you're facing. I have problem where my paints come off too thick as a result of over-compensating for the "translucency". Does this make sense?

I think Blood Red comes from the color line. I find the foundation line covers much better. Hence my sacred Mechrite Red. As the base, it works magic!

Hehe, hskrfn822.. repainting models? I'm having a hard time painting the unpainted models!
 
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My mistake was using the black primer on all six of the little dragons, then sticking with it (since I did not get a new red until half way through the process).

I think the lesson is to test on the bottom of a figure (or a spare), before mixing a thin color with an undercoat. The blood red works, but it takes 6+ thin layers to look half decent (and then more work to iron out dark patches).

I picked up Mechrite Red later on and used that for the kobolds (they turned out fine and where both more fun and easy to do). I used that without an undercoat, opting to paint black on metal parts directly. I am considering re-doing the dragons in Mephisto Red since that is what I will use for the big dragon.

My main issue now is doing the eyes on the heroes, I have 3 heroes painted, but I am not happy with how the eyes turned out (I should have planned better before starting them).

On mixing paint, this makes me nervous for some reason. I worry about wasting paint and also not being able to replicate the same color later if I need it.
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I finished painting enough to be able to play 4 player games with a full set. I have 4 heroes remaining (5 models with the bear) and the second set of kobolds, there are no 6 player games planned so I will get around to that when the mood strikes me again.

First off a HUGE THANKS for this thread, I really wanted to paint my set but I dont think I would have ever got around to it since I am both a poor painter (very unsteady hand for unrelated reasons) and pretty inexperienced (I painted some epic scale space marines (the tiny ones) about 20 years ago and nothing I painted ever looked that good. The thread gave me much needed motivation and the feeling that a none expert painter could get it done. So I got cracking at it and I am happy with how it turned out (its by no means perfect, there are lines I could fix and alot of spots I could re-touch on) but the overall look is fantastic on the table.

Here are some sample images of my new set. If someone else is on the fence about attempting this, then GO FOR IT!! Pick up that brush, pick a figure you think you can handle and get painting!!!!! You wont regret it once you see the fruits of your modest effort!! If you are terrified of destroying your expensive game, then start with the baby dragons. In a very worst case scenario you could always pick up a new Dragons Clutch box (that was my idea at the start anyway).






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