Recommend
2 
 Thumb up
 Hide
8 Posts

Memoir '44» Forums » Variants

Subject: Reduced effectiveness for damaged units. rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Aussie Helaman
msg tools
After about 20-30 plays I have a bit of a problem with heavily damaged units potentially hitting just as hard as undamaged units.

I am fooling around with a house rule.

Infantry cannot roll more dice than they have figures in the unit. Armour and Artillery is cannot roll more dice than numbers in the unit +1.

This is not the same as removing a dice from the unit, which REALLY limits combat effectiveness.

House Rule Example: A single figure infantry shooting at a unit in woods 2 hexes away would roll 1 dice... the same as if 4 unit infantry unit.

That same unit attacking a unit in the open 1 hex away would only get one dice in attack.

Cards that allow the addition of an extra dice, still function as usual.

Thoughts?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Lars Wagner Hansen
Denmark
Sorø
flag msg tools
designer
Any time, any place!
badge
Fingers off, that's my car!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Not needed IMO.

The number of models in a unit does not represent the effectivenes, but rather their moral. Once their moral breaks (= no more models), they break, and are effetively useless.

And how would you handle Tigers, which only consist of one model? Another special rule?
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Robert Taylor-Smith
Canada
Okotoks
Alberta
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Maybe you should try Commands & Colors: Napoleonics. The combat dice thrown is based on the number of blocks (figures) remaining in the unit.

Personally I wouldn't change the way Memoir'44 calculates combat dice. The current system is a good abstract of the combat effectiveness of operational WWII units. In the context of the time scale of the scenarios the combat effectiveness of units didn't slowly wear down instead they were fightning until they 'broke'. Broke as in running out of ammo, food, and morale long before running out of soldiers. Unlike Napoleonic battalions where everyone was a musket armed soldier in the line, a World War Two battalion had many troops whose job wasn't actually firing a weapon. I believe the U.S. support to combat troop ratio in a brigade was 4 to 1 in WWII, it's about 7 to 1 now. In the Napoleonic period for example Wellington only had a few dozen actual officers arranging supplies for the whole army of up to 60,000 men, troops were expected to cook, etc., for themselves.

I should describe how I view the abstract that is Memoir'44. Think of game units as operational sized formations like Brigades/Divisions (and some scenarios even seem to have units represent whole corps) rather than a tactical game,ie. platoons. I blame the Pegasus scenario for the confusion. In addition imagine the combat ranges as zones of combat effectiveness rather than actual maximum weapon ranges. Thus each soldier or platoon of the unit exists sort of like determining where a electron is in a atom using quantum mechanics. While most of the tanks of a tank unit exist in the units hexagon some tank platoons may be roaming around up to three hexagons away.

Brig. General S.L.A. Marshal wrote a famous study 'Men under Fire' about how many troops of a unit actually fired their weapons in World War II under combat. The figure appeared to be between 10 to 20%. In other words 80% of a combat units troops would cower or fail/freeze to actually fire their weapon at every point when they had the chance. Even more astounding was that the chance to become a casualty didn't depend on actual fighting but proximity to danger. Marshal's conclusions were widely attacked and restudied for decades until the consensus came in the 1960's that he was right. American training was changed as a result. In earlier warfare various psychological tricks were used to make everyone fight, for example firing in a organized formation shoulder to shoulder. Thus think of the first two or three figures being removed from a unit as the 'non-fighting' elements/troops being removed before the hard core.

Your variant is one I've heard before regarding Memoir'44 from others. Why does a units fightning effectiveness not depend on the number of figures lost in combat. The problem is a perception error about modern combat (and not so modern) that every soldier will actually fight. I blame Hollywood movies. Many enlisted may be very 'gung-ho' and willing to fight until (as one Civil War General put it) they 'see the ELEPHANT', ie. actual death, destruction and a horrible and painful immediate threat to their life. That's why so many wargames use rules to separate elite and veteran troops from the untried regardless of actual weaponry.
8 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Aussie Helaman
msg tools
I am only using the base set atm where tigers are just an additional tank so the optional rule seems to work... not sure on the other expansions.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Paul Shabatowski
Canada
Stittsville
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I would have to try a couple of scenarios with that variant but I think that this would unbalance the ability of a severlely damaged opponent to be able to fight back. It might just accelerate victory for an already strong opponent.

That being said, house rules rule!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
StevenE Smooth Sailing...
United States
Torrance
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Sounds like you've outgrown M'44.

There are other WWII games that are closer to simulations and more tactical in nature... I'd suggest Tide of Iron or Conflict of Heroes: Awakening the Bear! – Russia 1941-42

C&C Napoleonics is also a very good suggestion.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Gustavo Motta
Brazil
Araranguá
Santa Catarina
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Helaman, you can use de Intelligence and Reinforcements:


At the end of his turn, the player can choose Intelligence or Reinforcements.

Intelligence:

The player draw two card, choose one and discard other, with face down in a pile. If the player used a Recon Card, he can draw three cards and keep one.


Reinforcements:

The player take one infantry figure of the box and keep it next to the game board, in briefing. When have four infantry figures, this unit is ready to fight and, in beginning of the next turn, the unit can enter in the game, in the rear of the board, in back row. The unit can enter in the game board moving one hex and fighting or moving two hex and not fighting.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Robert Taylor-Smith
Canada
Okotoks
Alberta
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
gusxokleng wrote:

Reinforcements:

The player take one infantry figure of the box and keep it next to the game board, in briefing. When have four infantry figures, this unit is ready to fight and, in beginning of the next turn, the unit can enter in the game, in the rear of the board, in back row. The unit can enter in the game board moving one hex and fighting or moving two hex and not fighting.


The above is very close to the way Reinforcements are handled in the Campaign Books.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.