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Subject: Purpose of the Substitute Counters? rss

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Rick Bateman
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The substitute counters they threw in to this game seem a little odd to me. I can see two ways that they can be useful; the substitutes have higher movement rates, so that could come in handy, and they also reduce stack size, which some people might prefer. But I'm more interested not in how a player could make use of them, but rather what the original intended use was. If either of the two above uses were the intended purpose, then why not have substitute counters for the Germans as well? And why should subs have a higher movement rate? I would think that having multiple units all in a bunch together would slow them down, if anything.
It's not really a big deal, but looking at the counter sheet, I find myself really curious about what the designers had in mind when they put those there. Any insights, or even guesses?
 
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Peter Lloyd
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They are there to create upgraded/combined units for the allies. This is quite important, since the allied units are given such pathetic combat factors.
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Rick Bateman
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I'm not sure I understand. How would that help, since the subs don't actually increase the Allied combat factors? Is it so that the Allies can stack more than three units per hex, thus creating a greater concentration in a single space? I suppose that could be of some value, but since the substitutions can't be made until the end of the movement phase, it seems like it would take a little while to get that really going. I wonder if it might have been simpler to just give the Allies a higher stacking limit (like the Germans had in D-Day).
 
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Peter Lloyd
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It allows you to increase the combat strength in a hex. 3 combat units per hex (1-1-6, 1-1-6, 1-1-6). Combine them, it's 1 unit now. do that twice, throw in an armoured brigade, that makes 8, 9 or maybe 10 combat factors in the hex. Before you were limited to 3 combat factors in 3 units, now you have put 7 units in to the hex using 3 counters.

Furthermore, in an exchange, the allied player can break them down again. That prevents the loss of excess combat factors, where as the axis is still losing full units.
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Steve Carter
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I think that the original intention was to reflect the overall improvement of Allied equipment later in the campaign.
 
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Rick Bateman
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plloyd1010 wrote:

Furthermore, in an exchange, the allied player can break them down again. That prevents the loss of excess combat factors, where as the axis is still losing full units.


Ah, now that could make a pretty significant difference. I didn't realize that when first reading the rules.
 
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Bill Eldard
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tallracer333 wrote:
I think that the original intention was to reflect the overall improvement of Allied equipment later in the campaign.


I don't have the rules handy, but I believe they made reference to Monty's 'reorganization' of Eighth Army to achieve greater effectiveness.
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Lee Massey
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The British began recieving Grants and later Shermans! This reflects the increased combat factors!
 
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