David C
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First off, I realize everyone has their favorite games, and I don't mean to bemoan people's choices or anything of that nature.

It's just that, I've noticed people get really into trick taking games.

Phase 10. Canasta. Tichu. Rummy.

"Have you guys played phase 10? Oh man, it's great!"

"We should play Canasta!"

...and Tichu has 65,598 plays.

Whereas, it seems like every other game out there, we aren't propositioned by friends and family so much.

So I have to ask, is there like an overall endorphin rush in completing a trick? Is there something that speaks to people with trick taking games?

I don't mean to sound accusatory, but it's an interesting phenomena with the amount of evangelism that seems to take place around trick taking games.

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Jimmy Smith
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Re: Religious fervor over trick-taking games? What have you noticed within yourself or others?
I think it has more to do with the fact that trick taking games play rather quickly (so a huge time investment is not necessary), and also the fact that despite being simple to learn/teach, there can be a steady learning curve in how to play effectively without requiring a lot of work.
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Rusty McFisticuffs
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Re: Religious fervor over trick-taking games? What have you noticed within yourself or others?
bippi wrote:
So I have to ask, is there like an overall endorphin rush in completing a trick? Is there something that speaks to people with trick taking games?

I don't mean to sound accusatory, but it's an interesting phenomena with the amount of evangelism that seems to take place around trick taking games.

I don't know whether this has anything to do with your question, but several times I've had trick-taking games like Wizard or Euchre kick the crap out of more complex games, in terms of laughter, trash-talking, and general fun-per-minute.
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Re: Religious fervor over trick-taking games? What have you noticed within yourself or others?
bippi wrote:


So I have to ask, is there like an overall endorphin rush in completing a trick? Is there something that speaks to people with trick taking games?

I don't mean to sound accusatory, but it's an interesting phenomena with the amount of evangelism that seems to take place around trick taking games.



It's more like multiple endorphin rushes one after another from taking trick after trick from the other suckers, laughing like a fiend. devil Seriously, there is something really satisfying about making a good contract in bridge for example. And it takes so little time even when you lose one. I found bridge extremely addictive.
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Ryan Langewisch
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Re: Religious fervor over trick-taking games? What have you noticed within yourself or others?
As far as card games go, I'd say it's a pretty solid mechanic/mechanism. And I think it's popularity speaks to that.
 
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Re: Religious fervor over trick-taking games? What have you noticed within yourself or others?
On the flip side I find that it is difficult to get many people to play trick taking games. The learning curve on some of them is significant.
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Scott Nelson
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Re: Religious fervor over trick-taking games? What have you noticed within yourself or others?
I get sick of another trick taking game. It has to be quite unique for me to want to try something that gives hearts or spades a run for the money. Trick taking games are not a difficult game to design if you don't add much to it, and it shows with some of the trick-takers out there. Richard Borg has a new one, but he adds a board and special abilities and new scoring. That is about what it takes for me to jump in on a new trick-taking game.
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Ron
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Re: Religious fervor over trick-taking games? What have you noticed within yourself or others?
The only ones I play is Tichu (with 4 players) and Wizard (with 5 or 6).

My group likes to play them at the end of our game evenings (which is around 2 AM in the morning). As we usually prefer heavy games, these small games are welcome sundowners before going to bed. meeple

And I have to add: we really like both games. Although there is no religios fervor involved, it's simply evaluating your given hand and making the best out of it. If it doesn't work out as have expected, you can blame it on the cards; if it runs smooth - it's because of your superior play!

A win-win game
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David
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Re: Religious fervor over trick-taking games? What have you noticed within yourself or others?
First off Phase 10 is not a trick taking game - it's a Rummy style game. You probably mean "traditional"-style card games.

Like others said these games are very fast. A round takes a couple of minutes but you can also play much longer matches. They also need very little materials so they are great travel games. Whether you want to kill 5 minutes on a ski gondola or a couple of hours stuck somewhere you can do that with the same game.

There's quite a bit you can learn to improve your game but at the same time none of that requires particularly much brain time. So it's easy to chat or trash talk while playing making them pretty casual games.

Also many of them are team games. Canasta, Jass, Tichu, Bridge are all predominantly played in partnerships which adds a huge layer of diversity, strategy and interaction to the affair. Whether you battle your "old nemesis" each week, measure your team against others in tournaments, or play with new people and getting to know their play style. Each of that can be a significant part of your motivation to play that game.

Finally there's a cultural element. (At least) Over here in Switzerland there's a big tradition of playing card games - specifically Jass. It has decreased somewhat over the recent years but up to my generation more or less everyone was taught that game at some point: by their parents, grand-parents or if they were male during their army service. We've got a bi-weekly show that's broadcast on national television and during summer there's a second weekly one. My point is: lots of people know that game, a lot more than those who play games like Settlers. And more importantly many of them don't know games like Settlers.

