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Subject: Miniature Painting - Shades and Washes rss

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Nigel Heather
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I have a load of mini based games and I would like to have a go at painting.

My painting skill is average - I can lay down relatively accurate base colours but when it comes to shading and highlighting I'm not so good. I'm also pretty slow.

So what I want is a quick way to produce nice looking gaming minis - not competition standard.

Things I have read about so far are

Army Painting Quick Shade
Devlan Mud Wash
Magic Wash

Not 100% sure with the Magic Wash whether you put future on first and then use washs or whether you mix the ink with the future to make a wash.

If I were to use Quick Shade then I would brush on rather than dip. Quick Shade is very expensive (equivalent of 29 USD for a small tin). I've read that you can use MinWax as an alternative but you can't get that in the UK, but I guess something from Ronseal might do the job.

I notice that Quick Shade is oil based - use turpentine as a thinner\cleaner. Is this important - I notice that many of the alternatives are acrylic (water based).

Which would you recommend.

I have Devlan Mud and Future already so I could try that on some old figures. But can't try the Quick Shade without spending a fair amount of money - unfortunately I don't know anyone who already has some.

Cheers,

Nigel
 
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Fernando Robert Yu
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I play both Warhammer 40,000 and Warhammer, and have a bit of experience with shades and washes. My comment would be the type of shade depends on what colors you want to use. The brownish shades and washes are great with reddish colors, but lousy for bright colors, as they will "dull" them. If you want a "dirty" look then yes the brown washes are great.

Besides shades and washes, another easy technique (especially for rough textured models ie hair and fur) is to drybrush, where you paint over a darker base color by wiping off most of the paint on the tip of the brush, and lightly stroke over these details, producing a "powdery" look and this is a great way to produce "depth" in such minis.
 
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Nigel Heather
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Many thanks,

Yes I know about dry brushing.

The darkening effect of inks and washes is one of my concerns. In the past when I have tried to use black ink to give a comic book like effect (minis from Last Night on Earth) I just end up with a darking of the colours rather than it pooling in the recesses.

As an example, I can just about paint face details on 1/35 but with Last Night on Earth I tried but without success. So I thought that basic flesh plush a wash would do - but rather than pool in the eyes and creases it just seemed to give an overall grey tinge.

Cheers,

Nigel

 
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Tim M-L
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To answer the question about using future, you mix it with ink and water to make the wash. From your example of the face and last night on earth minis, it seems like your mix is too thick and has too much ink.
 
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Beau Schultz
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If the magic wash (or any wash for that matter I guess)is darkening the base colors much more than intended, you might want to putting on a thin coat of straight Future before applying the wash. If your previous coats have too much "tooth", they will trap the wash just like the crevices in the model you were hoping would trap it do. The clear coat will allow the was to be brushed along the surface into the crevices with much less of remaining to "stain" the surface. A wash will always change the colors a bit though, and you may also get more luck by washing each colr group separately, as one can purchase washes in reds, greens, blues, etc., or even pretty easily make your own.
 
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Scott Hill
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Fenton wrote:
If the magic wash (or any wash for that matter I guess)is darkening the base colors much more than intended, you might want to putting on a thin coat of straight Future before applying the wash.

Almost any other acrylic-based gloss varnish will also have the same effect.

(though I believe Future is known to give significantly better results than any other varnish (I've not used it myself, so can't comment))

Oh and sprayed on (or air-brushed) can be better than brushed-on (because brushing on risks leaving brush marks).

Don't use a Matte varnish though - these have agents in them that essentially cover the entire mini in a thin but very rough clear lacquer.
 
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Nigel Heather
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I've found a few old minis and am going to have a bit of an experiment.

Seen Ronseal Walnut stain at my DIY store and this is abot 1/3 the price of QuickShade. But this has left we with some more questions.

It is available in four combinations - gloss, satin, water based, traditional (clean with white spirit or turpentine).

QuickShade is traditional (clean with turpentine), looks quite glossy but maybe satin.

I'm wondering whether the traditional type which is slow drying would be better because the stain has more time to flow into position.

Also whether gloss would be better than satin.

Anyone any experience?

Cheers,

Nigel
 
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