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Subject: 10 Plays Later....A Review of Stefan Feld's 2011 Auction Game rss

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Carl Garber
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Introduction:

So as I was looking at the BGG Strasbourg page I noticed a few things.

1) There are currently only 2 English reviews of Strasbourg.
2) There are only 5 people(including myself) that are listed as having played this game at least 10 times.
3)Compared to the other two 2011 Kennerspiel de Jahres nominees (7 Wonders and Lancaster), Strasbourg has gone largely unnoticed.

And that's where I come in, friends! To those of you that are interested in Strasbourg, but are waiting for more reviews from experienced voices, wait no longer! For those that have never heard of this game, continue reading and you might discover a new game to add to your already too-long wishlist

Reasons to Stop Reading:

1) If you like thematic games, this isn't for you.
2) If you don't like "16th century...." as a pasted on theme, this isn't for you.
2) If you don't like auction games, this isn't for you.
3) If you don't like games that require careful planning from the get go, this isn't for you.
4) If you mainly play 2 player games, this isn't for you.

Great! Now on to the review!



Explanation:

The object of Strasbourg is to gain the most points by placing your meeples into the city in strategic places. If you look at the picture above (kinda hard not to, amiright?), you will notice that the city is divided into 5 different colored sections or "guilds". The way you place meeples into the various "guild" spots in the city is by winning the corresponding auction. The picture below shows the 5 rounds which are each made up of 7 auctions followed by 2 placement actions (more on this later). If you notice below, each round has 3 auctions that have colors that match with the various "guild" spaces in the city. When you win an auction of a certain color, you get to place your meeple on that same colored space in the city.



Simple, right? Win an auction, then place a meeple in one of the spaces in the city that match the color of the auction you just won. Okay, I lied, it's not quite that simple....you see you also have to pay a certain amount to place your meeple in the city. Scroll back up to the first picture, do you see those big numbers that are in each square that those meeples are standing on? That is the price to put that meeple in that square. You only start off with 5 dollars at the start of the game, so, this gets to be a problem.

So how do you get more money you might ask? Well, I'll tell you!

You see, there is not only 1 winner in each auction, there are actually 2 or 3 (depending on the player count). Alongside the opportunity to place meeples in the city, the first place winner also gets a "goods" tile of the color of the auction they just won. This goods tile has a number on it which tells you its value (for example the yellow ones are worth 1, and the blue ones are worth 5). These "goods" tiles can be exchanged for money during the "money bag" auction rounds (if you scroll up to the auction picture you will see that each round has 3 "money bag" auction rounds). There is only one winner in the "money bag" auction rounds, and that winner takes all their "goods" tiles and trades them in for money of equal value. This money can then be used to purchase more spaces in the city.

Of course, that's for the winner of the auction(and the 2nd place finisher as well in a 4 or 5 player game). The last placed "winner" of an auction has to choose between gaining a "goods" tile OR placing a meeple in the city.

So, already the game is starting to become clear: there is a spatial aspect of getting your meeples into the city in certain spots, there is a money management aspect as those spots cost money, and there is a conversion aspect as you need to convert goods into money before you can use it to buy spaces.

So, how do you get points by placing meeples in the city? A couple different ways:

1) Mission cards.

At the start of the game you will deal out 5 cards to each player. Before game play starts, each player must decide how many of these missions to keep. For each one that they fulfill by the end of the game they score the amount of points shown at the top of the card, for each failed mission they get -3 points (typical Feld punishment). These missions largely drive your placement of meeples throughout the game. However, there is one more big consideration.

2) Edifices.

Each round, an edifice will be added to the board. These edifices are numbered 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. They get placed on the various gray spaces in the city. For every meeple you get that is next to one of these edifices (NOT diagonally), you score the amount of points that is shown on the edifice. See the picture below:



And those two aspects, missions and edifices, largely guide where you place your meeples.

You may have also noticed little white "chapels" in the picture above. Each chapel awards one point for each meeple that is surrounding it.

Now before I said each round consists of 7 auctions and 2 placements. The first auction of each round is the King/Bishop auction. The winner of this auction gets to place the edifice for this round, while 2nd place gets to place the chapel. After this King/Bishop auction, three guild and 3 moneybag auctions follow (alternating). After these auctions, each round ends with the 2nd place winner of auction "A"(the King/Bishop auction) placing the chapel wherever they want, followed by the winner of auction "A" placing the edifice (which is stored at the bottom of each round) wherever they wish.

So, how does this auction actually work?