If I only knew my favorite game and had fun with it regularly for years, I'd probably be very enthusiastic about it too.
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Re: Religious fervor over trick-taking games? What have you noticed within yourself or others?
she2 wrote:
bippi wrote:


So I have to ask, is there like an overall endorphin rush in completing a trick? Is there something that speaks to people with trick taking games?

I don't mean to sound accusatory, but it's an interesting phenomena with the amount of evangelism that seems to take place around trick taking games.



It's more like multiple endorphin rushes one after another from taking trick after trick from the other suckers, laughing like a fiend. devil Seriously, there is something really satisfying about making a good contract in bridge for example. And it takes so little time even when you lose one. I found bridge extremely addictive.


Looking forward to trying it one day.
 
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Re: Religious fervor over trick-taking games? What have you noticed within yourself or others?
bippi wrote:

Phase 10. Canasta. Tichu. Rummy.


None of these are trick-taking games. Phase 10, Canasta and Rummy are rummy games, and Tichu is a climbing game. A trick-taking game consists of tricks so that every player plays one card to the trick, and then someone wins the trick and starts the next one.

Historically, a huge majority of all card games have been trick-taking games, and I have wondered why. It is a good playing mechanism, but IMO it is not clearly superior to, say, rummy mechanism, climbing game mechanism or even cribbage mechanism,.
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Scott Russell
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Re: Religious fervor over trick-taking games? What have you noticed within yourself or others?
Bridge, sheepshead and euchre have consumed a significant amount of my gaming hours. Growing up, bridge was our family's go-to game. We also played some euchre, pinochle and 500, but bridge was usually first choice. (Rook was also played, but not by me due to color issues.) We also played Canasta, Aggravation (Uno with regular deck before Uno was invented) and multiple/combat solitare.

I learned sheepshead (five handed) in college and it was the card game of my Milwaukee crowd.

Euchre is the game anyone can play and being drunk doesn't significantly affect performance.

Of these, I think bridge is particularly elegant and I say this without ever having even played duplicate that takes it to another level. But it takes a lot of time to even get up to competent, so I've not been able to develop opponents.

Sheepshead is a great game that is much more accessible than bridge, while maintaining a lot more depth than euchre. I really wish it were the game here in Michigan, but this is firmly euchre country.
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Enrico Viglino
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Re: Religious fervor over trick-taking games? What have you noticed within yourself or others?
I cut my teeth on our family's variant of Oh Hell (scoring
changes to reward risk taking) - still a favorite.
From there, bridge, 500, hearts
and spades followed quickly - though really only bridge kept it's
interest (500 was ok in three - but Tri-Corner rat F**k is
more fun, IMO). In college, Pitch became a favorite, though I'd
play Euchre, or Pinochle on occasion, they never impressed.

Ah, and Chaos Hearts. What an invention! As with Tarot Hell
(the major arcana are always trump).

Gotta agree with Rusty (above) though - if I want a lot of
good significant decisions, and the potential for more fun,
these games manage better than almost all commercial ones.
They also have the advantage of being easy to teach - just
about anyone can pick them up.

The availability of good card games like these are a part
of what shocks me as to why light euros exist - they seem to sit
in the same realm (length, relevant fast decisions). Basically
filler games that can be played at lunch, or between longer
things. They also, by not pretending to represent anything,
don't leave one feeling cheated by false representations.
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David C
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Punainen Nörtti wrote:
bippi wrote:

Phase 10. Canasta. Tichu. Rummy.


None of these are trick-taking games. Phase 10, Canasta and Rummy are rummy games, and Tichu is a climbing game. A trick-taking game consists of tricks so that every player plays one card to the trick, and then someone wins the trick and starts the next one.

Historically, a huge majority of all card games have been trick-taking games, and I have wondered why. It is a good playing mechanism, but IMO it is not clearly superior to, say, rummy mechanism, climbing game mechanism or even cribbage mechanism,.


If it helps the folks that care about the distinction, I put trick-taking in quotes to sort of signify that it it's what I'm talking about, not not what it actually is.

 
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Gary Heidenreich
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Two people: Haggis (not really trick taking but I find that climbing games have a very similar feel to them)

Three people: Sheepshead, Lexio (Climbing), Was Sticht?

Four people: Somerset, Tichu, Lexio, Spades, Was Sticht?, Turn the Tide (I play too little of this fine game). I enjoy the partnership of Somerset/Tichu/Spades

Five people: Sheepshead, Mu, Lexio (Sheepshead and Mu are varired partnership games)

Six people: Sheepshead (dealer sits), Mu

Just my preferences on Trick Taking/Climbing games. I've been playing Sheepshead and Somerset since I was 11 or 12.
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