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Subject: Recommend a battle in WW2 European theater on a batallion/regiment level? rss

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Joe Kundlak
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Folks,

I am searching for a well-documented (e.g. for instance having easily accessible TOEs for both sides) battle on a batallion/regiment level in the European theater during WW2 - the unit scale might be even higher, but encompassing batallion/regiment details if possible.

My prerequisite would be that it is predominantly infantry-based, though armor can have a role there. Also, if it has some interesting - e.g. varied - terrain, it would be nice.

It does not matter where or when during the war this is, the most important thing is enough information - please recommend even the most used and "washed-out" battles you know, so that I can search for them on teh internets.

I want to try some small exercise for myself, so that I can test some theories I have in my head for some months now

Thx!
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K G
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Operation: Market-Garden. Game: "Highway to the Reich." (We're not insisting on straight-leg infantry, are we?)
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K G
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Smaller battles might serve you best, such as something about Dieppe or involved with the Battle of Cassino. I think nearly any battle in North Africa has many resources available. Maybe look for the SPI North African quad games? (http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/11054/four-battles-in-nor...)

EDIT: Strike North Africa. I forgot you wanted to focus on infantry!
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Steve Arthur
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The 1944 Ardennes Offensive has been extensively researched...characterised by lots of infantry actions as well as armour...all kinds of terrain involved both natural and man-made
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Michael Dorosh
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Atraxrobustus wrote:
The 1944 Ardennes Offensive has been extensively researched...characterised by lots of infantry actions as well as armour...all kinds of terrain involved both natural and man-made


And he was asking you to name one, either battalon sized or regimental sized, preferably infantry-heavy, and well-documented.

Got one in mind?
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Bradley Fletcher
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Got to say that GMT's new Red Winter is a terrific and playable take on a battle from the Winter War. Brilliant design. But GMT's Ardennes '44 and Normandy '44 are also fabulous games.
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K G
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Michael Dorosh wrote:
Atraxrobustus wrote:
The 1944 Ardennes Offensive has been extensively researched...characterised by lots of infantry actions as well as armour...all kinds of terrain involved both natural and man-made


And he was asking you to name one, either battalon sized or regimental sized, preferably infantry-heavy, and well-documented.

Got one in mind?
These might be ideal: http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/7092/battles-for-the-arde...

There's even a campaign game that links the four games, if my memory still works adequately.
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Steve Arthur
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Some interesting actions mentioned here...


http://munseys.com/diskone/bastogne.pdf
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Martin McCleary
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Any of the actions around Caen in July 44 (particularly Hill 218) will meet your criteria. There are numerous games on the Caen area topic the most recent on the scale you mention is "Bloody Hell" by High Flying Dice.

There is also Chris Hardings recent Road to St Die which again is on the scale you want and is documented.

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Peter Hutchinson
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How about the American campaign in the Hurtgen Forest? Challenging terrain, infantry battle.
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Operation Hubertus, or any number of Stalingrad engagements.
As far as Stalingrad is concerned, take your average 1942 battalion or regiment strength from either side, reduce that strength by about 80-90 percent and, voila, instant OOB. whistle

Actually, I've never tried to research these kind of things.
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Joe Kundlak
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All good suggestions so far!

Keep 'em comin'!
 
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Michael Dorosh
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Steven C. Swann provided the following research data for the "Monkeys with Typewriters" ASL scenario design contest, any use of this info should be credited to him. The info provided the groundwork for something like 10 or so ASL scenarios which were then judged by a panel of experienced players and designers. The idea came about after a forum discussion about what would happen if a bunch of designers were given the same source material to work from. The results were quite interesting. You can read about the scenarios here and download them here

THE BATTLE FOR OESTFOLD

--------------------------------
Oestfold is the southeast part of Norway. In this text it will refer to the area from Oslofjord to the Swedish border, south of a line from Oslo to Kongsvinger. This battle is seldom mentioned other than in passing, as it was a short action, and there were no British troops nearby.



The Geography
-------------
To be able to describe the events for people without good maps, I will have to take some time describing the geography of the area. Oestfolds western border is the deep Oslofjord. At its most narrow part the old Oscarsborg coastal fortress is situated. Further south lies the town Moss, with a small port, and at the mounth of the fjord lies the more modern "Oslofjord" coastal fortress.

From the mounth of the Oslofjord there is a short, rather broken, coastline to the Swedish border. Here lies the cities Fredrikstad and Halden, and a few miles inland from Fredrikstad lies Sarpsborg. Fredrikstad is the most important city in Oestfold. To the east Oestfold borders to Sweden.

Reference #1

Oestfold is divided in two approximately equal pieces by the big river Glaama, running from north to south with its mounth in Fredrikstad. It makes for a rather formidable riverline with two long lakes covering about half its length, and from the southernmost lake the river forks in two and sometimes three branches past Sarpsborg and down to Fredrikstad.

The part of Oestfold west of river Glaama is the denser populated region, with mixed terrain and a reasonably dense roadnet. East of the river most of the terrain is covered with dense forests, with few roads. Exceptions are a strip along the river and an area between the two long lakes where the river makes a bend to the west (approx. 20km long). At the area east of the river bend the terrain is quite open. There the small towns Askim and Mysen are situated. At the eastern end of this open area there is a fortress, "Fossumstroeket", built to defend the rivercrossings at the river bend against attacks from the east.

The Planned Defence of Oestfold
-------------------------------
The first division under Gen. Erichsen was responsible for the defence of Oestfold (district commander). Two scenarios were contemplated when planning the defence; invasion over land through Sweden, or invasion over the sea. A land invasion was supposed to be stopped at the Glaama
river line, with the two most important crossings, at Sarpsborg and at Askim, was covered by forts.

An invasion over the sea was supposed to be stopped at the mounth of the Oslofjord by the Oslofjord coastal fortress. Thus the army units were supposed to defend the coast between the mounth of the fjord and the Swedish border. For this two local defence, and two field batallions, a bicycle squadron (company) and a light art. platoon (2x57mm guns) were scheduled. One local defence batallion, the artillery platoon and the bicycle squadron in the Fredrikstad area, one
local defence batallion near Halden, while the field batallions should be stationed near Sarpsborg. A field brigade could be positioned further north. Much emphasis was placed on the destruction of bridges in case of an invasion. Therefore each bridge had a civile "bridge commisar" and a "bridge guard", that in case of mobilization would
gather at the bridge and prepare its destruction. Explosives and detonators were stored near the bridges.

