Recommend
6 
 Thumb up
 Hide
9 Posts

Road to Enlightenment» Forums » Rules

Subject: 4-player One Turn Walkthrough rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Francisco Pizarro
United States
Granville
Ohio
flag msg tools
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
4-player One Turn Walkthrough

I posted the full start up/walkthrough in the files section but it's around 4,000 words so I will post specific portions in the rules forum so people can find what they need. Much of this is in the rulebook but here I have provides some specific examples.

Action Selection: The following actions are done simultaneously by all players in no particular order.

a. Negotiation: This is an informal phase where players discuss plans and cajole one another. The game hasn’t even started yet and already England and Sweden (the two Anti-Catholic nations) get up from the table and leave the room. Poland and France look at one another. “Well that can’t be good.” Poland expects an early Swedish invasion and asks France to put pressure on England if that happens. The beginning of an early religious and political French/Polish alliance has begun. Who knows what Sweden and England are discussing? It could very well be a bluff negotiation.

b. Action Selection: Each nation has a set of three basic action cards (they are the same for every nation and they have your leader’s portrait on the back). They are Attack, Diplomacy, and Reorganization. You may play two actions per turn. Your leader mat has a slot along the bottom to place your action stacks. Your two actions can be any combination of the basic actions or specific luminary actions.

It’s important to note that if you use one of the three base actions other players will see that you are attacking, reorganizing, or conducting diplomacy (they won’t know which) and if you use a luminary as an action they’ll see that too. They won’t know WHICH luminary but it’s clear when you are doing a base action or a luminary action due to the different card backs.

Every luminary has some sort of special ability and they are labeled on the card. They are actions, responses, or enhancements. If it’s an action you can use that card as one of your two actions on a turn. Example: the artist Vermeer’s “Toiling in Obscurity” ability is an action and using it would use up one of your two actions for the turn.

A response is almost always a reaction to a card or event that happens during gameplay – these are not “actions” and can be played out of turn and out of hand if applicable. Example: The Catholic religious figure Antoine Arnauld cannot be used as an action, but can be used as a response to what another player does. (In his case to what an Anti-Catholic player does).

An enhancement is played as part of an action stack. These can be used along with a basic action or a luminary action or a census action (explained later). Example: Prince Rupert of the Rhine (red military card) has an enhancement that says if he’s included in an action which raises science or art you gain one additional science or art (whichever was raised). You must discard one coin to do this. Rupert could be used in the same action stack with a card that raises art or science, such as the orange artist card Jules Hardouin Mansart. Important: You may use ONE enhancement per action.

All players form their plans simultaneously and place their stacks in the appropriate slot, using a basic action card (portrait side up) as the top card of the stack or a face down luminary (along with potentially a playable enhancement and any prerequisite cards.)

One final note about planning: After everyone receives their favourites and players begin formulating their plans for the first turn, put your 3 favourites into your hand. They should be played in stacks like any other luminary. The difference being that when exhausted, they do not go to the exhaust pile but rather are placed face down on your leader mat. You will have access to them at the start of the next turn.

There may be times when players do not wish to do Action Selection simultaneously, If ANY player wishes not to place their actions (this would be due to allowing players to see if it’s a basic action or a luminary action) that player may call for a turn order placement. In that case, players place both actions on their mat as usual but in turn order starting with the first player and going clockwise.

c. Create Cultural Census Stack: I will cover this separately. For now it’s not used.

d. Create Taxes and Trade Stack: All players place luminaries face down on this slot on the leader mat for the revenue portion of the Accounting phase. Remember that every nation starts with upkeep and half of their maximum treasury, listed on each leader mat. These luminaries should focus on wealth and politics.

It should be obvious by now that you have to use your luminaries to do various things each turn and deciding which luminary to use for each specific task is a vital component to playing Road to Enlightenment. If you use a card for taxes, for example, you can’t use it for anything else that round – not even as a response. If they are committed to a stack, they are there for the duration of the turn.

All players create their stacks for both actions as well as taxes and trade and we then move on to the next phase.

Action Resolution

France starts off, revealing that it is using a luminary for its first action— green scientist luminary Thomas Newcomen (created the first practical steam engine). This allows France to move up 1 spot on the Science track (they are at +2 now…) and also earns France 5 coin. Newcomen is removed (placed face up underneath the remaining science cards) and France immediately draws a new card, choosing a purple Catholic card and placing it in its exhaust pile.

England is next and looks over at France, declares “Nice opening play”, and reveals Blackbeard as its action. Blackbeard targets a colonial power (England points at France...) and swipes 5 coin from the French so the money earned from Newcomen goes into England’s treasury. France must also exhaust a card from hand, but the only card left in France’s hand is Pascal, a favourite, so he is exhausted on France’s mat face down. Blackbeard is removed from play and England draws a military card to replace him and puts it in its exhaust pile.

