Recommend
1 
 Thumb up
 Hide
32 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

Star Wars: X-Wing Miniatures Game» Forums » General

Subject: How is this different then wings of war rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
James Jones
United States
Tucson
Arizona
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I was just wondering if other then theam does this play or have different features from wings of war?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dan D
Romania
Bucharest
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
AFAIK, without actually owning the game:

- the pilots have a pretty big impact on moving and shooting (not simultaneous)
- the damage is rolled with dice, not counter pull
- there is some squad building aspect (You can pick worse/better pilots and upgrades for your ships)

That is it, off the top of my head.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Blorb Plorbst
United States
Bloomington
Indiana
flag msg tools
badge
I think we're all bozos on this bus.
Avatar
mbmbmb
imba19 wrote:
AFAIK, without actually owning the game:

- the pilots have a pretty big impact on moving and shooting (not simultaneous)
- the damage is rolled with dice, not counter pull
- there is some squad building aspect (You can pick worse/better pilots and upgrades for your ships)

That is it, off the top of my head.

Do the ships have unique maneuvers? or do they all pretty much fly the same?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris G
Canada
Kitchener
Ontario
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Well movement is similar. But you use dice to determine hit/miss. You have upgrades that can confer various special mechanics. Damage works differently. So while there are definite similarities there are differences as well. But ultimately a lot of the preference comes down to the Theme.

Mechanically I prefer Star Wars for it's differences. I like the additional options you can select to upgrade your pilots and I prefer the hit/damage mechanic.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Read the rulebook, plan for all contingencies, and…read the rulebook again.
United States
Austin
Texas
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm a Wings of War fan and initially had misgivings about X-Wing. I didn't need another WoW clone with Star Wars models.

After playing my first game a couple weeks ago, I can say this is not a WoW clone. And after mulling my experience over, decided that I'd jump into the ring, too.

It has some superficial similarities to WoW, but the rules and implementation are different. The point system for variable pilot abilities and ship upgrades alone put this outside of WoW. Pilot skill for Movement and Combat is also different from WoW. In this regard, it's much like Check Your Six—another air combat game I enjoy.

I don't want to oversell, but if you are a WoW fan, please play a game or two and judge for yourself. It's a lot of fun!
15 
 Thumb up
0.02
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Read the rulebook, plan for all contingencies, and…read the rulebook again.
United States
Austin
Texas
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
CrankyPants wrote:
imba19 wrote:
AFAIK, without actually owning the game:

- the pilots have a pretty big impact on moving and shooting (not simultaneous)
- the damage is rolled with dice, not counter pull
- there is some squad building aspect (You can pick worse/better pilots and upgrades for your ships)

That is it, off the top of my head.

Do the ships have unique maneuvers? or do they all pretty much fly the same?

All craft have different flight profiles. But all ships that can perform a "3 Hard Left", for example, share the same movement arc for that maneuver. Some maneuvers will put "stress" on one model that won't on others.

This is another facet of the game that is a bit analogous with Check Your Six.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ethan McKinney
United States
El Segundo
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
imba19 wrote:
- the pilots have a pretty big impact on moving and shooting (not simultaneous)

Maneuver selection is simultaneous, but execution is sequential.

Different ships have different maneuvers available, and different maneuvers cause (red) or remove (green) stress.

4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
O B
United States
Mountainview
California
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Many seemingly minor differences make for an evolution of this class of game that plays much faster and is much more tense than WoW.

Let's just say I love WWII combat even more than I love Star Wars, and I'm the position of thinking how to adapt this system to play with my WoW miniatures.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Take joy from your wins; take lessons from your losses.
United States
Davidsonville
Maryland
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb

CrankyPants wrote:

Do the ships have unique maneuvers?

    No. Not yet. They could, and I'm hoping the expansion packs bring more unique movement patterns with them. In the base set and the Tie/Y-Wing expansions the arcs used are the same, and the options on the wheel are pretty much the same. Some minor differences. For the moment the variability is in the combat capabilities.