The main defence installations within the area were:
- 1. Div HQ in Fredrikstad
- Infantry reg.1 (I.R.1) in Fredrikstad
- Artillery reg.1 (A.R.1) in Ski
- Fossumstroekets festning - land fortress with two forts near Mysen, and also depot for the heavy motorised artillery belonging to the army HQ.
- Sarpsborgs festning - deactivated land fortress with two forts near Sarpsborg
- Oscarsborg festning - Coastal fortress near Droebak in the inner part of Oslofjord.
- Rauoey coastal battery - A battery with 15 cm guns on the island of Rauoey, in the outer part of Oslofjord (there were more batteries on the western side of the fjord).

On the morning of the 9:th of April 1940 the following military units was situated in the area:
- II/A.R.1 in Fredrikstad (8x75mm field guns and 8x120mm howitzers. All horse drawn)
- 1. Div HQ in Fredrikstad
- 2. Div school (parts) in Fredrikstad (weak company)
- 1. Div school in Halden (company strength)
- Marine guard unit in Fredrikstad, guarding a destroyer under construction (platoon size).
- A guard platoon at Hoeytorps fort
- Two artillery school platoons at Hoeytorps fort
- A small guard detachment (26 men) at Sarpsborgs fortress
Norwegian installations and mobilization
----------------------------------------
At 04:00 the HQ of 1.Div in Fredrikstad got a message from Oslo that a mobilization order was in process and was to follow within a couple of hours (a lot of paper work to be done I guess).

The commander of 1.Div, Gen. Erichsen, immediately began the process of a full mobilization, and when the order came and turned out to be a partial mobilization with the 11:th April as first day of mobilization, he decided that it was too late to change his previous order.
A.R.1:
A.R.1, had their depots in Ski. Officers and some men turned up on 9th April and began organizing the stuff. During the day reports came, first of German landings at Moss, south of Ski, then of a German column moving north from Moss toward Ski. As no organized units was available to defend Ski, the depots was hastily evacuated over Glaama to the Askim area, with as much equipment as possible. Here the transport company (Bilkp.7) of the area was essential. They managed to mobilize and then help with the evacuation of depots already on the 9th. The
only artillery saved was however two 75mm guns. The men and weapons saved from the depots was organized into the Askim detachment. It turned out that the German column wasn't heading for Ski, but passed by in great haste on their way to Oslo. The depots in Ski wasn't occupied
until the 11:th April, and the Norwegians could continue to secure more equipment in small "raids" to the depots.

I.R.1:
I.R.1 had their depots in Fredriksstad, Here mobilization began on the 9th. As the position was regarded as too exposed to German advances the depots and men were however evacuated to the area around Fossumstroekets fortress (near Mysen). There the organization of I and II/I.R.1 as well as the local defence battalion of I.R.1 was finished by the 12:th of April and that day the organization of an improvised III/I.R.1 began.

Fossumstroekets fortress:
Fossumströkets fortress had two rather strong forts, Hoeytorp and Troegstad, each with two 12 cm guns and two 7.5 cm guns in turrets, as well as eight old 8.4 cm guns in pits. In addition Hoeytorp fort had four 12 cm howitzers. The fortress was still on active status, but in latter years the main emphasis had turned from the fix installations, that was regarded as obsolet, to the organization of two modern motorized artillery batallions. One batallion of eight 12 cm
howitzers and one batallion of twelve 10,5 cm guns. In addition there were small arms for about three batallions stored at the fortress. The result was a mess! The invasion caught the fortress in a process of shuffeling around the ammunition in the fortress to make room for the new guns and their ammunition. The result was that only a few hundered shells could be found for the 12 cm turret guns and no ammunition whatsoever for the 12 cm motorized guns. Moreover only two of
the twelve 10,5 cm guns could be used as they were the only ones with rubber for the tires (it is not entirely clear why the rest couldn't be used on a provisorical basis, without the rubber). Apart
from the general confusion there were also a shortage of trained personell, as many of the men in the organization lived in areas occupied or cut off by the Germans (a common problem for the
Norwegians).

Sarpsborgs fortress:
Sarpsborgs fortress had two forts dominating the Glaama river around Sarpsborg, Greaaker fort with two12 cm guns in turrets, west of the city, half way to Fredrikstad, and Ravnebergets battery with two 10.5 cm and four 7.5 cm guns, northeast of the city. The fortress had reserve
status, which meant that no men, except for a small guard unit, were assigned to it in case of mobilization and that all material and installations was prepared for long time storage. A number
of men gathered at Greaaker fort, and together with the guard unit there were about 90 men defending the fort. They were unable to prepare the guns though, as they were partly dismantled and prepared with some thick grease, that they didn't manage to remove. They requested a
weapon technican from Fossumstroeket but didn't get any. Ravnebergets battery was guarded by ten men. Unlike in Greaaker they were able to prepare the guns, but they didn't have the men to man them.

Norwegian movements before the 12th of April

--------------------------------------------
Gen. Erichsen (the district commander) decided on the 9th to concentrate his forces around Mysen, protected from the Germans by the Glaama river line, and supported by the Fossumstroeket fortress. Next question was wether to defend the position or go north to unite
with the 2.Div north of Oslo. The communication was broken, but finally they managed to get in contact with the overcommand by connecting through Sweden. Over the very noisy connection they got an order to defend their position. The already mobilized II/A.R.1 was already on the 8th April ordered to take a dispersed formation, ready for march. On the 9th they were ordered to march to Mysen, using night marches, and to take cover during the days (to avoid air attacks). They arrived at Mysen on the 11th and were ordered to Askim, to support the Askim detachment (see above), defending the river crossings.
I and II/I.R.1 began their mobilization in Fredrikstad, but were ordered north to Mysen to finish their mobilization. When they arrived there I/I.R.1 were immediately ordered to march up to the Fetsund bridge over Glaama (north of lake Oeyeren and east of Oslo), to protect the north flank.

The battalion commander did however claim that the troops were too exhausted after mobilization and march to be able to do that, and the order was recalled. That was unfortunate as they would have arrived before the Germans took the bridge. Instead two weak patrols (10
men each) was sent to guard the two roads leading south from Fetsund (one on the east side of Oeyeren and the other through the forests further east (through Aursmoen). Especially the eastern road was also extensively blocked with trees over the road.