Sweden takes its first action: The Swedish player flips over the action card to reveal a Reorganization along with pink Anti-Catholic luminary Jane Leade. Leade is removed from play and two new luminaries are drawn: a replacement pink card and a blue politics card.

Poland breathes a sigh of relief and pats the Swedish player on the back and reveals a Diplomacy card. Poland, thinking for certain an attack was coming, decides to ally with Sweden and reveals the Elector of Bavaria and Romey de Hooghe which are both used to satisfy the 5 politics points required to ally. Sweden has no choice in the matter and an alliance is formed. Sweden can break this alliance at any time by simply paying the usual 5 political points to attack a major power but clearly Poland is trying to convince Sweden that mutual destruction isn’t the best choice. Will Sweden comply? This is Poland’s ONLY ally as they may not have more than one at a time due to their negative trait on the leader mat. France looks over at Poland and is clearly not pleased. A blue ally cube is placed on the Poland/Sweden grid.

France grumbles as things have not started off too well and with its 2nd action launches an attack on Spain, a non-player Major Power. France must still exhaust 5 political points to declare war and a red cube is placed on the grid. Spain has no allies so must use its base 8 defense value (check Spain’s leader mat) to thwart the attack. France exhausts the political points via two luminaries, one being a favourite (the Pope) so one goes to the exhaust pile while the Pope is placed face down on the mat. France shows its cards that will be used for the attack:
Military cards: Henry Ireton, Louis Jolliet and favourite Vicomte de Turenne, the Marshal of France himself. Also tossed in is a blue politics card, John Hampden, who happens to have military points as well (this shows you the versatility of some cards.)

All told it’s 14 points of military strength which is calculated simply adding the gun points on the cards. However France isn’t done and declares an Enhancement: Vicomte de Turenne’s ability of adding +2 strength to every card used in the attack. So now France is at +22. France still isn’t done and tosses in three coin. Now we’re at +25. Finally, adding France’s base strength of 9 on land (info on the leader mat) gives them a FINAL total of 34. Subtracting Spain’s base land defense of 8 from 34 you get 26 – France will have 26 dice and needs three successes (three 6s) in order to take Aragon. This is because of the blue “2” on the Aragon color wheel. When attacking a non-player territory there are no negotiations and players lose ties, meaning you must exceed the wheel’s number in order to win.

This may sound like an exceedingly high number of dice but the game comes with 6D6 and you are looking only for 6s. If you get the needed successes before rolling all of the dice, there’s no need to roll them all. However, in this particular case, France rolls every single die...and rolls one 6. Spain tosses the invaders back and Aragon is still in Spanish control. France fumes.

England takes its 2nd action and reveals Banchem! The murder card. Banchem murders an exhausted favourite card and France being the only country with an exhausted favourite (all three favourites are) the French player shuffles the three favourites and the English player pulls Pope Innocent X. Banchem has killed the POPE! France is stunned and has suffered a brutal first turn. Poland is allied with Sweden, the attack in Spain failed and now the Pope is dead. France draws a new luminary, a purple Catholic card and places it in his exhaust pile (not on his player mat, this is not a favourite). England removes Banchem from play and decides to pull an orange artist card and exhausts it.

Sweden reveals an attack card and Poland sweats. Sweden declares an attack on the neutral city of Hanover via Sweden’s controlled area of Bremen-Verden. Poland asks for a high five from Sweden. The Swedish player tells the Polish player that an attack wasn’t coming this round as he didn’t include any politics cards. This was always the plan. Still, Poland is happy. Every country is allied with Hanover, a true neutral. No politics cards are needed to attack a true neutral. Sweden declares 5 attack cards, no enhancements and 2 coin and also reminds all players of its +2 attack strength via Sweden’s Warmonger perk.

Around the table in turn order, players decide if they wish to help Hanover. Only England comes to its aide by tossing in 2 coins and a 3 strength military card. Sweden stares at the England then reveals all 5 luminaries, which total 16 points of strength and when you add the coin and warmongering Sweden has 20 points but then you add the 10 points for Sweden’s base land strength and now they are at 30 total strength – minus the 5 from the assist from England. 25 dice to get 3 successes. Sweden rolls and crushes Hanover by rolling FOUR 6s on the first 6D6 roll. This means nothing in game terms, but that’s a rout! Sweden looks at England declaring, “We will remember that you know.”

Poland again asks for high fives all around, France is depressed, and England and Sweden, who were likely allies before the game started, are now terribly close to war.

Accounting:

a. Taxes and Trade: Each country reveals their luminaries in the tax/trade location. France reveals cards totaling 14 wealth and 12 politics. France collects 12 coin (taking the lower of the two). All players follow suit, receiving various amount of coin.

b. Upkeep: Sweden has a base upkeep of 3 and a MAX treasury of 10. Sweden had played cards granting them 7 coin for taxes but now must pay 4 in upkeep (base of 3 + Hanover). All players perform both taxes and upkeep making sure not to go over their max treasury number. (If they do they may discard it or give it to an ally, as long as that doesn’t put the ally over their limit.)

