Recommend
4 
 Thumb up
 Hide
44 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Gaming Related » General Gaming

Subject: Board Game Prices and Expansions--Opinons, Please rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Ayumi Hakase
United States
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Like everything else, board game prices seem inflated to me.

And many games are incomplete by the delivery date, with the introduction of so many 'expansion packs', CGC boosters, and LCD add on packs.

What do you think of board game prices? The expansion marketing model from the gamer's point of view?

Do you tend to buy the many expansions or boosters? How do you manage the gaming habit without breaking the bank? Strategies?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Todd Warnken
United States
Harrison
Ohio
flag msg tools
I'm not crazy. My mother had me tested.
badge
Happy grandfather!!!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Game prices have definitely risen in the past few years. I still buy games but evaluate the price before I do and will make a decision not to buy a game if the game play just looks okay or if I think my game group will not like it.

I will buy expansions if I play the game a lot.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Gruhm Axebattler
msg tools
Gruhm's group usually split costs so nothing are too expensive.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Scott Hill
United Kingdom
Cambridge
Cambridgeshire
flag msg tools
designer
badge
mbmbmbmbmb
Prices of everything have gone, and are still going, up.

Boardgame designers, publishers, and the people they employ all have to make a living.

Ergo boardgame prices also go up.

It's the nature of a market economy.

And the boardgame market is not big enough for economies of scale to drive prices down.
9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Ferejohn
United States
Mountain View
California
flag msg tools
badge
Pitying fools as hard as I can...
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I think they are incredibly cheap, both from the point of view of how many hours of enjoyment I get per dollar and in terms of the amount of money/hour the vast majority of designers and publishers end up realizing from the games they design and produce.
11 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J S
United States
Austin
Texas
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
On a per hour basis, the games I actually play (read: about ~40% of my collection) are relatively cheap. That being said, prices have definitely risen. I was out of gaming for almost three years, and I just returned to it recently. Now, it seems difficult to find games under $60 retail.

I would venture to guess that this might be driven by online retailing and designers just wanting more money. I have heard their earnings per game is rather low. So if the percentage points are to remain the same, they can fix that by a general price increase. I haven't had this validated by designers or publishers, but this came from a source who deals with them daily.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Pieter
Netherlands
Maastricht
flag msg tools
Good intentions are no substitute for a good education.
badge
I take my fun very seriously.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I know a bit about the pricing of board games, and at current level most prices seem fair. $35-$40 for a normal-sized board game, with a board, cards, and some meeples, considering the investment of time and materials does not provide the producers with big profits. The main reasons for the current pricing are:

1) Designing, testing, and production are time-intensive.
2) Materials are expensive and prices have been rising in recent years.
3) Volume of sales is low.

The last one is the kicker -- a board game selling more than 5000 copies is rare. The costs of time (first point) and also materials (second point) get relatively lower when the volume goes up, but the market simply is small.

You point out that designers and publishers try to squeeze out more money by releasing expansions. You have got a point. But is it a bad thing? Basically, they only give the public what it demands. A game that is not popular will seldom see an expansion -- people want more of what they like, and expansions provide exactly that.

Now, in computer games you sometimes see games that are released in an unfinished state, and you have to buy a DLC in order to make the game complete. That is something I find despicable. That does not happen often in board games, although I have seen games heading in that direction. Obvious examples are CCGs (but you know what you get into when you invest in one of those) and some FFG titles such as Mansions of Madness. One of the main reasons that I did not buy Mansions of Madness is that I realized quickly that the game could be played at most 5 times before an expansion was needed, and I personally do not want to be forced to invest more money to keep enjoying my games.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tony Carbone
Australia
Elizabeth Vale
south australia
flag msg tools
$35-$40 for a game?! I dream of paying that sort of price!

The Game Shop at my local shopping centre charges around AU$70 per game (thats about US$75 or UK$45 or EU$60)

If I buy online from an Aussie game store, I can generally get the games about 10-15% cheaper than that, but then of course I need to pay for shipping!

As a benchmark - Power Grid and Settlers of Catan currently going for $65 at my local store, or I can get them for $49 + shipping online......

Australia really cops it rough with regards to pricing. Even digital music - it's almost double the cost to download the exact same album!
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
401k? More like .357
United States
Bodymore
Murderland
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Scorpion0x17 wrote:
It's the nature of a market economy.

And the boardgame market is not big enough for economies of scale to drive prices down.


My copy of NCAA 2013 cost $59. The video game market isn't an economy of scale?
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matt Brown
United States
Okemos
Michigan
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hairboy wrote:
If I buy online from an Aussie game store, I can generally get the games about 10-15% cheaper than that, but then of course I need to pay for shipping!


