Sturv Tafvherd
United States
North Carolina
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Saving this top post to contain the latest info on the game

Oct 2, 2012 -- Introduction
Stormtower wrote:

At the core of this game are these design concepts:
1. cards are used to activate 1 or more units
2. a board of hexgrid as a battlefield
3. military units represented as DICE on the board
4. multiple DICE used in each hex to represent "hitpoints", damage eliminates DICE 1-to-1
5. custom dice are used: each die face showing 1 or more icons to represent attack, defense, movement, or special ability.
...
Here's what a very small skirmish would look like. Ignore the two lone cubes in the bottom left for now, we'll get back to that. The Red army (upper left) has two units facing off against the Blue army (lower right).

(credit to Goblin Slayer for the nice hexgrid.
...
Rolling the Dice
Let's look at those blue dice again

This is taken from the blue player's perspective, and I've moved the 3rd block out of the way of the 1st and 2nd block of each unit. You'll notice the light-blue "spiny" symbol at the center of the back face. That's the ID...

-- the 3-spine blocks are for the infantry-archer unit (2 stick arrows help you remember this, too);
-- the 4-spine blocks are for the light-infantry unit (hex + arrowhead ... move-and-attack)

That back face is one of the few faces that are hidden from the opponent. The bottom face of each block is also hidden; as well as the faces where the 1st and 2nd block touch each other. Technically, I could also use the front face of the 3rd block as a hidden face, since I place it behind the other 2 blocks; so far, I haven't needed to use it.

These hidden faces are (usually) where all the hard-hitting power of the unit will be. And when you roll the dice, you hope to reveal that power. If I roll the 3 infantry-archer dice, for example, I could hope to get all those back-faces to come up. It would reveal that it is an infantry-archer unit ... but I'd get a chance to deal a 6-power ranged attack.

Jump and Read the Introduction here


... or skip ahead to the walk-thru
Stormtower wrote:
...Here is Round 2
I'll let you figure out what went on.


...
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sturv Tafvherd
United States
North Carolina
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Saving this second spot to contain a historical list of links on the progress / development of the game.

Oct 2, 2012 -- Introduction
Oct 4, 2012 -- Short Walkthru
Oct 5, 2012 -- Design Notes: Dice

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sturv Tafvherd
United States
North Carolina
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Introduction

Some ideas were gleaned from this thread:
Query. Dice as blocks for hex wargame

At the core of this game are these design concepts:
1. cards are used to activate 1 or more units
2. a board of hexgrid as a battlefield
3. military units represented as DICE on the board
4. multiple DICE used in each hex to represent "hitpoints", damage eliminates DICE 1-to-1
5. custom dice are used: each die face showing 1 or more icons to represent attack, defense, movement, or special ability.

Items 1-4 all exist in several wargames, key examples being Commands & Colors: Ancients and Memoir '44

The key difference is the use of custom dice. And I hope that by using dice, I will manage to eliminate some of the minor frustrations about C&C games. I also hope to introduce new features that would otherwise be difficult to do in a C&C game.

Pictures help a lot ... so let's look at some.

Here's what a very small skirmish would look like. Ignore the two lone cubes in the bottom left for now, we'll get back to that. The Red army (upper left) has two units facing off against the Blue army (lower right).

(credit to Goblin Slayer for the nice hexgrid.

From afar, it's not so different from

Each unit stands in a hex, represented by 1 or more blocks (or cubes, in my case).


Now, here's where it gets interesting.


Hidden Deployment
One of the features I wanted to include is hidden deployment. Or at least ... semi-hidden. It would make sense that the enemy can tell your infantry and cavalry apart. However, from afar, it should be rather difficult to distinguish an infantry-archer unit from a light-infantry unit.

To figure this out, I had to stare at this picture.

If I'm the blue player, all I can see of the red player's block are the top, front, and the two sides adjacent to the front. The back and the bottom of the red block is not visible. And that means that I can hide some information about the unit by putting it on either the back or the bottom.