Each player starts off with a deck of 24 cards (4 each of 1s, 2s, 3s, 4s, 5s, and 6s). They begin the game by shuffling these cards and placing them in a pile face down in front of them. Before each round begins, players draw cards from this pile one at a time and separate these cards in to bids. Players can draw as many or as few cards as they wish each round, but they only have those 24 cards for the entire game.

So, let's say I want to participate in 3 auctions this round (The King/Bishop auction, the red guild auction, and a money bag auction). I might first draw a "1", and then a "5", and then another "1", and then a "4". I start to organize them into bids: maybe the 5 is big enough to be its own bid, so I will place that face down in front of me as one bid, then maybe the 4 and both 1s will be enough to win one of the other bids so I will place all three stacked (but in a way that shows all three cards to the table) face down in another stack next to the facedown 5. Being that I wanted to participate in 3 auctions this round and I currently only have 2 stacks in front of me (one valued at 5 and the other valued at 6), I decide to draw more cards. I draw a "6" and decide that will be enough for my third bid and place it next to the other stacks. So, in front of me, I would have a facedown 5 as one bid, a facedown 6 as another bid, and a facedown combined 4, 1, 1 (for a total bid of 6) as another bid.

Once everyone has finished drawing cards and separated them into bids, the auctions start. This is a once around auction. So, the start player will start auction "A" by either passing or playing one of the bids in front of them. They play a bid by turning over the cards in the stack revealing the amount of the bid. Play continues around the circle, each player choosing to pass or play a bid. Remember that there is not only 1 winner for each auction so you don't necessarily need to have the highest bid to get what you want out of a particular auction. The winners then perform their respective actions (as detailed above). The 1st place winner of the auction becomes the start player for the next auction and the game continues on to auction "B" etc.

There is yet one last aspect of this game to explain before we move on. Most of the scoring happens at the end of the game where players tally up points for completed missions and meeples next to chapels and edifices (they also get 1 point for each of their meeples in the city). But during the game there is also a way to get some points. You see, at the end of each round players are awarded points for having meeples in the town council. The winners of the King and Bishop auction place meeples in the town council alongside the 1st place winners of the guild auction winners, and the winner of the last money bag auction. Players score 1 point for each meeple in the town council. These meeples stay on the town council until they are booted out by a winner of that type in a later round.



Whoever has the most people on the council each round also gets a "privilege". This privilege is either worth 1 point at the end of the game or it can be used during the game to delay bidding in an auction (so, if I was the start player for an auction, I could play my privilege and the person to my left would start the auction and I would bid last).

And that's how you play the game!

NOTE: One last little rule is that if you place a bid in an auction and win nothing you can choose one card that made up your bid and recycle it to the bottom of your stack of cards.

Decision Space of the Game:

There is a lot to consider in this game and it starts before you even start playing!

After you get dealt your 5 mission cards to choose from, you have to decide how many of them you can realistically do. On top of this, you have to decide how much flexibility you want to pursue placing meeples around edifices. If you take fewer missions, you have more flexibility to place meeples around edifices.

Unlike many games that you can kind of figure out as you go, Strasbourg is more of a "master plan" type of game. From the beginning you should already be looking at the 5 rounds and deciding which auctions you need to win (or at least place in). Things to look at:

a) The spacing of the auctions. I didn't really touch on this in the explanation section but the 5 auction rounds are shuffled and then placed on the board. Likewise, the 5 edifice tiles are shuffled and then placed on the 5 auction round boards. This variable setup creates different spacing of the guild auctions. There are only 3 of each type of guild auction and their placement in relation to the start of the game as well as to each other is of great importance. Why, you might ask?...

b) Money management. Because you need money to buy the spaces you place your meeples on you need to ensure that you get enough "goods" tiles as well as win a money bag auction (to turn those goods tiles into money) BEFORE you get to an auction that you need to win to place a meeple in the city.

For example, let's say the 3 blue auctions are in the first 3 rounds of the game. Let's also say that I have the mission that gives me 7 points for getting 3 meeples into the blue part of the city. Now it costs minimum 4 coins to get each meeple into that part of the city and I only start off with 5 coins. Also there are only those 3 auctions in which I can get my meeples into the blue section. Therefore, I have to win (or place) in all three of those auctions AND have enough money (I would need to gain at least 7 more coins then what I start with) to pay for those spots. That means I would have to win 1st or 2nd (assuming a 4 or 5 player game) in the first blue auction. That would ensure I could spend my starting money and place my first meeple in one of the blue spots in the city, AS WELL AS gain a blue "goods" tile with the value of 5. I would then need to win a money bag auction to convert that goods tile into money before the next blue auction. I would have to either repeat this again before the third blue auction or place 1st or 2nd in another first round auction (maybe the brown auction which gives a goods tile that is worth 4) before I win that money bag auction.