    I've played a lot of Wings of War and Dawn of World War II and in the big-picture scheme of things the games are very similar. Implemented with different components, but very similar. When you get into the details, here's the primary differences in my opinion:

1. WoW/DoWWII -- moves are plotted 0-2 moves in advance. You have to deal with movement actions that you've already committed to. X-Wing that's not the case, each move occurs on the current turn.

2. X-Wing -- combat is more complicated, with lock-ons and evades and ways to mess with the other guy to get a handle on him. It moves a little slower but it's not tedious. There's a lot of counters on the table but you're likely only involved with a couple of them.

    Overall I think X-Wing is more in the "now" and WoW more in the "next". DoWWII is in the middle and if you play it by the complex rules it starts coming closer to X-Wing than WoW.

    I have WoW stuff and am not buying X-Wing because the two are similar enough in my opinion. But my buddy is buying X-Wing so that's a pretty easy decision for me to make.

             S.




4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Eric B.
United States
East Lansing
Michigan
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
MOVEMENT:
WoW: you plan two to three maneuvers ahead and are "locked-in" to earlier maneuvers. Physical movement slides along the small cards, resulting in less ground covered per maneuver than X-Wing.
X-Wing: you only plan one maneuver at a time and then move using templates (allowing for much further movement each turn than using the small cards for movement as in WoW). As a result, the actual battle space is less predictable and more dynamic in X-Wing.

Another difference here is that players can manage ships much more quickly in X-Wing and can control more ships than they can in WoW. Keeping the maneuver decks separated and organized and then rifling through the whole deck each turn to find the right card takes more time and table space than "spinning the wheel" in X-Wing. For me, this is a big improvement.

ACTION PHASE
:
WoW: as far as I remember (haven't played all instantiations of WoW), there is no corollary for this in WoW.
X-Wing: after moving, unless a ship is otherwise prevented (due to having to avoid a collision, certain damage effects, or having stress on the ship/pilot) each ship can perform an action from its craft's available list (e.g. Barrel Roll, Evade, Target Lock, Focus, Boost). This introduces a lot of meaningful decisions to the game each turn. The Action step is of crucial importance to performing well.

COMBAT
WoW: Dealt secretly by ships giving their target some number of face-down damage tokens that might vary from No Damage all the way through Instant Kill. Planes tend to have a lot of hit points.
X-Wing: Dealt by rolling Attack vs Defense dice depending on the type of attack and the range. Damage is dealt via cards, though these are dealt face-up only for Critical Hits and then apply an additional penalty to the Pilot or Ship. Fighters have between 3 and 8 hit points (measured in both Hull and Shield).

SQUAD BUILDING
WoW: Can't speak much to this, as I only played with friends who owned the game and would set up the battles.
X-Wing: Lots of decisions to be made in the pregame, as players spend the preset point limit on ships (each time choosing between a lower costed rookie pilot all the way up through expensive, highly skilled unique pilots with special abilities) and upgrades. Upgrades include things like additional weaponry, astromech droids, and elite pilot talents. So, for instance, a Y-Wing miniature may be an 18point generic Gold Squadron Pilot with a Pilot Skill of 2 all the way up to a 42 point Horton Salm unique with a Pilot Skill of 8, R2-D2, Ion Cannon, and 2x Proton Torpedo pay load. This adds a lot of depth to the game and players have a lot to think about between playing sessions as they muse through various builds and combinations.




[Whew, that ate up a lot of the lunch break. But hopefully we can just hyperlink to this thread whenever this inevitable question comes up in the future].
15 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Nico
Germany
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
The most obvious answer hasn't been given yet:

X-Wing is Star Wars!


WoW is not...
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mike Brown
United States
Ohio
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
One is based on real fighters, the other is made up fiction.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jonathan Franklin
United States
Seattle
Washington
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
Does anyone miss the altitude/z-axis aspect of dogfight sims?

Does it end up feeling like a naval game (2d) in space?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Take joy from your wins; take lessons from your losses.
United States
Davidsonville
Maryland
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb

    Yes.

             S.


 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Eric
Canada
Gatineau
Quebec
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Dorb wrote:
One is based on real fighters, the other is made up fiction.