Of course, as the blue player, I'd still need to know what my units do. Since the back of my blue blocks face me, I can use put identifying information on the back. (Later on, I realize I also had to put the ID on the bottom ... more on that later).


Unit Abilities
One of the frustrations in C&C is the need for reference sheets or material; and in some cases, you pretty much had to leave the rulebook open. There's not a lot of information on those C&C blocks; although the pictures do give some nice immersive feel.

The nice thing about using dice is that you can "program them" to contain the information that you would need from a reference sheet.

C&C would say, "Roll x combat dice for unit A, but roll y combat dice for unit B." C&C would also say, "Count target symbols for unit A, but add in sword symbols for unit B." Having unit-specific dice lets you put those "skill tests" into the dice.

Here's a sample:


Hex-shaped dots indicate units of movement

Pentagon-shaped dots indicate units of defense (yeah, I know, it's not that clear from afar. I'm still working on the icons)

Arrowheads indicate melee-attack power

The dot-in-diamond indicates use of a special ability.

Stick-arrows indicate ranged-attack power.


Non-Revelatory Action
Before I get into rolling, I have to mention that I wanted to give the unit a way of taking an action without revealing itself. After all, once you roll those dice, there's a huge chance that it will land with hidden information visible to everyone.

Here's another look at those dice.


First take a look at the Red blocks. Can you tell them apart? All of the visible faces for those 3 dice are duplicated for every unit. That's primarily to preserve hidden deployment, and to provide a way of acting without revealing the identity of the unit.

The TOP face of the 3 blocks for each unit is exactly the same for all infantry types: two defense, one attack, one move (2 pentagons, 1 arrowhead, 1 hexagon). Thus, if the unit has not yet been rolled, it may take that Non-Revelatory Action (1 hex movement, power-1 melee attack). And, it also gets some good passive defense.


Command/Activation Cards
I still use cards to make activations. However, I'm also using cards to re-introduce initiative into the game. So, the cards will always have an initiative value; and some will have special maneuvers. The special maneuvers will be similar to C&C cards in that they would allow more than 1 unit to be activated, and/or provide some kind of bonus. Otherwise, each card can be used to activate any 1 single unit.

At the beginning of each "round", each player draws X cards (lets say 3 cards, for now). Players start counting up. "1 ... 2 ... 3 ... etc" If you have a card with a matching initiative value, you can stop the count-up and make your activation (which plays and discards the card).

(This is a pretty standard change I make to many games where there was an "I go, You go" cycle. The randomized initiative means that sometimes you can take 2 or more actions before your opponent ... but sometimes you don't.)


Rolling the Dice
Let's look at those blue dice again

This is taken from the blue player's perspective, and I've moved the 3rd block out of the way of the 1st and 2nd block of each unit. You'll notice the light-blue "spiny" symbol at the center of the back face. That's the ID...

-- the 3-spine blocks are for the infantry-archer unit (2 stick arrows help you remember this, too);
-- the 4-spine blocks are for the light-infantry unit (hex + arrowhead ... move-and-attack)

That back face is one of the few faces that are hidden from the opponent. The bottom face of each block is also hidden; as well as the faces where the 1st and 2nd block touch each other. Technically, I could also use the front face of the 3rd block as a hidden face, since I place it behind the other 2 blocks; so far, I haven't needed to use it.

These hidden faces are (usually) where all the hard-hitting power of the unit will be. And when you roll the dice, you hope to reveal that power. If I roll the 3 infantry-archer dice, for example, I could hope to get all those back-faces to come up. It would reveal that it is an infantry-archer unit ... but I'd get a chance to deal a 6-power ranged attack.


Back to work
That's all for now! I'm trying to get more of these prototypes crafted. I know it's a bit overkill for an initial stage of game design, since I can probably run through game mechanics with just regular pipped dice and a lookup table. But I wanted to test out the look and feel of the actual physical component that is playing such a huge role; cuz if it turns out that the physical component is not working out too well, I'll need to make major changes to the rest.