German movements up to the 12th of April
----------------------------------------
When the first and second follow up waves had reached Oslo, in the morning of the 11:th of April, Falkenhorst felt secure enough in Oslo to begin offensive actions. Now the main fighting formations of the 163:rd and 196:th infantry divisions had arrived. The 181:st div should arrive within a couple of days. In the original plans I.D.163 and I.D.196 should immediately press forward toward Bergen and Trondheim, while Oestfold should be left isolated, for I.D.181 to take care of later. Stronger than expected resistance north of Oslo and high losses for I.D.163 and I.D.196 during the sea transport as well as reports of big Norwegian troop concentrations building up in the Askim-
Mysen area southeast of Oslo did convince Falkenhorst that it was neccessary to delay the northen thrust and eliminate the Norwegian troops in Oestfold first. The task was given to I.R.362, reinforced by I/A.R.233 and a platoon from bicycle squadron 233. All from I.D.196.
On the 11:th of April three columns left Oslo. They will be called the north, middle and south column.

South column (improvised motorization):
I/I.R.362.
2 batteries/I/A.R.233.
1 platoon/bicycle squadron 233.
Middle column (improvised motorization):
II/I.R.362.
reinforced company of I.R.324.
North column (by foot and horse):
III/I.R.362.
1 battery/I/A.R.233.
1 platoon/bicycle squadron 233.

The south column followed the main road toward Fredrikstad, with the mission to clear the Fredrikstad-Sarpsborg-Halden area from Norwegian troops. The middle column had the mission to cross river Glaama at Askim and destroy the troops mobilizing at Fossumstroekets fortress. They moved south with the south column, and then turned east on the main road to Askim and Mysen, that crosses river Glaama on the Fossum
bridge near Askim. The north column marched east from Oslo and down on the west side of lake Oeyeren and finally joined the middle column west of the Fossum bridge.


Reconstructed Fossum bridge photographed in 2009 (bridge dates from 1961)


(See Wikipedia article on Fossum Bridge)

The reason for this manouver is not entirely clear to me. Either they expected some resistance in that area (totally clear of Norwegian troops) or they were aimed at another river crossing, north of the one the middle column approached. A river crossing they didn't find or didn't attempt for some reason.
On the 11th the brige at Fetsund was occupied by the Germans (on the 10th a motorized unit on a recon mission used the bridge, but no guards were left at the bridge. On the 12th there were also combat patrols beginning to test the roads leading south, east of lake Oeyeren.
The situation on the Norwegian side the 12:th of April
------------------------------------------------------
On the morning the 12 April the Norwegian troops were deployed as follows:
North front:

The important bridge over Glaama at Fetsund was taken undamaged by the Germans on the 11th after the Norwegian 2.Div, responsible for the defence of the area, had withdrawn to the north on the 10th without fight (more about that sometime in the future). Two patrols (10 men each) was sent to the area on the 10th, to report any German moves. They
were positioned at the two roads leading south, east of lake Oeyeren Company Orre (5 leaders, 60 men, 2 HMG, 3 LMG) at Troegstad church. The roads leading south was extensively blocked by trees. The one along the lake less than the others though.

West front:
The Askim detachment was an ad hoc unit consisting of the already organized artillery battalion II/A.R.1 and other personell from A.R.1 hastily organized into infantry units. The detachment was divided into five bridge groups to cover the five bridges and dams crossing Glaama at the river bend south of lake Oeyeren.

The bridegroups from north to south were:
Solbergfoss: 5 leaders, 73 men, 3 HMG
Langenes: 6 leaders, 65 men, 2 HMG
Fossum: 10 leaders, 120 men, 8 HMG
Kykkelsrud: 4 leaders, 40 men, 2 HMG
Vamma: 4 leaders, 40 men, 2 HMG
("leaders" are officers and NCOs) II/A.R.1
Two batteries of 75mm guns and one battery of 120mm howitzers around Askim.

South front:
A local defence company in Fredrikstad was ordered to Mysen, and left Fredrikstad in the morning. Greaaker fort west of Sarpsborg (just east of the bridge on the road to Fredrikstad) had 90 men with light weapons (none of the guns in the fort was available, as described
above).

Reserve: The two recently mobilized field battalions of I.R.1 (I, II/I.R.1) was assembled in the area Slitu-Jörntvedt-Ultveit for rest and exercises. The school battalion, built around the 1.Div school (the recruits undergoing their initial training), was positioned at Eidsberg and Rakkestadselva (a small river) south of the main position around Mysen, about half way to Sarpsborg.
An improvised third field battalion of I.R.1 (III/I.R.1) was organised in Slitu, around the school of 2.Div, that was in Fredrikstad on exercises when the invasion came. A motorized half battery
with two 75mm guns was positioned near Trögstad church, together with the supply train.

Fossumströkets fortress with Höytorp and Trögstad fort, had four 12 cm guns and two 7.5 cm guns in turrets, and two motorised 10.5 cm guns, ready to fire.

Reference #2
Events east of Oslofjord
This is a table of events east of Oslofjord (Östfold) between the 9/4 and 14/4. Given times might very well be wrong. They are however all taken from the best sources I have available. The position column gives the general area where the event occurred (if applicable). It is there to make it easier to follow a specific thread of events.

date time event position
6/4 II/AR1 are set up as neutrality watch. They are stationed outside Fredrikstad. They are not equipped with sharp ammunition. Ski

8/4 a.m. Message from the General Staff about the observation of transports and warships passing Denmark heading north. Some security arrangements are made and the school of 1.Div is organized as a field company. Sharp ammunition are distributed. Halden

9/4 00:XX Message from Horten to the 1.Div at Halden that Oslofjord coastal fortress is in combat with foreign combat ships. The units within the district are alerted. "Skjerped beredskap" is ordered.