Yeah, real fighters, like X-Wing, Tie-Fighters, Y-Wings and the like. Not those non-sense bi-planes and stuff... laugh
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Casteel
United States
Wylie
Texas
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Just to throw in my $0.02, as a huge Wings of War fan. I would consider this very much like Wings of War 2.0.

- Replacing the movement cards with cardboard templates was a nice upgrade for one.
- You build squads balanced by point totals instead of all planes being more or less balanced and just taking the same numbers of planes.
- Pilots, secondary weapons, pilot skills, droids, etc. as upgrades can really change the characteristics of a ship by a large degree.
- I find the ships move faster and the games are quicker, at least among my friends.

I'm sure there's more, but like I said, it feels like the natural evolution of Wings of War to me, taking it in a crunchier direction with more choice. I personally love it and to be blunt, it's a lot easier to get other people to play with Star Wars minis than WWI minis... or just the cards.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ben Boersma
Australia
Officer
Victoria
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Caveat before I start. I'm a huge Star Wars fan.

While I agree the movement templates are less fiddly than the cards, after a few games I think this game actually moves a lot slower and lacks the tension that can build in a game of Wings of War.

The use of the dice in X-Wing dictates the speed of the game too much and can really slow it down, especially with actions allowing you to add evades or focus to help evade, we found that it was quite swingy from planes getting taken out in one shot, to, despite lining up the same plane over and over again, them just constantly evading and never doing any real damage.

All the information in X-WIng is open knowledge and takes away from the tension that can build up with the facedown damage cards of Wings of War. I much prefer that system that where if you are in the firing arc, you cop a damage card. There is no slowing down of constantly evading or anything.

Having your plane's damage cards influence your moves on the table without your opponent directly knowing how much more damage you can take develops an excellent tension that I feel is totally absent from X-Wing and I think it is poorer for it.

While I think X-Wing is not a bad game, we were overall quite disappointed with the pacing and general feel and will get Wings of War to the table over it 90% of the time, despite our enthusiasm for Star Wars.

I know that's probably not a popular view, but I think I was burned by the hype a bit on this one and should have been more cautious. Perhaps a few more games will change my mind?
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Guido Gloor
Switzerland
Ostermundigen
Bern
flag msg tools
The statement below is false.
badge
The statement above is correct.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Boromir_and_Kermit wrote:
I know that's probably not a popular view, but I think I was burned by the hype a bit on this one and should have been more cautious. Perhaps a few more games will change my mind?
I don't think they will, if you got used to those things from WoW and now miss them in X-Wing. Personally, I wouldn't want any of them, but I can perfectly understand your view.

As for the dice versus damage cards, the main difference between them is that one is hidden and the other public - my understanding of the damage cards is that there are those that deal zero damage and those that take out the plane in one hit there, too, just like the dice can do it to spaceships in this game, so there doesn't seem to be a difference in the range or randomness of possible damage.

Just public versus hidden, and more possibilities for actually influencing how much damage you deal or get (with focus, evade, etc.) in X-Wing. Thus more strategy, too, unless I misunderstood something of those WoW rules that I now seem to know by heart even though I never actually read them or was interested in them at all.

To you, hidden damage is tension, to me, it's just annoying
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ben Boersma
Australia
Officer
Victoria
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I totally understand why open information is better for some people. It certainly helps if you play with people that either don't understand the game that well and I know it would be better for tournament style rules (less cheating possible).

Yes, some of the cards in Wings of War do 0 damage, but as the attacker you don't know that. The explosion card can be played as either instantly destroying the plane or taking off half its original hit points (I play this way).

With the cards, you still deal a card of damage (what that damage is is anyone's guess), but in X-Wing too often than not, all the damage will be voided by evading or focus. I found it frustrating rather than exciting rolling the dice in this game (and I come from a miniatures game background).

I really want to like it more, but it moved too slowly and lacked the tension. But I do understand that one person's tension is another's frustration and vice versa.

Perhaps its more in scenario play that the game will shine?