Feel free to give me any feedback, suggestions, or critiques!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Meaker VI
United States
Washington
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
This looks like and interesting system, though I have no specific mechanical comments right now. Any reason you arrange the units in groups of 3?
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sturv Tafvherd
United States
North Carolina
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Meaker VI wrote:
This looks like and interesting system, though I have no specific mechanical comments right now. Any reason you arrange the units in groups of 3?


edit to add this paragraph: i just realized that there might be a misunderstanding. Each unit in the pictures above is composed of 3 dice. So It is not that each cube represents a unit, and then I'm grouping them into groups of 3 cubes. Instead, each group of 3 cubes is 1 unit... and here is why... (end edit)

1 die easily proved far too random, with a very limited range of results. Plus, it was problematic to account for damage without adding a separate accounting system.

2 dice was a bit better, and I did play around with it using just lookup tables. The breaking factor was that it became really hard to squeeze all the icons onto just 2 dice. There might be opportunity later on to introduce a new type of unit that only uses 2 dice (artillery? cavalry?)

3 dice gave me more room to spread the icons around. Plus, it allowed me to play with "curvier" probability distributions. Which is somewhat nice, since it can give the player a better sense of expected or average values from the dice.

4 dice might have been an interesting step to take, considering I'll get to really refine those probability curves some more; and, it would look more like the 4-block infantry units in C&C (always nice to make the game look "familiar").

... however, I can already see issues with either production costs, and/or complaints about how long it takes to apply the stickers onto the cubes.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sturv Tafvherd
United States
North Carolina
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I thought I'd make a stab at writing out the rules ... but then decided to play around with the dice some more, LOL! And then I realized that going through the quick sessions I've been doing might actually help you guys understand the game flow better than a rough draft of rules.

So ... slideshow time! Grab some popcorn!

So here's a bird's eye view. It's a 3-on-3 skirmish. I do have "build points" assigned, so what you're seeing on the board is 24 points of units for each side; which is enough to get them 3 units. I'm focusing on light infantry and archers at the moment, so those are the two types you'll see here. Each side also gets 2 command cards. Right now, the cards don't do anything interesting aside from setting initiative: a low value card acts before higher value ones, and in ties, diamonds act before hearts.

Some important information to keep in mind ...

For all the units, when you get the ID symbol as a die result, you can replace it with a move icon or a close-combat attack icon.

Light infantry's special ability is to hit-and-run: they may split a part of their movement to be taken after they perform an attack.

Archer's special ability is to overarching fire: they may ignore line-of-sight obstructions and hit a target that is 4 hexes away. (Regular ranged combat only hits 2 hexes away, and may be blocked by other units that are in the line-of-sight.)


Each side gets 2 cards. And those are closeups of the back sides of their units.

Blue plans to use his two light infantry to protect his single archer unit.

Red plans to use his two archer units to rain death on anyone who dares to get close.

Action 1


Blue goes first. He activates and rolls his rightmost light infantry. He gets 3 movement (2 movement icons + 1 ID), which isn't enough for him to get close and his 3 ranged attacks. But he moves out to the side, hoping to bait someone to get closer ... and get into his archer's long range bows.


Action 2

Red tries to respond with his leftmost archer unit, but they failed miserably. They neither moved far enough, nor did they get a Special Ability icon to get in range. And even if they did, the target infantry had 3 block/defense symbols, making it very tough to do damage.

Action 3

Red goes again, and this time, his light infantry move in to intercept. Movement 3 (2 move icons + 1 ID), followed by 4 Attack (3 close combat icons + 1 ID). And that's enough to deal 1 damage to the blue light infantry.

Blue discards one of his 3 dice for that light infantry. (note, each of the 3 dice is different from the other 2 ... so he has a decision to make: he selects the die that would typically give him movement icons)

Action 4

Blue takes his 2nd action, and has an easy long-range target for his archers. He activates and rolls his archer unit, manages to move the unit up closer, and lands 4 ranged attacks. The targeted red light infantry did not have any defense icons showing, so it is eliminated! (3 damage would have been enough)

Get the gist of it?

Here is Round 2
I'll let you figure out what went on.