9/4 02:05 Order to II/AR1 at Fredrikstad from Div.HQ to deploy concealed and spread out along the road northeast of Fredrikstad (anticipating air raids at daybreak), ready to march
toward Fossumströket fortress at Mysen, and take command over the school of 2.Div which is in the Fredrikstad area. Fredrikstad

9/4 04:00 March orders from battalion Commander to the batteries of II/AR1 are distributed. Batt.3 to Kleven (12km), Batt.4 to Kuröd (10km), Batt.5 to Pinneröd (9km), Combat supply train to Bisseröd (11km), 2.Div school to Visur (5km). Fredrikstad

9/4 04:30 II/AR1 leaves Fredrikstad. 2.Div school forms rear guard.
Fredrikstad

9/4 ca: 4-5 Order from Chief of General Staff to Div. HQ by phone to mobilize "if possible". A written order was under work. Halden

9/4 morning Commander of 1.Div (Gen. Erichsen) decides to order full and immediate mobilisation. This order is given to most units by phone. Halden

9/4 06:00 About 200 Germans are landed at Moss. More units are landed at Son further north. Moss

9/4 07:15 First German aircrafts are spotted above Fredrikstad

9/4 07:30 Written mobilisation order arrives from the General Staff. It does not specify full and immediate mobilization. Instead only the field brigade (1.Brig) and Fossumströket fortress is to be mobilized. This includes I and II/IR1, II/IR2, II/IR3 and II/AR1. First day of
mobilization would be 11th April. The Division did not call back the order about immediate mobilization it had given, but did send the order from the General Staff to the units it concerned. Thus they did get two orders. Halden

9/4 07:30 II/AR1 are ordered to continue their march toward Fossumströket fortress. The Commander decides not to march during daytime. Fredrikstad

9/4 08:30 The staff of A.R.1 leaves Oslo for Ski, where their depots are located. Oslo

9/4 09:00 The staff of A.R.1 arrives at Ski. Work on mobilization orders are commenced in accordance with the order from the General Staff and not the Division (see above). Ski

9/4 09:30 All batteries of II/AR1 have reached their initial targets, 9-12km NE Fredrikstad, and concealed themselves. Fredrikstad

9/4 a.m. II/AR1 organizes an ammunition column of three trucks to get artillery ammunition from Ski. The road over Askim is selected to avoid Germans around Moss. Fredrikstad

9/4 a.m. Reg.HQ of A.R.1 issues mobilization order of I/AR1. 11/4 is specified as first day of mobilization. II/AR1 in Fredrikstad has to divert officers for administrating the written mobilization orders to different areas. Oslo

9/4 all day The mobilization depots of I.R.1 in Fredrikstad are evacuated. They are first supposed to be transported to Tunöy (the Sarpsborg area), but after mistaken information about a
German column advancing from Moss, the depots are instead relocated to the Hafslund and Borgenhaugen area, south of Sarpsborg. Fredrikstad

9/4 p.m. Order of march for II/AR1 for the coming night is issued by the battalion Commander. The target is Gautestad south of Rakkestad (distance 25 km). Fredrikstad

9/4 17:00 Report to A.R.1 at Ski about a large German unit in Vestby (10km south Ski). It is decided not to attempt a mobilization at Ski. Ski

9/4 17:00 Report from bilkp.1 at Korsegården (near Ski) to A.R.1 that they have 70 men with almost no equipment at their depot (the depot is new and the equipment has not been delivered yet). They are ordered to Ski. Ski

9/4 18:00 The Commander of A.R.1 decides not to attempt mobilization at Ski, which might be attacked at any time. Instead the personnel available will evacuate as much of the depots as possible. Ski

9/4 18:00 The trucks with ammunition from Ski to II/AR1 returns to Ise.

9/4 21:00 Report about German patrols at Holstad, 4 km south Ski.

9/4 21:00 II/AR1 begin their night march to the Gautestad area.
Fredrikstad

9/4 21:00-22:00 A.R.1 leaves Ski for Askim in a column with 25 trucks carrying among other quipment two 75mm field guns and 28 HMG. Together with the personnel from the bilkp.1, which stays a little longer, they are 110 men. Ski

9/4 24:00 The column from Ski (A.R.1) arrives at Askim. The force of artillerymen is during the night organized into improvised infantry formations and a motorized half battery. The half battery has two 75mm field guns. They have the most essential equipment and 160 shells,
but no communication equipment. Askim

10/4 05:00 First defense is established at the Fossum bridge (one improvised MG-platoon of A.R.1) Askim

10/4 morning I and II/IR1 begins their mobilization in the area Hafslund-Skjeberg (southeast Fredikstad). Fredrikstad

10/4 morning Div. HQ orders extensive roadblocks to be established on the roads on the north front, east of lake Öyaren. north front
10/4 day The half battery/AR1 is ordered to Kykkelsrud, but returns to Askim later during the day. Askim

10/4 13:30 General orders for II/AR1 for the coming night is issued from the battalion Commander. March targets for the coming night are to be found and investigated and ammunition from the trucks should be distributed among the batteries. Rakkestad

10/4 19:30 Order of march for II/AR1 for the coming night is issued by the battalion Commander. The targets are:
Batt.3 to Lekum and Foss
Batt.4 to Salmonröd
Batt.5 to Eidsberg parsonage
Combat supply train to Trömborg. Rakkestad

10/4 evening Two patrols (10 men each) sent north toward Fetsund and Aurskog. north front

11/4 - Reports about landing of large amounts of German troops in Oslo arrives at the Div.HQ during the day. From the reports the Commander of 1.Div (Gen. Erichsen) estimates that 6-10000 men will be landed during the day and night. The overall strategy will thus be defensive. Reports also states that large amounts of troops are sent to Lilleström, at the north end of lake Öyaren. Mysen

11/4 - First Germans appear at the Fetsund bridge. north front

11/4 morning Company Orre is set up at Höytorp fort with personnel from 10.5cm gun battalion. Mysen

11/4 09:30 Comp. Orre sent to Trögstad church to cover the north front of 1.Div. north front

11/4 a.m. Commander of 1.Div orders I.R.1 to send one infantry company and one machine gun company to Monakrysset (near Höitorp fort at Mysen) and report to the Div.HQ. Mysen

11/4 10:00 General orders for II/AR1 for the day is issued from the battalion Commander. Positions for deployment of the batteries should be investigated:
Batt.3 in Askim area for support of the bridge defences at Glåma.
Batt.4 in the area Berg-Moen-Bakka
Batt.5 in the area Torkildsrud-Toverud-Vete
Batt.4 and 5 should support the defence of the bridges over Rakkestad and Lekumelva rivers. The reason for the emphasis of the defence of the southern approaches was that the Div.HQ considered a German landing in the Fredrikstad-Halden area, with a following advance north as probable.
Mysen

