Severus Snape
Canada
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Pascal said, "The eternal silence of these infinite spaces terrifies me."
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"The heart has its reasons which reason knows nothing of."--Pascal
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I want to play and enjoy this game, but one of the things making this difficult are the rules concerning ZOC's. How have others found them?

I also recognize the challenges of the Allies pounding the Germans, despite the trenches, on the Western front; but that's a gripe for another day.

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Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
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Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
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Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
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Not having ZOCs is weird, true. But it's tempered a bit by the supply rules, which can somewhat limit the attacker's ability to zip thru a hole. That plus at least on the Russian and Western front, you will usually have enough guys to create a solid line.
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Festus Kira
Tanzania
Dar Es Salaam
Tansania
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Wendell summarized it very well.
As an example look at Russian Poland. Only Lodz and Kholm are unfortressed, so a hole in the RU frontline will limit the advance. There are many areas on the East and also West map, where supply will limit the advance.
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Robert Lloyd
United Kingdom
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As suggested above, the zone of control and supply rules are entirely integrated with each other and probably neither would work on their own.

The positive thing about them is that they create situations where in different parts of the map a player can have a great variety of logistical potential so that it is alternatively easy or hard to advance. Usually these differences show up in the right kind of places, for example try crossing the Caparthians with the Russians before the complete conquest of Galicia. At the other extreme you have the great freedom of movement in August 1914 in the west. The rules make these different situations possible within the same basic ruleset.

These rules also set the bar for breakthrough quite high. Against a continuous front ZOC freedom is mainly a recipe for concentrating force as offensive and defensive reserves. It is important to recognise the defender has as much freedom of movement as the attacker - more on the western front - if his reserves are not committed to the front line after October 1914.

The price of this is that players have to accept that where fronts are not continuous (which is often part of good play) they have to take no risks with their own supply and that means if supply sources are on the front line a back up to the rear may be needed. Cavalry, double movement, possible initiative switches and OHL/Oberost all must be taken into account. That I would concede is bound to catch people out sometimes, but not all these factors are in play all the time and once the game is familiar these capabilities are part of what makes it interesting.

It is also unfortunate that players' initial experience is the August 1914 situation which is one of the most unusual and more demanding parts of the game. The ZOC and supply rules actually create the possibility of a historical campaign but player freedom of action is such that it often does not. There are also some tricky rules and situations to cope with - Antwerp, fortresses which are not so prominent once the game gets going. The German cavalry force is also something which will never again be able to pose the kind of threat it does in August 1914. You have to accept that you need to manage it and watch it very carefully for two or three turns - and then you will have continuous fronts and it will not matter. The role of this cavalry in the game is to enhance the threat of the initial Schlieffen manouevre and force the Allies to undertake movements which they would otherwise avoid - probably permitting a defense of the Belgian border.

There is a lot of debate and comment on the initial turns which can help understand what is at stake. I found it very helpful to practice the opening turns until I got a feel for the possibilities. Once you have done that a bit you shouldn't find the BEF or any other major force encircled or out of supply because you will realise that force preservation is far more important than territorial control.
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Martin Gallo
United States
O'Fallon
Missouri
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The only real trouble our small group has had have not been with ZoC but with Supply lines. We have thought seriously abut limiting the "bendiness" of a supply line so that it cannot go around a flank to what would be a "cut off" breakthrough unit. Seems simple in theory but we have not been brave enough (or, more importantly, found a day) to schedule a game and test it out.

Note that we really do enjoy the game and our complaint is a small one that we are addressing through a house rule that may wind up as: "Use common sense and no fisticuffs." (Gentlemen. No fighting in the war room.)
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Robert Lloyd
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It crossed my mind that GWiE does give real meaning to flanks and rear. You do not want to be outflanked and never want anything in your rear. The continuous front is a solution but it isn't always the optimum defence.
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