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Android: Netrunner» Forums » General

Subject: How much of a step up is Android: Netrunner from WH: Invasion? rss

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Mr. Money
Canada
Edmonton
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I believe that WH: Invasion is a jewel amongst my collection of card games. Its crowning glory is in its ease of play. I taught my young son how to play at 8 years old (with patience of course) but once we got into it, it was very intuitive. I just love how the resources build and attack flows. Sure, there can be a lot to keep track of on cards later in a match but it's not headache inducing.

Unfortunately, the theme doesn't resonate with my son (now ten years old) and he just doesn't ask to play it especially after a loss. Maybe later he might get into it but for now he's my only opponent as no one else in my area plays I know plays the game.

So now WH: Invasion is on pause mode for now (I refuse to trade it with the several exp. I purchased as I think it a fine enough to keep and someday I may get more play and actually do some deck-building).

So for those who have played both Netrunner and Invasion, how difficult is it to teach and play? I have read one review from an Invasion player and it said that there is more difficult to play but didn't go into much detail after that. Could I teach a 10 year old boy who can easily play Invasion and games like Quarriors? I also read that the game lexicon is something to get used to. For all these reasons, I hesitate to buy the game.

cheers
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Jeremy Owens
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I have not played Invasion myself.

I just wanted to quickly state that Netrunner does have a bit of a steep initial learning curve. Many people have been learning that skimming the rulebook leaves a lot of holes. Once all of the basic concepts are grasped, the game is relatively straightforward to play. However, the game is very skill based so you may be concerned with the quality of the matches (especially since there is a hidden information/bluffing aspect and I imagine it'll be pretty tough for a 10 year old to bluff his dad.)

I adore the game, but I don't know if it'll be the best to suit your current needs.
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Fire Lord
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My 11 yo son has no problem playing A:NR. I'm not sure he groks the strategy yet, but then again, neither do I
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Brad Miller
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The asymmetry makes netrunner very different, (as well as a higher level of bluff/deception which I find younger kids have trouble pulling off), but doable. My will-turn-7-in-a-month wants to play, but there is still a lot of reading involved and thought required that he may not be willing to put into it yet. We shall see.
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Mat Nowak
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My niece is 12 and she's a fellow playtester and beats me quite often (although she plays Corp only). I fall for her tricks all the time. (But then again she's a pretty brilliant child. Her favourite game when she was eight was RFTG of all things).
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Steve
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I've played both a few times. I wish I knew more people interested in W:I because I think it's fun and intuitive. I found Netrunner less intuitive, but not overly so. I'd say it's a small step up.

As others have mentioned, it is a very different game. W:I feels like a Magic descendant to me. Netrunner does not even though it was designed by the same guy. I'm liking the game a lot so far.
 
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Matt Deuber
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My 10 yr old boy and I have 3 games down so far. He prefers corp and is coming along nicely with the bluffing. It did not take him long to get up to speed with the lingo, and he even had to remind me several times to pay for the second server ice I installed.

So, yeah, age 10 is fine. Age 44 tends to forget rules, helpful to have a fresh young mind at the table.
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Agent J
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He's looking real sharp in his 1940's fedora. He's got nerves of steel, an iron will, and several other metal-themed attributes. His fur is water tight and he's always up for a fight.
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He's a semi-aquatic egg-laying mammal of action. He's a furry little flat-foot who'll never flinch from a fray. He's got more than just mad skills, he's got a beaver tail and a bill.
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Windopaene wrote:
The asymmetry makes netrunner very different, (as well as a higher level of bluff/deception which I find younger kids have trouble pulling off), but doable. My will-turn-7-in-a-month wants to play, but there is still a lot of reading involved and thought required that he may not be willing to put into it yet. We shall see.


I have a will-turn-7-in-a-month too! Let me know how it goes, 'cuz I know he's going to want to try!
 
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Peter Hall
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I think Invasion is easier to teach to people who have played Magic or Magic clones, but otherwise the games are of similar complexity. It might also be a bit easier to dive into Invasion with a less than comprehensive understanding of the rules. But, if a player has a reasonable grasp of Invasion rules like LIFO action resolution, the attack sequence, cost/resolution timing, etc., he or she shouldn't have real trouble with anything in NetRunner.

At the strategic level, there is perhaps a bit more to learn in NR, if only because there are two sides to learn. I think corp decks are a bit easier to build, but harder to play, so I would have your son play the runner with preconstructed decks until he gets the hang of it or wants to switch.
 
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