11/4 11:00 HQ, AAplt., kp.1 and kp.4 of I/IR1 (commanded by Maj. Fröholm) departs toward Monakrysset by car. These units will hereafter be called I/IR1. Fredrikstad 11/4 day The half battery/AR1 is placed under the command of the Commander of Höytorp. The are placed north of Höytorp and strengthened with a MG-platoon from kp.4/IR1. Mysen

11/4 12:30 The Askim group HQ is moved from Askim middle school to villa Furuset 1km east of Askim station. Askim

11/4 13:30 I/IR1 arrives at Monakrysset. They are given a half-battery from A.R.1 (2x75mm guns) and are grouped in the area Laslet, Jörntvedt, Ultvedt, Langsrud (between Mysen and Trögstad). Mysen

11/4 p.m. German north column reach Enebakk (Tangenbrua), according to message from local police representative there to Maj. Refsum. west of Glåma

11/4 evening At a meeting with the Division Commander, I/IR1 is ordered north to the Fetsund-Blaker area, to demolish the bridges over Glåma in the area. The order is later withdrawn as the battalion Commander claims that the troops are too exhausted. Neither are explosives found in enough quantities. Mysen

11/4 20:15 New orders for the deployment of II/AR1 are given, as it has become clear during the day that the German attack will come from west and probably already next morning. All of II/AR1 will be to the disposition by the Askim group (the unit responsible for the defence
of the Glåma river line in the Askim area). The Commander of the Askim group ordered the following deployment. ”Two batteries should be positioned to be able to support Bridge groups 2, 3 and 4 (Langenes,
Fossum and Kykkelrud) and one battery to support bridge group 5 at Vamma. Battalion HQ at Höiendal.” Mysen

11/4 24:00 The Fossum-group is reinforced with 4 off. and 60 men with 4 HMG. Askim

11-12/4 night Kp.2 and kp.3 of I/IR1 arrives at Slitu, by train and car, and is given lodging at Näringsrud. The whole I/IR1 is now assembled in this area. Mysen

11-12/4 night II/IR1 arrives at Slitu and is given lodging at Öierud, Näringsrud and Gislingrud (at the Askim-Mysen road). One company (kp.5) is already detached to Rakkestad though. Mysen

12/4 - Gutsche Detachment is formed in Lilleström (east of Oslo) by units from German IR340. It is a motorised column with 300 men under Cpt. Gutsche. It is ordered to advance toward Mysen on the east side of lake Öyaren. north front

12/4 ? The half battery/AR1 is placed under the command of II/AR1. They deploy 300m south Gurud farm but are later withdrawn. No shells are fired. Askim

12/4 02:00 German Gen. Engelbrecht informs Gen. Pellengahr that he has got new orders. He shall take Östfold (the area east of Oslofjord) to stop Norwegian mobilization and secure the German flank.[2] Oslo

12/4 02:00 Batt.5 II/AR1 (12cm how) in position near Askim church (Kirkehögda). Target area Langenes-Fossum-Kykkelsrud. The ammunition holds are 198 shells (159 granatkard. and 39 granater) Askim

12/4 04:30 Batt.3 II/AR1 in position at the western outskirts of Askim (separated into two half batteries). Target area Langenes-Fossum-Kykkelsrud. Askim

12/4 04:40 Batt.4 II/AR1 in position at Skole. Target area Kykkelsrud-Vamma Askim 12/4 early morning II/AR1 HQ at Höiendal
Combat supply train at Tömmerås Spotters at Torkildsrud (Vamma), Romsåsen (Kykkelsrud) and Tangen (Fossum). Communications within the artillery battalion is through field phones. Communications with the
bridge groups went through the permanent net and to the Askim group HQ through both field phones and permanent net. Askim

12/4 06:40 Report to Div.HQ about 15 trucks and busses passing Holstad, heading south. 12/4 ca:7 Report to the Fossum group from post at Spydeberg that 11 busses with Germans are passing, heading for Fossum. Askim

12/4 ca: 7 One or two busses with German soldiers arrives at the Fossum bridge. They are ambushed by the Norwegian machineguns and gets heavy losses.** Askim

12/4 08:00 Report to Div.HQ from Hoböl (?) that a motorised column is heading for Fossum. Askim

12/4 08:34 Batt.3/AR1 at Askim fires 39 shells against the western end of the Fossum bridge. 75 shells (granatkard.) are received from the supply services of the Askim detachment. Askim

12/4 09:00 I/I.R.1, under Maj. Fröholm, is ordered to detach kp.1 and kp.4 to reinforce the Askim detachment. Kp.4 is a reinforced MG company with 5 platoons with a total of 15 HMG. The detachment came to be known as "Group Gleditsch". Askim

12/4 09:00 Batt.4/AR1 at Skole, Hauger, makes ranging fire against Kykkelsrud. Barrages are prepared for two alternatives long the road Fossum-Askim. Askim

12/4 09:15 Batt.5/AR1 at Askim church makes ranging fire against Fossum bridge. The fire is targeted by the observer of Batt.3 at Tangen. Ranging is finished by 09:40. Askim

12/4 ca:9 I/I.R.1 except Group Gleditsch is ordered to secure the area between Solbergfoss and the south end of lake Öyaren. Askim

12/4 ca:9 Organization of an improvised third infantry battalion of I.R.1, under Captain A.T.Sunde, is ordered (III/IR1). It shall be organized in the farms around Slitu railway station, using the school of 2.Div as nucleus. Mysen

12/4 09:40 Gleditsch reports to Major Refsum in Askim and is ordered to stand as reserve at the Kykkelsrud road-cross. Ready to reinforce the defence at Kykkelsrud, Fossum or Langenes. Askim

12/4 ca:10 II/IR1 is ordered to Askim to reinforce the Askim detachment. II/IR1 has two inf. comp. and one MG-comp. Mysen
12/4 ca:10 Intensive fire from the German side. Attempts to cross the river are reported.** Askim

12/4 ca:10? Report from the Fossum group that the enemy has crossed the river south of the Fossum bridge (between Fossum and Kykkelsrud). Askim
12/4 10:30 Obst.leut. Haneborg (II/IR1), reports to Maj. Refsum in Askim. Haneborg is ordered to take command over group Gleditsch and the Fossum group and clear the eastern side of the river of Germans. Artillery support could be arranged over the local telephone net.
Askim

12/4 10-11 Maj. Refsum arranges that the dam at Solbergfoss lets out the water to break up the ice in the river. Askim