Refresh:

All favourites are flipped over on the mat for use in the following round. France flips over only two…as the country mourns the loss of the Pope.

All players SHUFFLE their exhaust pile and draw their hand up to 7 total non-favourite luminaries for use in the following round. The favourites are NOT included in your 7 cards. So you’ll technically have 10 cards.

Additionally, if you have more than 7 cards in hand prior to this phase you do not discard down to 7 – that is your minimum.

Set Score:

There are times when knowing the current score tally is important. After the first turn every player takes a control marker and places it on the turn track, reflecting the current score. At the end of turn 1 our game looks like this:

France: 6
Poland: 5
Sweden: 1
England: 0

France is “winning” due to leading on the science track (+3 points), being 2nd on the art track (+1 point) and the fact that the Catholics are (barely) winning the battle of Christendom (+2 points). This isn’t the entire story, as asking France if they feel they are “winning” would elicit a different response.

Poland leads in art and also gets the Catholic bonus

Sweden has one new territory

England has no score but has effectively pissed off everyone at the table on the first turn.

Next up we'll talk Negotiation and Census.

--bill
4 
 Thumb up
0.25
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
John Sizemore
United States
Richmond
Virginia
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
www.NevermoreGames.com
badge
This is NOT a Chihuahua. It is a Sphynx cat. A bald, grouchy Sphynx cat who will bite you if you mistake him for a Chihuahua.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks a bunch -- this is very helpful! I have a feeling you're going to be answering a lot of questions in the weeks to come, but this is a great place to start.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steven Durst
United States
Tampa
Florida
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Nice walkthrough, good to see I'm playing it right.

One question, you had the murderer Banchem kill a French favorite but the new card was not designated a favorite even though it is a normal luminary? I thought I read in one of the other threads here that the replacement would count as a favorite in this case?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Francisco Pizarro
United States
Granville
Ohio
flag msg tools
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Wario83 wrote:
Nice walkthrough, good to see I'm playing it right.

One question, you had the murderer Banchem kill a French favorite but the new card was not designated a favorite even though it is a normal luminary? I thought I read in one of the other threads here that the replacement would count as a favorite in this case?


Glad it helped!

The replacement is not considered a favorite. For the remainder of that game France would play w/ two favorites.

--bill
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
John Sizemore
United States
Richmond
Virginia
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
www.NevermoreGames.com
badge
This is NOT a Chihuahua. It is a Sphynx cat. A bald, grouchy Sphynx cat who will bite you if you mistake him for a Chihuahua.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Conquistador Games wrote:
The replacement is not considered a favorite. For the remainder of that game France would play w/ two favorites.

--bill


Huh -- this is confusing, a bit. The rules say on p. 8, under "Favourites":

Quote:
In some rare cases favourites may be removed from the game by an opponent; you may never remove your own favourite. In that case, randomly draw a new favourite from those left over before the start of the game. You must keep and use whichever you draw, even if of the opposite religion. (Italics mine)


From this I gathered that the replacement card would be drawn from the favourites, and that the replacement would himself be a favourite.

Edit: I see that the Banchem card says "Luminary". Harsh! I'm glad this was explained here before I had to adjudicate the matter in-game.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Patrick Ross
United States
Winfield
Kansas
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Your walkthrough is quite useful, but I am confused about France's response to the murderous Banchem.

The description indicates that all of France's favorites are exhausted. However, the previous information about France's actions indicates that only Vicomte de Turenne has been used. The favorite that is killed off (Pope Innocent X) is never even mentioned as having been played.

How did France's other two favorites become exhausted this turn?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Francisco Pizarro
United States
Granville
Ohio
flag msg tools
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
GuppyGamer wrote:


How did France's other two favorites become exhausted this turn?


Hi Patrick,

Here are the plays in question:

Blackbeard targets a colonial power (England points at France...) and swipes 5 coin from the French so the money earned from Newcomen goes into England’s treasury. France must also exhaust a card from hand due to Blackbeard, but the only card left in France’s hand is Pascal, a favourite, so he is exhausted on France’s mat face down.


and...

France grumbles as things have not started off too well and with its 2nd action launches an attack on Spain, a non-player Major Power. France must still exhaust 5 political points to declare war and a red cube is placed on the grid. Spain has no allies so must use its base 8 defense value to thwart the attack. France exhausts the political points via two luminaries, one being a favourite (the Pope) so one goes to the exhaust pile while the Pope is placed face down on the mat.


--bill
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Patrick Ross
United States
Winfield
Kansas
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for pointing out what I should have noticed if I had been reading more carefully.

Pat
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
John Weber
United States
Ellicott City
Maryland
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb

The Walkthrough seems to be missing the discussion of Poland's second action. I assume they did something to move up on the Arts track, displacing France as the leader.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.