Recommend
3 
 Thumb up
 Hide
9 Posts

Crowdfunding: Kickstarter» Forums » General

Subject: Kickstarter for "Clever" is ending soon rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Upkar Gata-Aura
Sweden
Järfälla
Stockholms Län
flag msg tools
Aaaaahhh'm the best singer!
badge
Bbbbbut that's not fair!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hey everyone,

I recently backed a kickstarter for a game called Clever:

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2092880210/clever-0?ref=...

Right now it has 51% funding (goal is $16000) and 6 days to go.

I backed it quite early and it's not looking too promising in terms of reaching the goal.

I'm not the creator, just an enthusiastic backer, and it'd be a shame if the game didn't get made.

It is a card based game which is intended to be educational as well as fun.

The guy behind the game has put up some really great videos giving a lot of information about the game, and it has been looking pretty damn professional.

If you have time, check out the Kickstarter.
2 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Robert Burke
United States
Belmont
North Carolina
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
zippy1979 wrote:
Hey everyone,

I recently backed a kickstarter for a game called Clever:

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2092880210/clever-0?ref=...

Right now it has 51% funding (goal is $16000) and 6 days to go.

I backed it quite early and it's not looking too promising in terms of reaching the goal.

I'm not the creator, just an enthusiastic backer, and it'd be a shame if the game didn't get made.

It is a card based game which is intended to be educational as well as fun.

The guy behind the game has put up some really great videos giving a lot of information about the game, and it has been looking pretty damn professional.

If you have time, check out the Kickstarter.


I missed this one, thanks.
Just backed it. Great idea.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Timothy Yordy
United States
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
It's an interesting game, and he does a good job in the video of explaining why he has such a high funding goal for a card game. I fear that he might have put the goal so high, that it's just not gonna happen for him.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jason Santa Maria
United States
San Diego
California
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
Thanks again Upkar!

Appreciate you posting about CLEVER here in the forums.

I'm very excited about CLEVER and thoroughly impressed with how it is doing, all things considered.

Will it make its funding goal on kickstarter? I'm not sure. If nothing else, kickstarter is proving a great learning experience for me and I'm still very excited about the future of this game.

I read somewhere in these forums that people tend to think that kickstarter is this magical place where one can throw up a half-way decent idea and expect to do 50-60k easily. Although I don't believe I am one of those people, I may have overestimated the power of a good idea. (On kickstarter anyway) I also may have overestimated how much one person would be able to do when making a game, driving a kickstarter campaign and trying to hold down the job that currently pays his bills.

You live, you learn.

As for CLEVER, there are 5 days left now and if we're able to pull off the funding goal, I will be all kinds happy (and busy) moving on to getting the game manufactured.

In the instance I fall short- I will be all kinds of busy (and happy) to continue down the road of getting this game made!

I believe in what I've created if for no other reason than I've seen it played by 5 year olds and 55 year olds, and the reaction is the same.
"This is fun, I can't believe no-one has thought of this before". (The younger players typically just stick with- "This is fun")

I think the potential for this game in education, as well as becoming a staple among card games played at home is... amazing.

Still, I'm just 1 person AND I happen to be the creator. I'm sure any creator thinks this way.

With CLEVER I won't be throwing in the towel anytime soon. Afterall, I was able to cross off an item on my bucket list with this game. Patent something- Check!

Thanks to everyone supporting the game! I'm all kinds of grateful for your support and encouragement.

Rest assured, CLEVER will be made!

Best regards,

Jason Santa Maria


P.S. I'm very much looking forward to becoming more and more involved in the BGG community after my kickstarter campaign is over. (Which is a mistake I freely admit to making) Great community of people and I can't wait to make a few friends here!





1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
James Fung
United States
San Diego
California
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
As an educator, I have to ask: the Kickstarter page says it involves cognitive thinking skills. Beyond pattern recognition (which is pretty is a fairly low rung of Bloom's Taxonomy), which I feel the K-12 system emphasizes too much already, what cognitive skills does the game exercise?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jason Santa Maria
United States
San Diego
California
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
Dear James,

Thank you for taking an interest in the game.

I’d like start by stating that I myself am not an educator and hold people that are, in high regard. I am a simply a person that enjoys creating and designing games.

Having said that, please forgive any misinformation I may have regarding cognitive thinking.

As I understand the definition of – cognitive thinking skills – these skills are interrelated and broadly categorized into categories such as: Attention, Working Memory, Processing Speed, Long-Term Memory, Visual Processing, Auditory Processing and Logic & Reasoning.

Using this list of cognitive skills, I believe it’s easy to see how CLEVER would benefit the learning and development of these skills.

Sustained, selective and divided attention are present and required in most any game, and I believe children (K-12) find it easier or rather enjoy utilizing this cognitive skill when they are having fun; in this case, playing a game.

Working memory or retaining information for short periods of time is essential in playing most any game. In the case of CLEVER, it is necessary to evaluate what is on the playfield and how you may use it in your hand and vice-versa. It would also be used in remembering what other types of cards are being played or “taken” by other players in order to not “play into their hand”.

I also believe Processing speed as well as Visual Discrimination is immediately apparent in CLEVER when a player first looks at the hand they’ve been dealt; in addition to the above mentioned- evaluation of the playfield. What colors do I have? Which categories do I have? Can I spell anything with these letters? Etc.

Long-term memory, although typically unnecessary in playing a game, would still come into effect if the player enjoys the game and would like to play some time in the future. Remembering the rules of a game is one thing, but in the case of some of the children that assisted me in testing the game, I found that there are cards within the game of CLEVER that represent an item or object a child may be unfamiliar with. Hence, they were learning what something is, or labeled as, for the first time (the “Iris” card comes to mind) and I believe would assist them with their long-term memory when encountering the object they saw in the game in the real world, and then recalling its’ name.