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Take joy from your wins; take lessons from your losses.
United States
Davidsonville
Maryland
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb

    Wings of War is much more about anticipating and trying to read your opponent, X-Wing is much more about reading the state of the game. It's less seat-of-the-pants than WoW.

    With the advanced rules WoW becomes as complicated as X-Wing though almost everyone I know plays it with the basic rules. That's largely (I think) because they want the focus to be on the movement instead of the complication. Both are fine, each provides a somewhat different play.

             S.


5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tony L
msg tools
mbmbmbmb
WoW vs X-Wing:
Movement:
First, I prefer the planning of 3 moves at a time. It rewards correct decisions and penalizes bad decisions. While moving via universally sized cards limits your distance/individual move, due to the faster combat resolution (check distance, give card, move on), you end up moving a bit further for each bit of "planned" movement.

For example, there are a lot of times where it is very obvious that nobody is in firing range of each other, so all 3 moves get played out by all planes, all at once, and all planes move a significant distance without having to pause for anything.

Additionally, while it has so far seemed to me that the "planning" stage of WoW takes longer than X-Wing's (per plane/ship), you end up getting more actions per time spent planning.

Meaning, you get 3 movements and up to 3 shots off, for X amount of time spent planning in WoW. In X-Wing, you get only 1 shot / planned time. I don't think there's any way that the planning phase of WoW takes 3 times as long as X-Wing's, so to me, there is more stuff happening at a faster pace.

I really liked the template idea for moving ships in X-Wing, however, I didn't like how the ships pretty much had the same set of movements, and they're all either straight or curves.

X-Wings and Y-Wings both have the equivalent to WoW's straight stall card, but TIE's did not.

The equivalent of Immelman's have no move requirements, and are executable at multiple ranges, and TIE fighters have better follow up options for them. So basically, there's no reason for the more maneuverable TIE fighters not to blast right past Rebel ships, Immelman, and be in better position than their opponents the following turn.

A big issue, though, is that there are no side-slip cards. So movement in X-Wing is *much* more predictable than in WoW. The ability to pull out unexpected, surprising, or really clutch moves in X-Wing is wildly more difficult than in WoW. Oh, and since Imperial ships are vastly more maneuverable than Rebel ships, most of the "nice move!" moments are going to be on the Imperial side.

So essentially, movement in WoW is more unpredictable, allows for great surprise piloting, and generally, combat can be more exciting and tension filled.

Movement in X-Wing is incredibly predictable. So far, not one movement phase has had anyone exclaiming "HOLY S**T WHAT A MOVE!" or anything similar, whereas we usually get that once per skirmish in WoW.

Combat:
As far as dice vs cards...I find it fairly equal, in terms of how fast you kill ships. However, one thing I will note, is that it is MUCH more frustrating to shoot a ship and *know* that you completely whiffed, than to shoot a ship, assign damage, and simply *suspect* that you did zero damage.

I mean, the end results are pretty similar. You can have planes/ships that just seem to tank a million shots, only to explode to what seems like a single blast later on. Or you have ships/planes that blow up the first time they're attacked (less possible in X-Wing when a TIE fighter attacks an X-Wing than vice versa, but its perfectly plausible for an X-Wing to die in a single combat phase).

I played some X-Wing last night, and my Luke completely dodged I think 9 incoming shots. I then died in the next 3 turns. So while it took 12 combat turns to kill me (it was actually only 2 physical turns, because 6 TIE fighters focused on me), the enemy fighters were much more frustrated while I was dodging. Whereas in WoW, the planes firing under the same scenario get to have the satisfaction of handing me damage cards, and I get to have the satisfaction of knowing they are 0's, without either of us getting mad.

Also, considering the number of *things* that happen per shot, combat resolution takes a significantly larger amount of time. When something fires at you, you have to consider the risks involved in using your defensive option. You have to take into account any defensive special abilities you may have. Your opponent and you have to both take into account your range bonuses, roll, and then adjust, and then see if you take damage.

Another thing I prefer in WoW is that special damage considerations tend to be in effect for much longer. Since individual planes tend to be tougher, and alive longer, getting your rudder jammed, or getting set on fire, or engine damage, or your guns jammed all can make for SERIOUS impact on your decision making.