Wow! Big block of text there! Basically, you need to consider how much money you need (and when!) as well as which auctions you need to win. The spacing of the auctions can help you make these decisions when considering which mission cards to keep. For example, if the 3 blue auctions aren't until rounds 3, 4, and 5 you know you have some time to gather resources and convert them into money before those auctions take place.

c) The cost to win or place in an auction. So, after you consider which auctions you need to win or at least place in, you then have to decide how much it will cost to win or place in those auctions. This is something that you will discover as you play and will be affected by the missions your opponents have and how they intersect with what you have.

d) The block. This likely won't creep in until players gain more experience. However, after awhile you can make an educated guess as to the missions that your opponents have. You then have to decide if you can spare a few cards for an auction you didn't plan for, to try and foil an opponent.

So what kind of decisions will you make?

Pre-game:

1) Considering the board, which mission cards can I likely complete by the end of the game? Is it more beneficial to keep fewer missions to go harder after edifices and to have some flexibility to block my opponents? What is the likelihood that I can complete each mission?

2) Which are the auctions I HAVE to win or place in to complete these missions/get the edifices that I want.

3) Do I have enough bidding cards to win all these auctions?

During the game:

4) How much will it cost to win or place in this auction?
5) Do I have enough bidding cards to win all the auctions that I want? Is there another way to get the resources that I need if the bidding for a certain auction shows itself to be to fierce?
6) Is it still possible to try and complete this mission or should I just let it go and focus on getting points elsewhere/ruining other peoples missions?
7) Can I spare a few bidding cards to pick up a cheap win here?

Besides these decisions, you will also need to figure out:

1)What auctions your opponents are going after and how that affects you.
2)Where you are in relation to your opponents score wise and how that affects your play.

Feel of the Game:

Strasbourg is an interesting game. It feels and looks lighter than Feld's other more meatier games(Castles of Burgundy, Macao, Trajan), but it packs more bite then you figure. When I first got the game, I wondered at why it was weighted so high. To me it seemed to be a cross between Ra and TtR: a simple once around bidding mechanism, a simple meeple placement mechanism, and a light "secret mission" aspect. However, you soon realize that this game is tighter than that. It's common for first time players to get to the last round and realize "oh, I only have 1 or 2 bidding cards left!", or during the game to realize "shoot! I won't be able to convert these goods into money in time! There goes that mission!". While Ra and TtR you can kind of plan as you go, to play Strasbourg well you need to have a plan from the get go.

Once you get a feel for the game and the mission cards the game continues to feel tense but not tight. I will contrast this with The Speicherstadt, another Feld auction game. In that game I always feel like I don't have enough money to do what I need to do. In Strasbourg, I feel like I have just barely enough to do what I need to do. This is probably due to the fact that, unlike The Speicherstadt, I start with a set amount of bidding cards and I can choose which missions to keep. These factors give me a framework to build a plan around.

Like many euros, it is an efficiency game: "how many missions can I keep, and how many edifices can I get around with this limited supply of bidding cards?".

So, in summary, the feel of the game is lighter than the meatier games, but heavier than how it appears (if that makes sense). Once one has adjusted to this, the game feels tense (always wondering how much is enough and if you will win a bid)and tight (just enough cards to win what you need to) but not overwhelmingly so (you DO have enough to do what you planned to do).

Final Thoughts

Strasbourg is an enjoyable auction game that gives you a lot to think about. Aside from the mechanics there are a few other things which will add to your enjoyment of this game:

1) Components

Quality components. Good thick cardboard for the money and auction round boards. Decently thick tiles. Good quality meeples. Nice big bright board. However, lots of dead spaces on the board...these can be used to keep the money and goods tiles on though. Also, small euro cards for the bidding cards.

2) Length

This game feels fast and is fast. It feels fast as the game hums from one auction to the next, very little down time during the rounds (it normally takes a while to pick missions, and then before each round to draw cards for your bids). Because the winner simply grabs good tiles and/or places meeples, things keep moving at a good pace. Also, this game plays in a little over an hour. With quick thinkers, I can see this being played easily in under an hour. For a reasonably meaty game with interesting decisions that is an amazing play time.