12/4 11:00 Batt.5/AR1 at Askim church fires five shells against enemy machine gun positions at Fossum bridge. Askim

12/4 ca:11 Kp.1 of Group Gleditsch is ordered to drive back the Germans that are reported to have crossed the river south of Fossum. The company gets lost in the forest north (!) of the bridge and doesn't report back until late in the evening. Askim

12/4 14:14 Batt.5/AR1 at Askim church fires against enemy vehicles on the road north and west Fossum. Askim

12/4 14:58 II/IR1 reports that it has reached the eastern side of the river without encountering any Germans.Askim

12/4 15:15* Maj. Maetschke reports that he has managed to gather vehicles to motorize his column. [2] Oslo

12/4 16:00 The Germans attempts to cross the river at Kykkelsrud but are beaten back by bridge group 4. Askim

12/4 ca:16 or 17 Intensive German fire against the Fossum group. Attempts to cross the river are reported.** Askim

12/4 16:55 Batt.5/AR1 at Askim church fires against the road at Fossum from 16:55 to 17:14 on request by the bridge defence. Askim

12/4 17:30 Order from Div.Commander that the "center group" (II/IR1 and group Gleditsch) shall be ready as mobile reserve in the Askim area.
Askim

12/4 17:40 Kp.1 of Group Gleditsch appears at the north flank of the Fossum group. Askim

12/4 18:00 Batt.4/AR1 at Skole fires against Fossum. 4 shells for ranging and 34 for effect. Rifle fire against the battery is reported, and infantry for protection is requested. Askim

12/4 evening Detachment Gutsche drives south on the east side of lake Öyaren. At Fjeldsrud it turns east. north front

12/4 21:45 Message from Div.Commander to Askim detachment that a strong German column has crossed lake Öyaren (on the ice), and that II/IR1 should be ready to march. They are ordered to Trögstad probable half an hour later. Askim

12/4 22:00 Kp.1 of Group Gleditsch reports back, tired to death after 12 hours in deep snow. Askim

12/4 22:30 The 10.5cm half-battery takes position at Lekumelva. Mysen

12/4 23:00 The half battery/AR1 are deployed at Gurud, south of the road. Askim

13/4 01:00* A platoon of kp.7 of II/IR362 crosses the Fossum bridge. [2] Askim

13/4 01:30* Maj. Wilck (Commander II/IR362) crosses the Fossum bridge. [2] Askim

13/4 02:00 II/IR1(under Maj. Haneborg) deploys in the Trögstad area. Trögstad

13/4 ca:2 Intensive German fire against the Fossum group**. Askim

13/4 02:30 Command post of I/IR1(under Maj. Fröholm) established at Örje.

13/4 03:00* The rest of kp.7 and a MG-platoon crosses the Fossum bridge. [2] Askim

13/4 03:00 The column under Maj. Maetschke enter Fredrikstad. [2] Fredrikstad

13/4 ca:3 Bridge group 5 at Vamma (3 off, 56 men, 2 HMG) is ordered to advance north toward Askim, to attack Germans advancing from Fossum in the flank. They do so, but when reaching batt.4/AR1 at Hauger they are instead ordered to act as infantry protection for the battery. Askim

13/4 03:30 Batt.3/AR1 at Askim is informed about the German advance and half the battery, with a more advanced position, is withdrawn to Lökengårdene south of Askim. Askim

13/4 03:30 Batt.4/AR1 at Skole is informed about the German advance and are ordered to retreat. They request permission to stay, and it is granted. Askim

13/4 03:30 Batt.5/AR1 at Askim church is informed about the German advance and are ordered to retreat over Askim - Korsegården to Tömmerås. Askim

13/4 04:15 Batt.5/AR1 leaves Askim church. Askim

13/4 04:30 Batt.4/AR1 at Skole fires barrage against the road Fossum-Askim. Range 3400m. Slow fire with 50m jump. 150 shells fired. Askim
13/4 04:55 Batt.5/AR1 at Askim church, is ordered to find a position between Sekkelstein and Tömmerås. (OBS, the same event as 03:30 but another time given - possibly a clarification of the first order, given when the battery passed the HQ in Askim) Askim

13/4 05:15 Batt.4/AR1 at Skole gets infantry protection from the Vamma bridge group. Later a platoon is received from the reserve group of the Askim detachment as well. Askim

13/4 05:15 Batt.5/AR1 arrives at Tömmerås. Askim

13/4 05:15 Bridge group 1 at Solbergfoss is reinforced with 3 off and 60 men Askim

13/4 05:30* Jagdkommando Manthey crosses the Fossum bridge. [2] Askim

13/4 05:35 kp.3 and 4 of III/IR1 (organising around Slitu) are ordered to Berger, northeast of Askim. kp3 and 4 are line units. The rest of the battalion are local defence units. The battalion are therefore subsequently called local defense battalion (Lv.bat./IR1). Mysen

13/4 06:00 Group Gleditsch, positioned about 1.5km west Askim, comes into firefight with advancing German troops. Askim

13/4 06:15 Batt.5/AR1 at Tömmerås is ordered to deploy. Askim

13/4 morning Batt.4/AR1 at Skole fires at enemy positions around Romsås-Krokås during the morning. Observation is done by cpt. Gleditsch. Probably the fire that hit the Norwegian 1.kp at 6.30 is fired by Batt.4. Later an enemy command post is sighted at Rom skole. Fire
against it (brisantgranat) and then at infantry in the terrain (granatkard.). The battery is also hit by enemy artillery. No losses.
Askim

13/4 06:30 A counterattack by 1.kp. on the right flank of group Gleditsch, against Skole is ordered by cpt. Gleditsch. It's unclear when the attack is done, but it was thrown back by the fire from German Machine guns. Askim

13/4 06:15 Batt.5/AR1 at Tömmerås is ready in position 300m north Sekkelstein. Askim

13/4 06:45 Batt.5/AR1 sends a radio equipped spotter team to the battalion Commander at Höiendal. Askim

13/4 ca: 7 kp.3 and 4 of III/IR1 arrives at Berger, northeast of Askim. kp.3 is ordered to N.Hov to protect a machine gun platoon there, while kp.4 (weak machine gun company) takes position at Berger (2HMG) and at heights northeast of Askim (2HMG). Askim