(ugh,flubbed again)

(well, he tried to catch up)

(yay, we finally got rid of that blue guy)

(this archer unit is about to make his 2nd kill)

At the end of round 2, blue has 2 units remaining, and red only has 1 left.


2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Meaker VI
United States
Washington
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Ah, 3-dice are a single unit. That makes some more sense. So, if I'm understanding correctly, each unit is made up of 3 dice, one attack, one defense, and one move; and all with the unit's special icon?

It's also unclear to me what the cards are doing, they are helping move somehow, but are they the number of dice rolled or units moved or a bid system or...?

I like the elegance of the damage system, and the variability of the dice-unit. It seems to me that, if you can make your own units, allowing "generic" dice that are always better than the unit-dice, but not better than the unit dice special abilities.

Other than hiding the special ability initially, I'm not sure I see how stealth works - you have to roll to do anything. Unless the initial arrangement is free to use, and you only need to roll to do something different.

I do not like your icons, they're too similar and difficult to identify. You've identified that issue already, but maybe try using shield-outline-shapes for defense, filled triangles for movement, sword-outlines for attack, a bow for archers, and a shield over a sword for infantry. And make the unit identifiers much larger.
2 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sturv Tafvherd
United States
North Carolina
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for the feedback! It is much appreciated!

Meaker VI wrote:
Ah, 3-dice are a single unit. That makes some more sense. So, if I'm understanding correctly, each unit is made up of 3 dice, one attack, one defense, and one move; and all with the unit's special icon?


That's 99% correct. I'll go into more detail later (about 8 hours from now). I plan to talk about how I went about designing how the dice icons were spread out.

Meaker VI wrote:

It's also unclear to me what the cards are doing, they are helping move somehow, but are they the number of dice rolled or units moved or a bid system or...?


The cards (as they are used in the walkthru above) are a way of telling "which player goes first... and who goes next". That's what I meant when I was talking about "initiative value".

So, going back to the walkthru, blue had 2 and 8 for the first round, and red had 2 and 3. Blue's 2 was a diamond, so it is considered "lower" than Red's 2 of hearts (this part will be clearer when I make my own cards, which are likely to be numbered 1 to 20). So, the order in which the players took their turns during round 1 was dictated by the "initiative value" on the cards:

Blue's 2
Red's 2
Red's 3
Blue's 8


Meaker VI wrote:

I like the elegance of the damage system, and the variability of the dice-unit. It seems to me that, if you can make your own units, allowing "generic" dice that are always better than the unit-dice, but not better than the unit dice special abilities.


Again, you'll see more when I elaborate on how the values on the dice are allocated. But yeah, I think you understand how it works.

Meaker VI wrote:

Other than hiding the special ability initially, I'm not sure I see how stealth works - you have to roll to do anything. Unless the initial arrangement is free to use, and you only need to roll to do something different.


Yes, you got it. The initial arrangement is the "Non-Revelatory Action" I was talking about in the introduction. I didn't get a chance to demonstrate it in the walkthru, unfortunately.

Meaker VI wrote:

I do not like your icons, they're too similar and difficult to identify.... And make the unit identifiers much larger.


Yup, still working on that; but I can't make any changes to the current prototype. So I'm gonna be stuck with what I have for at least the next 1 or 2 months. I would really like to use pictures; but right now, those are mostly wingding symbols. They're good enough for my solo playtesting; and I will have better stuff before I go for external playtesters.


1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Meaker VI
United States
Washington
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Excellent, all is clear now.

Might I suggest using The Noun Project for your icons? I found good ones for shield (defense), archer (special unit power), sword (melee attack), and spear (might be good for regular infantry). Move was a bunch of arrows, but you could use dots for that. Ranged attack might remain arrows. Splash damage would look good as the move icon if you ever implement that. Axe, fire, and running might also be useful, along with all the regular card suits. You don't need the images to be very complex, and having too complex of images would definitely hurt you since they wouldn't be as easily readable from a distance.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sturv Tafvherd
United States
North Carolina
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Anatomy of the Die Faces
(or ... "Wassup wid usin' 3 dice?")