Replayability is a question I am still uncertain on. I have played this game 10 times now and I am still interested in playing more. I also still feel there is more for me to explore in this game(especially the balance between missions and edifices). There is a bit of variability as the order of the auctions and the timing of when the bigger edifices come out changes from game to game. I can't tell at this point whether the game will start to feel samey after a while, or whether the tension will continue each game. However, I realize that for some of you 10 games of a game is replayable enough

I think there are a couple things that will keep people from enjoying this game:

1) Having to come up with a master plan from the get go (more or less). This isn't necessarily the case, especially when everyone is learning the game, but to play well you must plan from the start.
2) The potential for blocking. This is in theory for me as my group plays "nice". But many missions are fairly obvious and I could see aggressive play coming into things.
3) Bidding deck management. Some people just don't like that there is a limited supply that you cannot increase in any way. If you manage poorly you can be watching the last round knowing you have no chance to win.
4) Mission cards. They are not all equal and someone could draw better cards (easier or more synergy) than you. I believe these are offset by the edifices but I could be wrong.
5) Conversion factor. Some might not like that extra layer of conversion (of course seeing how popular Agricola, Le Havre, etc. is on here, that is probably not many of you)
6)The way the bidding deck is built. It might be frustrating if all your big cards are on the top or bottom of your deck.

And some reasons you might love it:

1) Interesting bidding mechanism. Everyone has the same amount of bidding cards. The valuation process of each auction (especially in light of the other players) is very interesting.
2) Contingecy plans. What happens when you don't win a bid? What happens when you fail a mission? Time for plan B.
3) Can be played nice or mean. With your kids, just try to complete your missions. With your buddies, try to ruin their missions, build in such a way as to bluff what your mission is to get them to waste a bid trying to block you (this is all in theory for me, but a part of the game I would like to explore if I ever find aggressive playing friends).
4) Money management/conversion aspect.
5) Quick play time.

Strasbourg is a very solid and enjoyable auction game. It has enough moving parts to keep it interesting, but is simple enough to be accessible to less hardcore gamers. If you enjoy medium weight auction games, give this a try!

Note: pictures not my own but taken from Strasbourg BGG images section.
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Martin G
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This is a great review of a game I didn't particularly like. I played it for the first time this week, and I think my main issue was that too much information is hidden for a game that, as you say, requires a lot of planning. Bidding/valuation games like this rely on being able to work out how other players value lots, but the secret goals make that quite hard to do, especially early in the game. Also, the fixed bidding amounts are reminiscent of Ra, but unlike Ra, they are hidden too. I didn't feel there was anything clever I could do to choose the 'right' bids at the start of a round, it just came down to luck, turn order, and whether other players' goals happened to overlap or not with mine.
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Carl Garber
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Thanks for the kind words Martin! This is definately the type of game you have to play more than once to get a feel for.....like most auction games in my experience. Some thoughts that may be helpful to you or others:

1) this game kind of reminds me of TTR:Marklin in that there is an easier but more highly contested side of the board and a harder but wide open side of the board. Missions that you hope to fulfill in the cheap yellow and red sections will likely be hotly contested, wheras missions you aim to complete in the brown and blue areas will likely be harder to complete but you will find alot less competition.

2) overpay. except its not actually overpaying, it is what you need to do to win what you need to win. If there is a bid I absolutely need to win I put in a double digits bid. You are unlikely to get worse than second place with such a bid(especially early game when options are more open to fulfill missions in different ways). Although sometimes you will bid double digits and no one else will bid at all. Better safe than sorry imho. Hopefully after the first round or two you will have an idea of other's intentions.

3) this game takes observation of your opponents. As you are drawing cards each round, watch how many cards your opponents draw and how they stack them. A bid of one card is max 6.

Happy Gaming!
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Martin G
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Thanks for the thoughts, and I agree that more plays would be necessary to allay (or solidify) my concerns. I think I'm unlikely to get them though, as I much prefer Ra and Metropolys for similar length/weight bidding games.

CarlG wrote:
3) this game takes observation of your opponents. As you are drawing cards each round, watch how many cards your opponents draw and how they stack them. A bid of one card is max 6.

The problem with this is that once someone starts using this information, no one will want to choose their stacks first. I think the rules actually specify that if players insist, the stacking has to be done in turn order. But that would slow this part of the game down to a crawl.
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Pedro Silva
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CarlG wrote:
...
4) mission cards. They are not all equal and someone could draw better cards(easier or more synergy) than you. I believe these are offset by the edifices but I could be wrong.


This was my only gripe with the game after a couple of plays.
I considered a possibility of drafting the mission cards.

As for the review, it's great.

Unlike Martin I don't think this boils down to luck. There are 3 bids for each guild during the game. If you are planning on needing them, you'd better look ahead at when they will come. Of course it will be harder to judge what competition you'll face in the first two rounds but on the last three you should pretty much be aware of where the competition will be coming from.
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Edwin Nealley

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Terrific review of Feld's 3rd game from last year, the one that kind of slipped under the radar - thanks!