In X-Wing, critical hits are pretty rare. On top of which, if they happen for an imperial shooter, and it hits a rebel shield, it doesn't do anything. And if you're through the rebel shields and assigning hull damage, chances are that ship is going to blow up a turn or two later. Often times, getting a critical hit and a regular hull damage in the same turn is the same as just being straight blown up.

Same goes for the Rebels firing on a TIE fighter. In last night's game, we had a total of 4 critical hits assigned, 2 rolled against TIE fighters (one blown up the following turn, one blown up at the same time as assigning the crit), 3 rolled against rebels. One was negated by a shield. One was the cause of a destroyed Y-Wing (mine - the crit was basically, rolling an attack die, if its successful, take 2 damage instead of just 1), and one was on an X-Wing that was blown up by the next thing to fire at it (it was a double damage card, so the next thing to hit it blew it up).

Overall Gameplay:
For me, Wings of War allows for an initial sortie, a scramble / re-planning, a second big sortie, and then a clean up. The individual actions feel faster and cleaner, and you're not really concerned with the damage. You're concerned with where your plane is going to end up, and how you're going to tail your opponents effectively.

X-Wing seems to be HEAVILY determined based on the initial sortie. Depending on luck, basically the entire scenario plays out based on who fares better in the opening salvos. So basically, initial sortie->clean up. Individual actions seem slower and more sluggish, but games in general take less time, as ships tend to blow up faster.

Additionally, I think that the point values on the cards are *wildly* imbalanced, but that's something I made a rather lengthy post about already.


Both games are fun.

Final Considerations:
X-Wing plays very, very differently based on which side you end up on. Rebel side (especially with the base rules) is very much the under dogs. Most people have had a lot of difficulty winning with the rebels, because you're out gunned and out maneuvered from turn 1. Rebels will have fewer ships, and will have to wait longer in between actions.

Imperials will have *lots* of ships, and get to plan more turns more often, and get the benefit of a hive/swarm-like force.

On our table, Rebels have won once. By the skin of their teeth. Imperials tend to win with 5-6 of their initial 8-9 fighters left.

In Wings of War, it is a *lot* easier to balance scenarios. Not just for equal numbers of players, but also for accounting for novices, experienced players, and differing team sizes.

You can easily have 1 player on a bombing mission control 3 bombers against a swarm of fighters, giving you a similar small fleet vs swarm feel. You can have equal planes vs equal planes. You can have older planes swarm against newer planes.

Overall, WoW has a lot more variety in terms of how flexible it is in adjusting to players, and it tends to scale *much* better with bigger numbers of planes.

However, the last thing to note is that for a new player, getting into Wings of War is going to cost you a *whole* lot more money. I've spent close to $300 equipping myself with the required decks, sheets, and minis. The main issue being that most of the best planes in the game are only available on Ebay, and often for $30-40 *each*. There aren't many options to get these planes outside of Ebay. Granted, for 300, I have 2 bombers, a balloon, 6 scouts, 12 fighters, and decks for everything. That can accommodate a MASSIVE 10 v 10 battle, and it would scale pretty damn well.

X-Wing, on the other hand, can be played for as little as $28 bucks from Amazon, and you can scale that based on how many points you want to be able to field. To be able to field ~100 point fleets, you'd have to spend about $135 (3 core sets, and 1 each of the X-Wing, Y-Wing, TIE fighter and TIE advanced expansions). That gives you 4 X-Wings, 1 Y-Wing, 7 TIE fighters and 1 TIE Advanced. This is enough for a 3v3, at best a 4v4.

So both games are expensive, but you can dip your toes into X-Wing for a much lower price than you can with WoW (unless you want to play WoW without the miniatures, in which case, I wouldn't bother. There's something much more visceral about playing with Minis that I just don't think translates to the card-only version).