Hidden Deployment
First, I want to reiterate a point I made in the Introduction. I wanted the game to feature hidden deployment. When the game starts, it should be difficult to distinguish an infantry-archer unit from a light-infantry unit. This meant that every unit would start the game in a "non-revealed" state.

Non-Revelatory Action
Secondly, I also wanted to give the unit a way of taking an action without revealing itself. That led to the idea that the "non-revealed" state should make all the units look the same from the opponent's point of view ... and that the only things that the unit can perform as a non-revelatory action would be actions that _every_ unit can do.

And that led to this ...

This is a view of the top and front sides of the dice. There are two units pictured here, and as you can see, they both have the same exact set of icons on the top and front sides. When initially deployed onto the battlefield, the center die of each group-of-3 will actually be positioned directly behind the other two (as you've already seen in the Short Walkthru).

Since the top face of the die would be visible to both the player controlling the unit and the opponent, I decided to make that the key "reminder" of what the Non-Revelatory Action would be.

Thus, if the unit has not yet been rolled, it may take that Non-Revelatory Action (1 hex movement, power-1 melee attack). And, it also gets some good passive defense (2 defense).


Unit Type Differentiation
Okay, so fine ... we can hide the identity of the unit from the opponent during initial deployment. But now you're asking ... "How do we tell our own units apart?"

From our perspective, we'd be looking at the back of the dice, like so:

Well, actually, I flipped it over so you can see both the bottom side and the back face (which is now on top). But in the center of both of those faces, you'll find a symbol (in this case, it is in red). That's the identity (or ID) symbol.

The 3 dice on the left group are archers, as indicated by the 3-spiney symbol. The 3 dice on the right group are light infantry, as indicated by the 4-spiney symbol.

It actually became important that I put that ID symbol on both back and bottom, since it guarantees that at least one of those sides will be visible (on the side, not necessarily on top) when you roll the dice. As it turns out, having an ID symbol on two sides of all 3 dice also results in an average result of getting 1 ID symbol in a roll... which is a handy thing to know as I considered the rest of the average results.


Examining Average Performance
In terms of icons, I knew only 2 things so far:
-- what to put on the top face of each die
-- the back and bottom faces need to have the ID symbol

I also knew that certain "outer" sides would be exposed/visible to the opponent, and so the icons on those sides would have to be the same for all of the units.

So, I started up a spreadsheet workbook, so I can keep track of the die/face combinations, and keep an eye on the average. Below, you'll see the entries for the archer and light infantry units.


The die faces that would be visible are highlighted in yellow; and as I explained, those will match up on corresponding dice for each unit.

Another design decision I made here was in giving each die a kind of "specialty". The left die provides most (but not all) of the defense icons. The right die provides most (but not all) of the movement icons. The center die has a lot of the attack (melee and ranged) icons, but the right die comes in at a close second.

Now it's just an iterative process of having several of these spreadsheets (one for each unit), and playing with the icons, and making sure that each unit will shine for the purposes intended for it.

In this case, I've shown what I currently have with the archer and light infantry; but, I actually have 4 other sheets for medium and heavy infantry, a leader/command unit, and a decoy/fodder unit. I worked on all 6 at the same time, looking at average performance to make sure each unit would perform as expected in relative terms to the other units.

For example, I wanted the light infantry to be a highly mobile unit, so it has the highest average movement (2.0). The archers, on the other hand, are not very mobile at all (average at 0.8). However, the archers have terrific ranged ability (2.5).

Variability of Performance
I also have another sheet that generates all the permutations of rolling the 3 dice, and computes the distribution histogram. That way, I can see what the high and low values are, and the probability that each of the range of values would occur.