I have been a bit more of a Feld fanboy in the past year, but this one I couldn't decide on easily, and your review will definitely help me think a bit more constructively about it.
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Yours Truly,
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There must have been a moment at the beginning, where we could have said no. Somehow we missed it. Well, we'll know better next time.
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Also don't underestimate the power of the Privileges in giving you more control over winning auctions. If you can use them to come away with a cheaper win than you anticipated in an important auction, that gives you that much greater a chance of winning another important auction you need that round (since you got to save your highest bid).

This game has been a frequently-requested hit in my gaming group since it started hitting the table last Spring. Very snappy fast auction game that still demands a lot of thought. I love it.
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Yours Truly,
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There must have been a moment at the beginning, where we could have said no. Somehow we missed it. Well, we'll know better next time.
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I also wanted to mention:
I like the "reasons to stop reading" at the beginning of the review. Reasons the game might not be someone's cup of tea. Very useful, all reviews could use a section like this.
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Jeff Dunford
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CarlG wrote:

Reasons to Stop Reading:

1) If you like thematic games, this isn't for you.
2) If you don't like "16th century...." as a pasted on theme, this isn't for you.
2) If you don't like auction games, this isn't for you.
3) If you don't like games that require careful planning from the get go, this isn't for you.
4) If you mainly play 2 player games, this isn't for you.


I disagree.

My girlfriend will gladly (and enthusiastically) tell you that she doesn't like games with pasted-on themes (especially generic 16th century Europe themes, which seem to be the most popular setting for modern strategic board games), she doesn't like auction games, and she mainly plays 2 player games. Yet, she really enjoyed Strasbourg (one play) and is considering buying it -- mainly because "we don't have an auction game in our collection."
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Carl Garber
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Martin: Fair enough! I quite like RA myself! Unfortuneately my wife hates the theme so I was looking for an alternative to it....which is part of the reason I went for Strasbourg! They feel quite a bit different but Strasbourg helps to scratch the same itch!(Although for me Strasbourg feels a lot heavier due to the extra planning you can do in it). Is there a game that uses the same "sun" style auction of RA but with a different theme?(Razzia would not work theme wise either).

I think observing your opponents wouldn't slow down things too much as regardless of what they do you already know which auctions you need to participate in...It then becomes a matter of adding more if you see them having bigger stacks. They can do the same to you but eventually someone will back down considering that you have such a limited supply of cards. This is what happens in my games and things don't go to slowly.

I am not a big fan of having to much samey games in a collection, so if you already have a couple auction games that you enjoy I see no need to add another! I think the missions cards are an aspect that might pull some to add this to a collection that already has auction games in it. I am not aware of too many good games that have secret mission cards(that stay relatively balanced). And this is a mechanic that I quite enjoy.

Jeff: I think your gf might be the exception to the rule...what about Strasbourg made her look past all her dislikes? Or was it simply a case of wanting a half decent auction game in the collection for completionist purposes?

JohnnyDollar: Thanks! I will have that section in all my future reviews.

Pedro: I agree. The best planner/most experienced player will win this game(my win/loss is 9-1). That is not the win/loss of a game that features alot of luck. I will add though, that it is fairly easy(a couple of games maybe) to become competent and competitive in this game. Many of those wins were very close games with people that had only played once or twice before.
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Martin G
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Hey Carl, I'd recommend you check out Metropolys. It uses fixed bids a bit like Ra, but also has secret mission cards and a spatial element, like Strasbourg.
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Andre Bronswijk
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@Martin: To get a better start into the game, just try the following additional rule: Give each player one privilege at the start of the game! This gives more opportunities for decisions.
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Carl Garber
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Martin: I finally got to play Metropolys yesterday. Great recommendation! It was on my radar from your post but it took me this long to bump into someone that had a copy! Definitely has a RA feel to it, even more so than Strasbourg actually as it feels to be about the same weight as RA and has more of a tactical feel(as opposed to the strategic feel of Strasbourg). It captures that same bidding feel of RA that I enjoy so much and don't think I'll be missing RA too much if I own Metropolys. Now the hard part is tracking down a copy The worst part is I told my wife I won't be purchasing games again until Sept 2014 so there's no point in me even looking now! Hopefully I can track down a copy then!

Thanks for the tip! have some GG!
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Martin G
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Glad you enjoyed it!
 
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Joe K
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Thygra wrote:
@Martin: To get a better start into the game, just try the following additional rule: Give each player one privilege at the start of the game! This gives more opportunities for decisions.
I really like this idea! Thanks.
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