Recommend
1 
 Thumb up
 Hide
4 Posts

Power Grid» Forums » Sessions

Subject: East Coast Power? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Robert Stenseng
United States
Duluth
Minnesota
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
We played Power Grid using the US map. There were 6 players, most of us having played twice before with one player, Derrick, new to the game.

We rolled dice and I got to select first. If Power Grid has a weakness, it is this. I was able to select New York as my starting city. This is by a good margin the best position on the board with a clear and cheap corridor for expansion up and down the east coast. Jamin was next and selected Raleigh. Next was Rick in Duluth. Chris placed in Red and Mark in purple. The SW and California thus was not used. Derrick, who placed last was able to double up in green by placing his starting city in Savanna. The main drawback to the seaboard is that, especially with 6 players it gets crowded quickly. This to some degree mitigates the advantages of being there.

The East coast was pretty crowded and in Step 1 this was the story of the game. Derrick, savy for a new player, expanded upward along the coast blocking Jamin in Raleigh from expanding down. Chris was not aggressive in expanding eastward so Florida was secure. I also expanded south first into Washington planning on getting Boston last. Jamin pinned in on two sides leapt to Cincinatti and due to turn order and Ricks expansion from Duluth to Buffalo outmanuevered me and got into Boston before me. I was stuck at 4 cities and unable to build for a turn or two to expand to 6. Fortunately this didn't last long as Chris and Derrick were both able to build to 6 quickly and uncage me.

Important, though, in those turns was that I was able to skip buying a power plant and stockpiled both resources and cash for the turn I was freed up by moving into Step 2 which allows 2 players per city. When this happened, I was ready and expanding quickly southwards. Further, I had the cash and resources to allow me to cherry pick the Power Plants as they came up. I was able to land a 4 city Windfarm and 5 city Nuclear Plant and finally the 7 city Garbage burner to round out my set in Step 3.

Step 2 and 3 was neck and neck all the way, with Derrick, Chris, and I leading the way. Jamin stayed even for a time but was unable to expand southward initially and had to compete for space in the center of the board after completing the NE seaboard. Rick was bogged down in the Upper Midwest and moving slowly towards Seattle, too costly and inefficient. Mark made a run south down the Mississippi but divided his energy competing with Jamin, Chris, Rick, and finally Derrick for the center of the board. This became to difficult for all concerned, though Derrick and Chris fared best in the jockying for position.

Derrick, Chris, and I reached 11 cities in the same turn with the endgame happening at 14 cities. No one had built more than two cities in a turn the entire game. Derrick, new to the game, banked on having another turn. Chris planned well and could power 17 cities with his plants, but was highest in the turn order and burned coal and oil in his plants. He was forced to buy quite a bit of expensive raw materials in this phase. I had wind, nukes, and garbage. I had banked a uranium from the previous turn and had only to buy 3 garbage. This was the difference.

Derrick thought he had another turn and was able to build only 2 cities going to 13. He was well set up with wind, fusion, and the super efficient oil/coal burner. Chris had to spend to much on raw materials and was about 15 electros short of building 4 cities. He built 3 and went to 14 cities which would end the game, dooming Derrick. I was able to build 4 cities to go up to 15 with just 4 electros to spare and guaranty the win.

I want to say that it's crucial to be on the eastern seaboard, but Chris was able to do very well in the central south despite never expanding into Florida or onto the coast. Had turn order or resources gone differently he might well have won. The seaboard was very cramped for both Jamin and I. We both suffered setbacks in Step 1 and Jamin's troubles unlike mine didn't end in Step 2. There is a lot of manuevering here and a player should be very concious of their place in the turn order in terms of builds and buying resources in order to succeed. Don't overspend for powerplants and be concious of what other people are burning before buying the huge coal, oil, or even garbage burners.

Final scores:
Rob 15
Chris 14
Derrick 13
Jamin 11
Rick 9 (with 14 Electros as the tie breaker)
Mark 9 (with 9 Electros)

Power Grid is a deep, complex, and very fun boardgame. Our game lasted about 3 and a half hours. This includes the time spent going over the rules with Derrick who did very well in a game that is particularly hard on new players. With 6 experienced players the game could easily be brought down to between 120 and 150 minutes. For a game with such depth and strategy this is a great time. We'll play this one many, many, more times.

Rob
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Phillip Lerche
United States
Unspecified
Ohio
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
rbstens wrote:


We rolled dice and I got to select first. If Power Grid has a weakness, it is this. I was able to select New York as my starting city. This is by a good margin the best position on the board with a clear and cheap corridor for expansion up and down the east coast.
Rob


Great sesssion report, but the above statement confused me. Sure, turn order is random for the first power plant auction, but the first placement is based on the rearranged turn order after the first auction. Your statement makes me think that you didn't change the order after the first auction??

Phillip
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Robert Stenseng
United States
Duluth
Minnesota
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I shouldn't have doubted the designers of such a great game. You're right on. We missed that one. Like many other games we just placed a starting city and then started the game rather than going through the turn order without a starting city as the rules clearly state.

This means that the person who buys the cheapest most inefficent power plant will get the benefit of choosing their starting location and is another great balancing factor.

So then the question is, is it a bigger advantage to buy the 3 or 4 power plant and then get 1st or 2nd choice of placement or sandbag and hope to get a reasonably efficient 2 city plant? Also this means that the 3 or 4 plant might get bid up! Brilliant.

Thanks! This makes the starting location choice much more palatable.

Rob
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Phillip Lerche
United States
Unspecified
Ohio
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
I agree with you that the game is a brilliant design.

The 4 often sees competitive bidding (probably the highest I've seen it go for is 8). the 3 is really by comparison horrible, considering the low availability of oil in step 1, so I've never seen it bid up. In 5-6 player it is often taken, but usually I see the 4,8,5,10 go earlier, sometimes the 9. If players take the 7 and 3 then they are really screwing each other while the other players are more efficient.

The benefit to the 3 is being last in the turn order - better placement and an increased chance of a juicy plant dropping out for you in 5-6 player, and to a lesser degree in 4 player. Overall 4 is probably better.

Be interesting to see how your next game goes - should be a touch more even

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.