I believe auditory processing comes into play in most board/card games with CLEVER not being an exception. In playing clever, there is a fair amount of communication that needs to take place; most notably when a player has to state why they are playing certain cards or how they are playing them. For example, a player would have to say- “I’m playing these cards as a sequence– 1,2, 3” in order to clarify they are not playing their cards as 1+2=3. I believe listening players would be utilizing their auditory processing skills.

Of course, the math facet of CLEVER certainly deals with logic and reasoning as math itself is rooted in logic and reasoning. Still, I believe there are numerous other apparent aspects of CLEVER where one would need to implement logic and reasoning.

I hope this post is able to explain why I mention CLEVER involves cognitive thinking skills on the kickstarter page.

Again, although I am not an educator myself- I firmly believe CLEVER can easily be classified as possessing game components and mechanics that allow players to utilize their cognitive thinking skills, and would certainly not want to be proclaiming it if this were not the case.

I hope this post answers your question and I do thank you for asking. I also hope CLEVER has your support moving forward, be it on kickstarter or elsewhere.

Thanks!

Regards,

Jason Santa Maria
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Robert Burke
United States
Belmont
North Carolina
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
substandardtim wrote:
It's an interesting game, and he does a good job in the video of explaining why he has such a high funding goal for a card game. I fear that he might have put the goal so high, that it's just not gonna happen for him.


$16,000 is not high. Trust me.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
James Fung
United States
San Diego
California
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Okay, I can see where you're coming from. I note that many boardgames and card games also work those same skills you refer to.

My own understanding of pedagogical theory is biased by my sources and my experience teaching university. I will say this: while I think your game could be of benefit to elementary school children, from what I have seen in my classroom, middle school and especially high school curricula should de-emphasize pattern recognition. And CLEVER, at its heart, is pattern recognition: find matching colors, categories, spell a word, make an equation, etc. There are other things built around it (as you say, you need working memory to not give an opponent a 3 card when you know he has a 1 and 2), but the core mechanic is pattern recognition / set collection. I'm not saying that pattern recognition is not important; I teach math, and if you can't recognize patterns, you won't get far. But I have had so many students who have been drilled to do "I see pattern A, I should do operation O(A)." They do not stop to ask, "Why is O(A) a good idea to do?" or "Is there something better to do instead?" or even "Will O(A) help me solve the problem?" In other words, past recognizing a pattern, they have stopped thinking.

Computers can follow instructions and animals know how to react on instinct. Our power as humans is our ability to think and reason on a level beyond that, and this reliance on rote memorization and pattern recognition is a prevalent cancer in our school system. So while I wish you luck with CLEVER and your future game designs, I strongly encourage you to think hard about your target audience and what educational lessons they will learn from it. My own opinion is that CLEVER is good for grade school children, but not for older students. I see that you have plans for Science, Art, History, and Geography. If you talk to any professor in those areas, I doubt they will like to think of their subjects being boiled down to some facts/categories to be memorized. Unfortunately, that's how they are often taught in K-12 (because it is easy to teach that way, which is not the same as the right way to teach it), and small wonder that students find grow to find it boring and useless. It was not until my late teens when I read books and had teachers describing history as causes and effects and social and economic pressures that shape the story of humanity, as opposed to memorizing people and dates, that I began appreciating the subject.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jason Santa Maria
United States
San Diego
California
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
"But I have had so many students who have been drilled to do "I see pattern A, I should do operation O(A)." They do not stop to ask, "Why is O(A) a good idea to do?" or "Is there something better to do instead?" or even "Will O(A) help me solve the problem?" In other words, past recognizing a pattern, they have stopped thinking."

-To your point- One of the unique aspects of CLEVER is in fact determining whether there is something "Better to do" than the immediately apparent “pattern A”, which I believe is encouraging the player to keep thinking in order to find the best possible play. Just because you see 3 red cards, doesn’t necessarily mean those are the best cards for you to play.

"I see that you have plans for Science, Art, History, and Geography. If you talk to any professor in those areas, I doubt they will like to think of their subjects being boiled down to some facts/categories to be memorized. Unfortunately, that's how they are often taught in K-12 (because it is easy to teach that way, which is not the same as the right way to teach it), and small wonder that students find grow to find it boring and useless."

-Agreed! However, I think people in general would agree that issuing versions of CLEVER that appeal to a person’s specific interests is a great way to help further their interest and knowledge of the subject; which is all I would like to provide.

-Again, as you point out- It’s unfortunate that subjects can sometimes be taught in a boring way. I think that CLEVER is a way to make learning fun! (The educational value certainly applying more so for younger players) That’s the whole concept behind the game. A deck of cards is never going to be able to provide someone with an education. However, a deck of cards does have the potential to spark an idea or interest in a subject for a person to further explore on their own.

-The main point of ANY game is that it's fun to play. CLEVER's educational experience is a nice byproduct of playing the game.

-You come across as being passionate about education and wanting to make a change. I believe we need more educators like you. I am passionate about making games and if I can make even the smallest change through creating a game with educational value, I’m a very happy man. You had mentioned- “At its heart, CLEVER is pattern recognition game”. I have to politely disagree. At its heart, CLEVER is a fun game to play.

Thanks again for the comments and dialogue!

If you have any suggestions for the betterment of CLEVER, I’m certainly open to them!


Best regards,
JSM
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.