For example, our archer's ranged attack has the following distribution currently:

0 hits: 12.5%
1 hits: 12.5%
2 hits: 29.2%
3 hits: 17.1%
4 hits: 19.4%
5 hits: _5.6%
6 hits: _3.7%

And using a tool like that would let me try out different configurations. Let's say I "moved" one of the ranged attack icons from the left die to the center die (turning the left's back "2-r" to "1-r"; and making the center's back "2-r" to a "3-r")

That still gives me a 2.5 average, but the distribution is considerably changed. (And this might be one change I make for the next version)

0 hits: 12.5%
1 hits: 16.7%
2 hits: 23.6%
3 hits: 20.4%
4 hits: 14.4%
5 hits: _8.3%
6 hits: _3.2%
7 hits: _0.9%


Damage Reduces Performance
Undefended/unblocked hits cause damage to be suffered by the unit. And for this game, each damage means removing one of the dice. As a natural consequence, the performance of the unit will be affected ... most of the time. There are some cases where a die has no contribution of a particular icon ... for example, for both the archers and light infantry, the center die does not provide any defense icons.

I am well aware that other games -- particularly C&C -- do not have this feature. However, I wanted damage to reduce the unit's performance because I believe that to be the case, especially considering that I'm considering an Ancient Warfare theme for this game.


Alrighty ... that's it for now. I've got a lot of personal playtesting to do, and a rulebook to compose. So you might not see me update this for a few days.... but still, feel free to comment.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Meaker VI
United States
Washington
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Excellent! This last post clears everything up perfectly, well done; this looks like a pretty creative and elegant system you've come up with. I love how damage is to the actual components that make up and give power to a unit, and how you *could* keep everything hidden if you wanted to.

Slightly concerned about rolling - if you roll you're basically guaranteed to have everyone know what your unit is, even if no unit symbols come up on the result, because of the nature of rolling. Unless you roll privately and then arrange the unit how you please, which introduces a greater opportunity for cheating. It's not too big a deal though since you're already hoping to reveal your unit if you roll it.

Great job, love the system, might need "borrow" portions of it in the future.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sturv Tafvherd
United States
North Carolina
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Meaker VI wrote:
Excellent! This last post clears everything up perfectly, well done; this looks like a pretty creative and elegant system you've come up with. I love how damage is to the actual components that make up and give power to a unit, and how you *could* keep everything hidden if you wanted to.

Slightly concerned about rolling - if you roll you're basically guaranteed to have everyone know what your unit is, even if no unit symbols come up on the result, because of the nature of rolling. Unless you roll privately and then arrange the unit how you please, which introduces a greater opportunity for cheating. It's not too big a deal though since you're already hoping to reveal your unit if you roll it.

Great job, love the system, might need "borrow" portions of it in the future.


Feel free to use the system, I don't even know if it's completely new and unique. My earlier thread (mentioned in the intro) was my attempt to find where others have trod before.

I will probably have a rule that says "all dice rolling is to be done in public". The intention is that the only way a unit remains stealthed is by using non-reveal actions and by staying undamaged.

And yes, for the most part, once the units engage in combat, their identity is revealed. It doesn't take that long. Still, the initial "fog of war" makes for interesting opening maneuvers. An also allows for non-combat victory conditions... like capture-the-president, or rescue the prisoner.


(edited to finish the last paragraph)
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Alex Sen
msg tools
Hey cool, kinda looks like the idea I had to use dice as resources and as objects. I was sick of the same old boring way how games used dice and have been developing this idea to use dice in more innovative ways, almost like cards and as markers and tokens. I have two games right now which I am developing using similar ideas - Dicebatsu and Kami Kung Fu Spirits Dice Battle! (a shameless plug! (^o^) )
Actually I got a whole bunch more ideas of which I want to develop, but as I only have so much time in a day, well...
Dicebatsu and Kami Kung-Fu Spirits Dice Battle are games which use dice as resources, tokens and random generators. Check them out, if you like games with dice!
An extension I was working on to my Kami Dice Battle(!) Game is an expansion in which you could use the Kami Dice Battles mechanism and play like it with a strategic chess board, which is very similar to your idea here.
Ninja'd~! (T_T).oO(Why me???)

If you want to discuss ideas or follow my work you can check out my threads or send me a email.

http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/852114/kami-spirits-dice-bat...

http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/835064/dicebatsu-wip-a-strat...
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.