13/4 ca: 7 From around 07:00 batt.3/AR1 at Askim fires at enemy positions around Rom and Skole. This continues over the morning. 50 grenades are received from the holdings of II/AR1. Askim

13/4 07:00* The column under Maj. Maetschke leaves Fredrikstad, heading for Sarpsborg. 19 men on bicycles crosses the river, to advance south of it. Fredrikstad

13/4 07:30 The half battery/AR1 at Gurud fires 50 shells (granatkardesh) against infantry platoon at Rom skole. Askim

13/4 07:30 Batt.5/AR1 at Tömmerås ready to fire. No requests are made though. Askim

13/4 07:55 Lv.bat./IR1 at Slitu is ordered to be ready to march. Mysen

13/4 08:00 German detachment Gutsche reach Sletner farm after a night of clearingextensive roadblocks. Gutsche decides to turn back and take the road over Båstad insted (following lake Öyaren). north front
13/4 09:00* Maj. Wilck establishes a command post two km west of Askim. [2] (this should be the one taken under fire by batt.4/AR1) Askim

13/4 09:25 Air alarm at Batt.4/AR1. Askim

13/4 late morning Batt.4/AR1 fires at prepared fire zones and by observation from Cpt. Gleditsch. Askim

13/4 a.m kp.1 of group Gleditsch counterattacks against German forces in the area of Rom and Skole. They are however driven back by machinegun fire. Then they are ordered to hold a defensive position. Own artillery support hits them though, and they retreats in disorder to
northeast. The artillery support could possibly be the one against Rud at 11:00 (I must admit I haven't been able to locate Rud), or fire by Batt.4 after the German attack at 12:00. The later makes more sense, though it is unclear in [1] whether Batt.4 fired at that time.
Askim

13/4 11:00 The half battery/AR1 at Gurud fires 40 shells (granatkard.) against Germans at the farm Rud Askim 13/4 12:00 Bridge group 4 at Kykkelsrud withdraws to southeast, following a route further south than the route of retreat specified by higher command, thereby opening the left flank of group Gleditsch. Askim

13/4 12:00 The Germans attack out of the bridgehead at Fossum bridge. Askim

13/4 12:00 Batt.4/AR1 possibly fires defensive fire directed by Cpt. Gleditsch. [1 s.216] Askim

13/4 12:25 Air alarm at Batt.4/AR1 at Skole. The battery is sighted. The battery gets a new grouping area at Sekkelstein (either due to fear of air attack, or due to the German advance). They don't leave until 14:00 though. Askim

13/4 12:30 Germans advance over the Skjolden farms from south west. Askim

13/4 12:30 The half battery/AR1 at Gurud is withdrawn due to the enemy presence at Skjolden. The attached MG-platoon stays. Askim

13/4 12:30 The western half of batt.3/AR1 is taken under fire by an enemy gun. It continues for some time (30-40 shells during 2 (?) hours) and a reported enemy gun position at Skjolden is taken under fire.
Askim

13/4 12:40 The Commander of the Askim detachment decides to retreat. One group to Sekkelstein 3 km east of Askim on the road to Mysen, and one group to Korsegården, on the same distance on the road to Trögstad. His HQ moves to Gislingrud. The retreat is not done immediately though. It seems that it is done around 15:00. Askim

13/4 13:00 Batt.5/AR1 at Tömmerås is ordered by Maj. Refsum to retreat to Gislingrud. Askim

13/4 13:00 Commander 1.Div orders creation of a defensive line anchored at Höitorp fort. Mysen

13/4 14:00 Batt.4/AR1 at Hauger leaves for Sekkelstein. When approaching Sekkelstein the area is under air attack, and a new position south of Lekumelva river is given. Askim

13/4 14:10 Lv.bat./IR1 is ordered to take position in the line between the fortifications. Mysen

13/4 14:30 Batt.5/AR1 arrives at Gislingrud. Radio equipped spotter patrol sent out. Askim

13/4 14:45 Telephone lines laid between Batt.5/AR1 and the command post of Maj. Refsum at Gislingrud. Askim

13/4 15:00 Batt.5/AR1 ready to fire. The radio patrol couldn't get through and no requests arrive. Enemy aircrafts over the battery are taken under fire by the AAMG. Askim

13/4 15:30 The Germans under Maj. Wilck. enter Askim [2] Askim

13/4 16:00 Batt.3/AR1 withdraws from Askim toward Mysen. (this seems very late as Askim should have been controlled by the Germans for half an hour by then - either the time is wrong or the battery had already made a shorter withdrawal) Askim

13/4 16:30 Batt.5/AR1 is ordered to retreat to Skifterudengen.. Askim

13/4 17:30 [S] German detachment Gutsche reach the roadblock at S. Hov defended by company Orre (north of Trögstad fort). A two hour firefight follows. Trögstad

13/4 17:30 Batt.4/AR1 arrives to the area Uldal - Haga - Falkenborg, with the assigned target area Sulerud - Fusk - Sekkelstein. Mysen

13/4 18:00 Batt.3/AR1 arrives at the crossroad at Momarka (Monakrysset), near Höitorp fort. Here it is ordered by the Commander of II/AR1 to go into position west of Gislingrud, together with batt.5. Later it had to withdraw to Härland, east of Mysen, without having fired
from the Gislingrud position. Mysen

13/4 18:20 Batt.4/AR1 is ordered to Härland church. Mysen

13/4 18:30 Batt.5/AR1 arrives at Härland church. Mysen

13/4 19:00 The Germans under Maj. Maetschke enter Fredriksten in Halden. [2]

13/4 19:00 At a Norwegian staff meeting the Commander of 1.Div decides to withdraw to a line along the lakes around Örje. Mysen

13/4 20:00 The firefight between cmp.Orre and det.Gutsche ends when the dark falls and Gutsche decides to retreat as he is afraid to be outflanked and cut off. The detachment returns to Fetsund, where he is promptly relieved of his command. Trögstad.

13/4 21:00 The Germans under Maj. Wilck reach Monakrysset (roadcrossing north Mysen). Mysen

13/4 22:00 The Germans under Maj. Wilck enter Mysen. [2] Mysen

13/4 23:00 Batt.5/AR1 leaves Härland for Örje. Askim

14/4 04:00 The retreating Norwegians at Örje are taken under fire. Probably by mistake from nervous Norwegians. Örje

14/4 08:27 German attack on Höitorp fort begins. Mysen

14/4 14:16 Höitorp fort surrenders to the Germans. They had one dead (friendly fire) but many nervous breakdowns. Mysen

14/4 20:00 At a staff meeting it is agreed on that the Norwegian troops are demoralized and unfit for combat. The Germans has so far not pursued the retreating Norwegians, but the Commander (Erichsen) nevertheless decides to withdraw the whole force into Sweden.