I would be patient and wait until I could pull off an order that gives free shipping. It's simply too easy to add roughly $15+ shipping for an order if I get it from certain game stores. Two to three orders later and you've essentially cost yourself a game. I tend to look for games I want that are around 30% off. I just checked my last order. $175 retail being bought for $116 thus a 34% discount.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Morten Eeg Ejrnæs Nielsen
Denmark
Værløse
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hairboy wrote:
$35-$40 for a game?! I dream of paying that sort of price!

The Game Shop at my local shopping centre charges around AU$70 per game (thats about US$75 or UK$45 or EU$60)

If I buy online from an Aussie game store, I can generally get the games about 10-15% cheaper than that, but then of course I need to pay for shipping!

As a benchmark - Power Grid and Settlers of Catan currently going for $65 at my local store, or I can get them for $49 + shipping online......

Australia really cops it rough with regards to pricing. Even digital music - it's almost double the cost to download the exact same album!


Everything is relative, and when it comes to boardgames, the US is just damned cheap and the rest of us have to spend more money for our games.

These are some not so cheap Danish prices:

Ora et Labora = $90.45
A&A 1942 = $103.63
Dominant Species = $98.69
Through the Ages = $106.92
Le Havre = $82.21
Twilight Imperium 3rd = $134.93
Agricola = $98.69
Power Grid = $81.55

Finding a game for less than $80 is usually when you feel lucky or it is on sale for some reason.....
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jason Hinchliffe
Canada
Mississauga
Ontario
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
CountDeMoney wrote:
Scorpion0x17 wrote:
It's the nature of a market economy.

And the boardgame market is not big enough for economies of scale to drive prices down.


My copy of NCAA 2013 cost $59.
The video game market isn't an economy of scale?


Horrible comparison. The video game market is the definition of scale. AAA vidro games can cost 9 figures to create. The fact that they hit the shelf for the price they do is a testimony to their volume.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steve Russell
United States
Milford
Ohio
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Everything is relative, and when it comes to boardgames, the US is just damned cheap and the rest of us have to spend more money for our games.

These are some not so cheap Danish prices:

Ora et Labora = $90.45
A&A 1942 = $103.63
Dominant Species = $98.69
Through the Ages = $106.92
Le Havre = $82.21
Twilight Imperium 3rd = $134.93
Agricola = $98.69
Power Grid = $81.55



How much of the price is accounted for by taxes? I suspect you have VAT or something like that that will drive up the price.

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
401k? More like .357
United States
Bodymore
Murderland
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
clockwerk76 wrote:
Horrible comparison. The video game market is the definition of scale. AAA vidro games can cost 9 figures to create. The fact that they hit the shelf for the price they do is a testimony to their volume.


What's horrible is the comparison of $59 bucks for a video game edition that's gonna last a year before a new model, and a wargame that costs $59 bucks, and lasts a lifetime.

Unless, of course, it's Wacht Am Rhein. Heh, cheap shot at DG. I lol'd to myself.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matt Brown
United States
Okemos
Michigan
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
CountDeMoney wrote:
What's horrible is the comparison of $59 bucks for a video game edition that's gonna last a year before a new model, and a wargame that costs $59 bucks, and lasts a lifetime.


A video game can last a lifetime. A wargame can be replaced by the next in it's series.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Digren K
United States
Austin
Texas
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Ayumi_Hakase wrote:
And many games are incomplete by the delivery date, with the introduction of so many 'expansion packs', CGC boosters, and LCD add on packs.


You shouldn't consider most games "incomplete" because the producer later sells expansion packs. If the base game is fun and playable, then the expansion is optional. Just because you saw and loved the original Star Wars doesn't mean you are forced to consume every animated TV series, cheesy reengineered film, and goofy comic book to get the "complete" Star Wars experience - unless you want to.

There are obvious exceptions, like M:TG with its forced-retirement system. I've long ago learned my lesson though and stay away from CCGs.

Flyboy Connor wrote:
You point out that designers and publishers try to squeeze out more money by releasing expansions. You have got a point. But is it a bad thing? Basically, they only give the public what it demands. A game that is not popular will seldom see an expansion -- people want more of what they like, and expansions provide exactly that.

Now, in computer games you sometimes see games that are released in an unfinished state, and you have to buy a DLC in order to make the game complete. That is something I find despicable. That does not happen often in board games, although I have seen games heading in that direction. Obvious examples are CCGs (but you know what you get into when you invest in one of those) and some FFG titles such as Mansions of Madness. One of the main reasons that I did not buy Mansions of Madness is that I realized quickly that the game could be played at most 5 times before an expansion was needed, and I personally do not want to be forced to invest more money to keep enjoying my games.


