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Subject: Various questions rss

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David K
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When the Etruscans use their ability to bribe, does it automatically succeed? Can the opposing player refuse to accept the bribe?

If, for example, the Gauls are besieging an Etruscan city, can they be bribed to abandon the siege?

Is Roman card #14 a mistake? Why do the Romans have a card to enhance tha Carthaginians combat roll? If it is a mistake, what should replace it?

What's the deal with Acelum?
 
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Brad Johnson
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I'll jump in because I happened to see this before anyone else did, including Wray, apparently. Usually other more knowledgeable people beat me to it.

1) The Etruscan bribe power is automatic, but note it does require them to remove one of their 3ops cards from the game! So their ability to do it is far from unlimited, and quite costly.

2) Yes, the Etruscans could bribe the Gauls (or anyone else) to abandon a siege of one of their cities. Basically, they wheel out a big cart full of gold and say "Oh, is this what you were looking for? Take it and go." Apparently, this kind of thing happened historically. Wray could probably cite an actual example. Incorrect. See my other response below.

3) The Roman card to help the Carthaginians is essentially an anti-Greek event. (The Carthaginians normally only fight the Greeks.) Each of the different decks have a different mix of cards that can be used to screw specific other factions. Wray and I tried to balance those pretty carefully. And it makes sense for the Romans to have the pro-Carthage card because they have a stake in Carthage. In this time period, Rome actually allied with Carthage (reflected in a couple other events in the Roman deck.) [However, note this is for the base 4-player game. If you are playing the 5-player game where Carthage becomes a player power, then there is a replacement card for that event, plus a few others.]

4) Acelum represents a Gallic tribe that had pro-Roman leanings. (Again, Wray could probably tell you more about that.) So it's represented as a Roman-controlled tribal space. Rome can use this as a base for placing/extending support in the Gallic area. The Gauls are generally quite unhappy if/when they start doing this.

Hope you enjoy the game!
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Scott Randolph
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tempus42 wrote:

2) Yes, the Etruscans could bribe the Gauls (or anyone else) to abandon a siege of one of their cities. Basically, they wheel out a big cart full of gold and say "Oh, is this what you were looking for? Take it and go." Apparently, this kind of thing happened historically. Wray could probably cite an actual example.


One thing though, and I'm fairly certain I'm right here, when an opposing army is already in place with a "Siege 0" or higher marker on an Etruscan city, and it is the Etruscan player's turn, the bribe special ability may only be used to by-pass the opposing army without fighting a battle. Now, if the besieging army successfully intercepted the moving Etruscan force with all of its CU, thus leaving the besieged Etruscan city no longer under siege, then indeed the siege could in effect be lifted by the bribe ability, if the Etruscan player used the bribe ability in this case.

Otherwise, in the case where it is the turn of another player who attacks in order to besiege an Etruscan city, and the Etruscan force with a leader is already in place on the city in question, then a bribe could be used to prevent a siege from ever starting, but not really to "lift" it.

This is a fine point, but a rather important one, unless I am completely mistaken.
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Scott Randolph
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kade wrote:
When the Etruscans use their ability to bribe, does it automatically succeed? Can the opposing player refuse to accept the bribe?

If, for example, the Gauls are besieging an Etruscan city, can they be bribed to abandon the siege?

Is Roman card #14 a mistake? Why do the Romans have a card to enhance tha Carthaginians combat roll? If it is a mistake, what should replace it?

What's the deal with Acelum?


One more thing, this is an awesome game, play it a lot, especially the 5-player version.
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Brad Johnson
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Dang it, sorry about that. That'll teach me to actually read the rules before I comment.

Scott is correct - the bribe is played as a response in exactly 2 instances:

1) to force an army attacking an Etruscan army to back up and prevent the attack

or

2) to allow an Etruscan army to move through an opposing army without fighting.

So, you can't exactly lift a siege that is already underway with a bribe. (I swear we had this in an earlier version. It was probably removed for some important reason that I now forget.)

I edited my response above to avoid confusion...

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David K
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Thanks to both of you.

 
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Scott Randolph
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tempus42 wrote:
Dang it, sorry about that. That'll teach me to actually read the rules before I comment.

Scott is correct - the bribe is played as a response in exactly 2 instances:

1) to force an army attacking an Etruscan army to back up and prevent the attack

or

2) to allow an Etruscan army to move through an opposing army without fighting.

So, you can't exactly lift a siege that is already underway with a bribe. (I swear we had this in an earlier version. It was probably removed for some important reason that I now forget.)

I edited my response above to avoid confusion...



No worries at all...love this game...say "hi" to Wray for me.
(SFRR)
 
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