Recommend
5 
 Thumb up
 Hide
12 Posts

Abstract Games» Forums » General

Subject: Apologies rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Rey Alicea
United States
New Jersey
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hi everyone,

A couple of days ago I sent out geek mail to a few members who I'd like to apologize to openly. My intention was not to spam you I was simply looking for an open discussion or critique. Obviously now the way I went about this was wrong and won't happen again. Once again my sincerest apologies.

Thanks
Rey
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Robert Wesley
Nepal
Aberdeen
Washington
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mb
Well, just 'remember': "there is NO crycrycry in Baseball NOR 'Abstracts' over 'spilt' "ilk"! shake *Milk*, on the other hand, were JUST 'fine'!" thumbsupmeeple
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ted Spencer
United States
Lake in the Hills
Illinois
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
reyalicea wrote:
... I was simply looking for an open discussion or critique.
Well, you've come to the right place. What would you like us to discuss and critique?

2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Rey Alicea
United States
New Jersey
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hi Ted,

I do have a question on how many types of circular board geometries have you seen.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Robert Wesley
Nepal
Aberdeen
Washington
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mb
Re: Apologies Acceptable yet
Did you mean "Like" a 'Chinese Checkers' board layout? What about off-set 'square' to where it created a HEXAGON pattern with them too? whistle
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Rey Alicea
United States
New Jersey
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hi Robert,

You see I'm trying to find a board geometry that cancels out an advantage of using the corners to pin your opponent. The only thing that comes to mind is a toroid shape.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ted Spencer
United States
Lake in the Hills
Illinois
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
reyalicea wrote:
...I'm trying to find a board geometry that cancels out an advantage of using the corners to pin your opponent...
This assumes the game rules have a pinning mechanism. One way to deal with this is to change the rules.

I don't play many abstracts, so I haven't seen many circular boards. Cir*Kis and Hamsterrolle come to mind.

But I think you are imagining a game already. A game with specific pieces and movement rules: square to square, hex to hex, point to point, across a line. I don't know.

Because I don't know the problem, I can't tell whether answering "How many circular geometries have you seen?" will solve that problem, but I'm guessing it won't.

Asking "what kind of board geometry cancels out an advantage of using the corners to pin your opponent?" does sound like it addresses a particular problem. However, there are so many undisclosed particulars, I'm not sure what an answer would look like.

So, here's my response: if you're working on a game and should not reveal its particulars, then you were right in the first place to ask privately. To protect your game idea, you don't want to discuss it in an open forum.

However, if you're just thinking generally, and would like a discussion about board shapes that cancel out pinning opponent's pieces in corners, and you must limit the discussion to board shapes, then I would like to know more of the limitations placed on pieces, how they are moved, and how a player wins.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Rey Alicea
United States
New Jersey
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Quote:
However, if you're just thinking generally, and would like a discussion about board shapes that cancel out pinning opponent's pieces in corners, and you must limit the discussion to board shapes, then I would like to know more of the limitations placed on pieces, how they are moved, and how a player wins.


Hi Ted, yes I am speaking generally. Well this is the board I came up with after trail and error, it is an approximation of a super ellipse(super egg) using hex shapes. The rounded off corners of the board help but it's not perfect.

 


My current thought is to make a rounder super ellipse to add more spaces to the board extending play, that's why I asked about a circular board it seems to me like the right fit for the game.


The game is currently in the database Moai

Here are the rules...

Introduction

PushMePullYou is a territorial game for 2 players.

The game is played on a 100 cell hex board.

You will need 3 Black and 3 White pawns and a supply of counters.

Goal

Push or Pull your opponent's pawns until the last player able to place a counter and move his own pawns wins.

Play

Players start by each placing their pawns onto the marked hexes of the board.

White moves first.

Players take turns.

A player on his turn makes 2 moves. First place a counter on a space inline (orthogonally or diagonally) with you or your opponent’s pawn on the board. Once placed counters are fixed.

Next you push or pull you or your opponent’s pawn (orthogonally or diagonally) as far as you like (but a minimum of 1 space is required) along that path and as long as obstacles (counters, opponent’s pawn or the edge of the board) are not encountered.

Play continues until the player that is still able to place a counter and move his own pawns wins.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ted Spencer
United States
Lake in the Hills
Illinois
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Ok. If I understand the game correctly, players would want to trap opponent's pieces in corners because the object of the game is to have the last moveable piece.

So, maybe the problem isn't in the corners, but in the first move? In a game of perfect play, would White have an advantage? Other games (Hex comes to mind) deal with the first-player advantage. But I don't know how effectively.

Personally, I like the few pieces and the mechanics. I'm not sure about the size of the board, though. Seems large, but maybe my imagination's a bit small.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Rey Alicea
United States
New Jersey
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Quote:
This assumes the game rules have a pinning mechanism. One way to deal with this is to change the rules.


Thanks Ted your first sentence was the solution.

I went back to a standard 8x8 and I tweaked the rules that govern the pawns movement.

Now the pawns move orthogonally or orthogonally/1 space diagonally.

This now allows for the second player the ability to free himself from a tight spot, most of the time.

Now the game play is longer and more importantly players have to stop and think before they drop and move.

Thanks again

Note:

One interesting thing I noted was that if you play the game on the hex board your pawns are restricted to the horizontal rows and you can only move a single space up or down diagonally. Making playing the game quite different from the 8x8 Chess board.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ted Spencer
United States
Lake in the Hills
Illinois
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Sounds great. Good luck.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Rey Alicea
United States
New Jersey
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.