Now unfinished games that require an expansion to play are horrible. The only one I've seen is Panic Station. The game has a booster pack (Panic Station: Survival Kit Mini Expansion) that's basically a human survival kit. I've played the game once, with the vendor's copy at BGG.con last year. The base game rules even refer to cards in the pack, but they weren't included (even in the vendor's demo copy)! I got to a point where I knew I was the only human left. I was alone in a long dead end with the Hive at the end and a gas can to fuel my flamethrower. I couldn't draw the other gas cans, a host was approaching me, and the only way to not be turned was to hand off the gas I needed. Then the next host approached and all I wanted to do was shoot them, but instead I had to let them hand me an infection card. The game was horribly broken, and they knew enough to release cards to "fix" it at the same time, but not in the same box. Horrible.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Isaac Finkelstein
United States
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I don't think they are overpriced as compared to other entertainment options, especially on a per hour comparison. That being said, if the price is too high for you, wait on sales, clearances, and coupons, or buy used. Also, a game with an expansion is not "incomplete".
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
401k? More like .357
United States
Bodymore
Murderland
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
matthean wrote:
CountDeMoney wrote:
What's horrible is the comparison of $59 bucks for a video game edition that's gonna last a year before a new model, and a wargame that costs $59 bucks, and lasts a lifetime.


A video game can last a lifetime. A wargame can be replaced by the next in it's series.


Who'd want to play NCAA 2009 in 2012? Ick.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
401k? More like .357
United States
Bodymore
Murderland
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Bimm wrote:
Also, a game with an expansion is not "incomplete".


Correct; you can still play World in Flames without the rest of the Wallets in Flames expansions.

Except maybe Planes in Flames, because they're dead sexy counters.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael R.
United Kingdom
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I would say that game prices have definitely increased in the UK over the last 2 or 3 years. Most big box games used to be around £25 - £35. Now prices of £40 - £65 are not unusual. On a cost per use basis board gaming is still a pretty inexpensive hobby, but if you want to keep up with the latest hotness it's fairly wallet stretching.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Isaac Finkelstein
United States
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
mjrobertson wrote:
I would say that game prices have definitely increased in the UK over the last 2 or 3 years. Most big box games used to be around £25 - £35. Now prices of £40 - £65 are not unusual. On a cost per use basis board gaming is still a pretty inexpensive hobby, but if you want to keep up with the latest hotness it's fairly wallet stretching.

Yes, but keeping up is both impossible and unnecessary.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
One Armed Bandit
Canada
Surrey
British Columbia
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
opks22 wrote:
I would venture to guess that this might be driven by online retailing and designers just wanting more money.


Raw materials costs are way up. 2011 saw raw material prices spike considerably.

http://www.sjgames.com/ill/archive/October_02_2011

There's one example. You also have to remember that through the manufacturing and distribution chain, price increases multiply.
Each extra dollar in materials costs adds $5-10 to your final retail price.

It doesn't take much.
This is on top of inflation, of course.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Nigel Heather
United Kingdom
Horsham
West Sussex
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb
Quote:
I would say that game prices have definitely increased in the UK over the last 2 or 3 years. Most big box games used to be around £25 - £35. Now prices of £40 - £65 are not unusual.


There was a big step hike a few years ago when the £ lost a lot of ground against the $.

The distributors took the opportunity to hike the price and blame the exchange rate, but the hikes I saw were much bigger than the exchange rate alone would have caused.

Since then there has been a steady increase, inline with the worldwide increase in cost of materials and energy.


But I agree that $ per hour of entertainment they are still very cheap. For example, take a game night with 4 to 6 players - the cost of the game is cheaper than those players going to see a movie - and that is just from one play.

It only gets expensive if you can't stop buying - I have plenty of games that I have never got round to playing - they are expensive.

I tend to avoid expansions unless it is a really big favourite game. Typically I find expansions expensive, often almost the cost of the full game, so I'd rather buy a different full game instead.

Cheers,

Nigel

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matt Brown
United States
Okemos
Michigan
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
CountDeMoney wrote:
matthean wrote:
CountDeMoney wrote:
What's horrible is the comparison of $59 bucks for a video game edition that's gonna last a year before a new model, and a wargame that costs $59 bucks, and lasts a lifetime.


A video game can last a lifetime. A wargame can be replaced by the next in it's series.


Who'd want to play NCAA 2009 in 2012? Ick.


If you've played it a ton and can't transfer the team you have been playing all this time, then yes, I can see still playing the 2009 version. Not every new version of a sports series really updates the game nor does it make it to a default better. I have played newer versions that made me want to go back to the previous ones.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Fernando Robert Yu
Philippines
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
matthean wrote:
CountDeMoney wrote:
What's horrible is the comparison of $59 bucks for a video game edition that's gonna last a year before a new model, and a wargame that costs $59 bucks, and lasts a lifetime.


A video game can last a lifetime. A wargame can be replaced by the next in it's series.


until it's console/PC system becomes obsolete, that is..

I know, as i have owned consoles and PCs over several generations of video games...
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.