Oh, and to be fair, if I really wanted to do a massive WoW campaign, if I used all of the plane cards I had available, and printed up additional maneuver decks, I could probably field 40 people on the table at once. You could have massive, massive, massive scenarios played out with WoW that way.
6 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Taylor
United States
Venice
CA
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
mazda74rx4 wrote:
I was just wondering if other then theam does this play or have different features from wings of war?

Nope. It's EXACTLY the same game.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Japheth Jones
United States
Nashville
Tennessee
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
haslo wrote:
As for the dice versus damage cards, the main difference between them is that one is hidden and the other public - my understanding of the damage cards is that there are those that deal zero damage and those that take out the plane in one hit there, too, just like the dice can do it to spaceships in this game, so there doesn't seem to be a difference in the range or randomness of possible damage.

One thing you are forgetting about cards vs. dice is that dice can always fail, over and over and over all night long. I must admit that I was a dice fan, but games like 40k and risk lost me and games like WoW/WoG won me. A card deck is not equally random like a die. That deck will ultimately deal X amount of damage, whereas dice can always fail or always 'crit.' To me, dice generally make luck a very heavy factor. For the extreme of this, watch a game of 'Risk' as a guy with 30 men attacks a defending man or two and loses his entire force, piece by piece.

Now, I am not commenting on the greater issue of other parts of the game, I am merely pointing out that there is a significant difference between the randomness of dice and of cards (You would have to reshuffle the deck after every draw to be that same as dice).
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Joshua Parva
United States
Illinois
flag msg tools
Omegalazarus wrote:
haslo wrote:
As for the dice versus damage cards, the main difference between them is that one is hidden and the other public - my understanding of the damage cards is that there are those that deal zero damage and those that take out the plane in one hit there, too, just like the dice can do it to spaceships in this game, so there doesn't seem to be a difference in the range or randomness of possible damage.

One thing you are forgetting about cards vs. dice is that dice can always fail, over and over and over all night long. I must admit that I was a dice fan, but games like 40k and risk lost me and games like WoW/WoG won me. A card deck is not equally random like a die. That deck will ultimately deal X amount of damage, whereas dice can always fail or always 'crit.'

Conversely, dice can also succeed over and over, and have a predictable distribution of odds. Whereas with a fixed deck, once Card X has been drawn, you can never draw Card X (and whatever effects it might have) again.

I do not know enough about the WoW combat system -- do all players draw from a common damage deck, or does each plane have its own unique deck?

My concern would be if you draw a "good" card early, you have lessened your chance to draw another good card, since it is a zero sum distribution and you've now removed a high magnitude result. Is that correct? Or do I misunderstand the system?

That could result in those odd situations that if I get lucky and hit 3 or 4 times in a row, I'm suddenly more likely to fire blanks for a while until I've missed enough to increase my success odds again... Does it create a rhythm of "string of successes followed by string of failures"?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Guido Gloor
Switzerland
Ostermundigen
Bern
flag msg tools
The statement below is false.
badge
The statement above is correct.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Omegalazarus wrote:
haslo wrote:
As for the dice versus damage cards, the main difference between them is that one is hidden and the other public - my understanding of the damage cards is that there are those that deal zero damage and those that take out the plane in one hit there, too, just like the dice can do it to spaceships in this game, so there doesn't seem to be a difference in the range or randomness of possible damage.

One thing you are forgetting about cards vs. dice is that dice can always fail, over and over and over all night long. I must admit that I was a dice fan, but games like 40k and risk lost me and games like WoW/WoG won me. A card deck is not equally random like a die. That deck will ultimately deal X amount of damage, whereas dice can always fail or always 'crit.' To me, dice generally make luck a very heavy factor. For the extreme of this, watch a game of 'Risk' as a guy with 30 men attacks a defending man or two and loses his entire force, piece by piece.
I agree with the Risk problem, but that's compounded by the combat system that forces both sides to use only a few pieces for each dice roll, and by the fact that even a good roll can fail if the opponent rolls better. Annoying indeed.

The damage distribution of cards is only fundamentally different form the damage distribution of dice if you go through the entire damage deck within one session. If you only use half the deck, it's easily possible that mostly either good or bad cards are the ones you'll actually see during a game.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   |