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Subject: Do Corps take silent Ps? rss

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Darrell Goodridge
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Haha. Made you look. But seriously, every time I see Corps as a game term I think of Marine [core] and Peace [core]. I'm pretty sure the Marines are not a corporation so it must be a different usage, so for me it begs the question, how do you pronounce Corp and Corps as it relates to Netrunner? Take the poll and help me out.

Poll
12. How do you pronounce Corp in Netrunner?
Core
Corp
13. How do you pronounce Corps in Netrunner?
Core
Cores
Corpse
      182 answers
Poll created by Cardboardjunkie
 
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Patrick Jamet
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Cor-po.
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Paul Clegg
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It's "Corp" (hard p) because it's an abbreviation of "corporation". It's not a shortening or variant of the word "corps" (eg. Marine corps, press corps") which is pronounced with a silent p (that word comes from an old French word). If you pronounced "corporation" without the p, then you'd have a case -- but you don't.

...Paul

BTW: The word "corps" (as in Marines) and the word "corpse" (as in dead body) DO actually derive from the same origin, "cors", which means "body". "Corporation" is taken from a Latin "corporare" which means "to embody", and likely both ultimately have very similar roots. However, when new words are taken, you derive them from the most recent source. So, corporation -> corp, you pronounce the p.

Steven Pinker had a really interesting book called "Words and Rules" that talks about how English evolved over time, and how the rules that govern the language evolved. One example that stuck with me was a baseball announcer that said someone had "flied out". Most people remember the past tense of "fly" is "flew" BUT in this case, the root was the phrase "pop fly", a noun, which he was then using as a "new" verb, and the modern rule for past tense is to apply -ed as a suffix, so the announcer was correct in saying "flied" in this case.
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Darrell Goodridge
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Thanks Paul. And to all the people that took the poll without posting. It's definitely a hard "p" in both cases according to the poll. The results were as definitive as my Mag-knee-toe vs Mag-net-oh question on another forum.
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Paul Clegg
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Now, "Mag-nee-to" vs. "mag-net-o" is a good question...

...Paul

 
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Darrell Goodridge
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According to popular consensus, it's definitely Mag-knee-toe. So the movies got it right.
 
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Phelan
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Was this popular consensus taken before or after the film? It's likely seeing it will influence the answer. Didn't scientists use the word before? How was it spoken then?
 
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Andy Mills
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All the online dictionaries I checked have mag-knee-toe.
 
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manydills wrote:
All the online dictionaries I checked have mag-knee-toe.


Too many body parts.
 
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Jason Novak
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Nice and smooth.
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Our sentence is up.
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I guess the real question we should be asking is this:

Poll
How do you pronounce NBN?
EN-bee-EN
en-BEE-en
Fox News
      19 answers
Poll created by jaynova
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Big Head Zach
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Doubleyew EEEEEEEEEEEEENNNNNNNNN bee cee!
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Jeremy Owens
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Fox News has the evil part down, but switch to letters.. NBN -> BNN... and shift one letter in the alphabet... BNN -> CNN. surprise

Either that or fake and irrelevant news grew to take over the industry. The remnants of The Daily Show and TMZ combined together to form NBN, ruled by a cybernetic Stephen Colbert.
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