Ahmad Lokman Ishak
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How to make the print on the paper to last so that when touched with wet hand the print does not get smudged or blurred?

- Is there any paper that could produce that result?
- Is there any type of printer/printer ink that works to make it so?
- Is there any thing else that could produce such wonder other than paper type or printer/printer ink? A type of art spray, perhaps?

I tried sleeving but looking for other possible options. Please help.
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Andrew Tullsen
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Laser printer is your answer. I have a glossy paper that I print on, and I can run water over it without it smudging at all or sinking into the paper.
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Ahmad Lokman Ishak
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Howitzer_120mm wrote:
Laser printer is your answer. I have a glossy paper that I print on, and I can run water over it without it smudging at all or sinking into the paper.


So... laser printer + glossy paper? Recorded.

Thanks!
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Brian
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Re: For The Longevity of Printed Artwork On Paper
Laser printers use toner, not ink and don't smudge. I have used a laser 'presentation paper' that is very plasticy. This paper doesn't work for the toner transfer tricks were you soak the paper to remove it. Some of the higher end photo papers have some water resistance, which I again know from trying toner transfer projects.

My current Epson inkjet claim its ink is fade and water resistance. I haven't really tested it. Likely some professional ink product that could be acquired (I know there is because of circuit board project research).

Certainly you can achieve this with screen printing and the correct ink. You can print on metal for example.
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Ahmad Lokman Ishak
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Last month I was about to buy a laser printer, but my wife asked me to get the one with 3 in 1 functions. I have to wait a few months more to get me a laser printer.

Any other suggestions guys?
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ionizedbrian wrote:
Laser printers use toner, not ink and don't smudge. I have used a laser 'presentation paper' that is very plasticy. This paper doesn't work for the toner transfer tricks were you soak the paper to remove it. Some of the higher end photo papers have some water resistance, which I again know from trying toner transfer projects.

My current Epson inkjet claim its ink is fade and water resistance. I haven't really tested it. Likely some professional ink product that could be acquired (I know there is because of circuit board project research).

Certainly you can achieve this with screen printing and the correct ink. You can print on metal for example.


In conclusion... Laser printer / EPSON inkjet + laser presentation paper / higher end photo paper.

Then professional ink.

Recorded. Thanks Brian!
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Brian
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Oh, you can also laser print on clear plastic transparencies, but get ones for laser printers. Possible heat/melting issues.

Btw, Color lasers run hotter than b&w also, and they make transparencies specific for color lasers also. And this I know because that presentation paper will run through my b&W, but may have screwed up my color laser. YRMV.
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Ahmad Lokman Ishak
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ionizedbrian wrote:
Oh, you can also laser print on clear plastic transparencies, but get ones for laser printers. Possible heat/melting issues.

Btw, Color lasers run hotter than b&w also, and they make transparencies specific for color lasers also. And this I know because that presentation paper will run through my b&W, but may have screwed up my color laser. YRMV.


From you: laser printer + clear plastic transperencies (for laser printer)

Recorded. Thanks!
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Scott
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Apply an artist's lacquer or fixative. You can get various formulations for oils or for pencils/pastels/chalk. Those for oils are to protect the oil until it can be afforded the better protection of a lacquer. There are not fixatives for water colours as watercolour soaks into the page as does ink jet ink but an ordinary fixative will still afford protection from dust and fingerprints.

Some fixatives are used to prepare a non-porous surface for receiving watercolours so you could, I suppose, at least partly print with an ink jet on an ordinary acetate. Other transparencies have to be specifically labelled as for use with ink jets. Fixatives often provide some protection against UV (which causes fading). They are available as sprays. They come in gloss, semi-gloss and matte.

Lower quality inks will not last as long before fading. But, consider the time and effort it will take to prepare a certain item of printing two or more times against the cost of more expensive inks and preparing the item once. I have ten year old prints on cheap ink and ordinary paper that look fine, no obvious fading. They see light of day only rarely. If I was using expensive photostock paper and was going to display the item continually I'd use a more expensive ink.
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blaecblaed wrote:
Apply an artist's lacquer or fixative. You can get various formulations for oils or for pencils/pastels/chalk. Those for oils are to protect the oil until it can be afforded the better protection of a lacquer. There are not fixatives for water colours as watercolour soaks into the page as does ink jet ink but an ordinary fixative will still afford protection from dust and fingerprints.

Some fixatives are used to prepare a non-porous surface for receiving watercolours so you could, I suppose, at least partly print with an ink jet on an ordinary acetate. Other transparencies have to be specifically labelled as for use with ink jets. Fixatives often provide some protection against UV (which causes fading). They are available as sprays. They come in gloss, semi-gloss and matte.

Lower quality inks will not last as long before fading. But, consider the time and effort it will take to prepare a certain item of printing two or more times against the cost of more expensive inks and preparing the item once. I have ten year old prints on cheap ink and ordinary paper that look fine, no obvious fading. They see light of day only rarely. If I was using expensive photostock paper and was going to display the item continually I'd use a more expensive ink.


Artist lacquer / fixative (available as spray - gloss, semi-gloss and matte) - Recorded. Thanks!

Reprinting is another option, I agree with you. But to cut each card and trimming it to look perfect is really time consuming. If I rush to do it, I usually make mistakes.
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Peter McAndrew
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If you're going to use a matte finish, I suggest you do it as a second coat over a gloss coat. Matte finishes tend to be less protective than gloss ones, as they have a surface that breaks as they dry to give the matte look.
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I must thank some other nameless person in another current thread:
Use a coat or two of gloss first for durability, then apply a coat of matte to make it look nice.
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sumbloke wrote:
If you're going to use a matte finish, I suggest you do it as a second coat over a gloss coat. Matte finishes tend to be less protective than gloss ones, as they have a surface that breaks as they dry to give the matte look.


Gloss coat first, matte finish second. I will remember this. Thanks Peter!
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TheFlatline wrote:
I use a laser printer and write in the rain paper for geocaching. Stuff is waterproof and pretty tough. I found one of my log books that had probably been submerged in rainwater for a month but was still fine. The rest of the cache was a loss though.


Laser printing on rain paper for geocaching. Rain paper? That will be surely hard to find here. I will try to look around the town this weekend. Thanks!
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blaecblaed wrote:
I must thank some other nameless person in another current thread:
Use a coat or two of gloss first for durability, then apply a coat of matte to make it look nice.


Thanks Sean!
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