* Until the 13th of April the Germans used German time, which was one hour after Norwegian time. Thus I have added one hour to times originating from German sources. These are marked with an "*" as I can't be sure that this correction haven't already been made in my sources, or directly by the Germans in their diaries etc.
** From later interviews with Norwegian soldiers. Especially the times given may be wrong.

Sources:
When nothing else is stated the source is Krigen i Norge, Operationerna i Östfold.
[1] Krigen i Norge, Operationerna i Östfold.
[2] Vi dro mot Nord, Sven T Arneberg and Kristian Hosar.

Norwegian Army: Training and Doctrine

The Norwegian army relied on conscription, with a cadre of professional officers. After a period of heavy cutbacks after the First World War, the Norwegian army was in an all but satisfactory state at the beginning of World War II. The training of the regular infantryman was among the shortest in Europe (the shortest according to some sources, but I haven't been able to find comparative figures for other countries). After being as short as 48 days in the beginning of the
thirties, it was gradually increased first to 60, then to 72 and finally 84 days. In addition only two thirds of each annual contingent were trained. No repetition exercises were held after initial
training. There were also a shortage of officers, and the average age of the officers were high. It was realized that the short training of the troops in addition to all other shortcomings would
make the units all but useless for anything else than defense, until the units could get more training and cohesion. The preferred defensive position would be on heights overlooking an open country, where the heavy machineguns could be used to their full potential. The
appearance of tanks complicated the picture, as the position now also must include something blocking the advance of the tanks.

Equipment: The equipment of the army was fairly standard, compared with other European countries of that time. The personal weapon was bolt action rifles. Each team (squad) had a light machine gun, and the heavy company of the battalion had heavy machine guns. There were
also mortars in the battalion. The brigade had an artillery battalion. The infantry moved by foot, the artillery were horse drawn and the supply trains were partly horse drawn and partly motorized. So far the Norwegian army was no worse off than most other armies of the period.
Compared with better kept armies of other countries there were a lot amiss though. For close fighting there were no hand grenades and no sub machine guns. There were no anti tank weapons of any kind. The mortars were pitifully few, with only two for a battalion. The only
anti aircraft weapon available for the field units were machine guns. The artillery was old and of small caliber. There was little radio equipment.

Organization: The Norwegian army was led by the commanding general and his staff - Over command of the Army (H.O.K.). Under H.O.K there were six district commands (D.K.), each administrating the units within its area. In each district there was a Division, having the military
command over the units in the district, except for those commanded directly by the Over command (H.O.K.).

The administrative unit responsible for barracks, depots etc, were the regiments. In the infantry and artillery there were no field regiments though. Instead the battalions and batteries mobilized
by the regiments were independent units under the Divisions, or organized into Brigades. Each District Command fielded one Brigade. The Cavalry (Dragon) regiments did however mobilize a field regiment each, as well as a number of smaller units.

Infantry: The main fighting formations of the Norwegian army were the six Infantry Brigades. They were supplemented by a number of independent battalions. Each Brigade had four infantry battalions, an artillery battalion and a bicycle company.

Cavalry: The cavalry were the mobile units of the Norwegian army. Their mission was delaying actions, flank protection and reconnaissance. The biggest cavalry units were the three dragon regiments. Each infantry brigade also had a bicycle company. The carbine squadrons (companies) were either mounted on horses or bicycles. The machine
gun squadrons were either horse drawn or motorized. The cavalry were also equipped for operations on ski, something that the ordinary infantry often were not.

The cavalry units differed from the infantry in that they had their support functions (engineers, supply and sanitary) distributed on a lower level than in the infantry. Thus the cavalry squadron
had their own supply group, sanitary group etc, while in the infantry, these functions were on battalion level. This was of course in order to make it possible for the cavalry squadrons to operate independently in another way than the infantry companies.

Artillery: For each district command (D.K.) there was either a field artillery regiment or a mountain artillery battalion, depending on terrain and infrastructure of the district. In addition
there were two artillery battalions on army level. In all there were three field artillery regiments, two motorized field artillery battalions, three mountain artillery battalions and a couple of
independent motorized field artillery batteries.

Except for the two motorized battalions on army level and a couple of batteries in northern Norway, all artillery was horse drawn. In reality many of the batteries used improvised motorization, with the guns carried on trucks (they could not be drawn by trucks, due to the
wooden spooked wheels).

Most of the Norwegian artillery pieces were from before WW1. The most notable exception was the 12cm field howitzer m/32. This was a Norwegian design that was used by one of the motorized battalions. The most important contribution of the Norwegian artillery was probably as anti tank units. There was a complete lack of anti tank weapons in the Norwegian inventory. There were no armor piercing ammunition available for the artillery guns either, but the light tanks used by the
German forces in Norway were vulnerable to hits by the high explosive shells from the 7.5cm guns. Mostly the guns operated single or in pairs. The biggest concentration of Norwegian artillery were in the short battle for Östfold (11th to 13th April) were a full artillery battalion (among them a battery of 12cm howitzers) and improvised infantry units from A.R.1, as well as some fortress artillery took the heaviest burden of the fighting. There were also the battles in
Valdres where a mountain artillery battalion participated with good results.

Engineers: All engineer units in southern Norway had their barracks and depots at the Engineer Regiment outside Hönefoss, northwest of Oslo. There were also an engineer battalion in Trondheim and a unit in northern Norway. There were two branches; the signal troops and the
pioneers.

The signal troops were responsible for telephone and radio communications of the army. There were not much radio equipment, and on battalion level the communication were entirely by
telephone and courier. A fact that was very unfortunate for the Norwegians during the fluid and fast moving campaign.
The pioneers were responsible for roadwork, field fortifications and most importantly roadblocks and bridge destructions. The Norwegian defense usually relied heavily on roadblocks and destroyed bridges. These were especially important due to the lack of anti tank weapons.

Reference #3
Norwegian Army Mobilization east of Oslofjord Within D.K.1 (1st District Command): The 1st District command was divided into two parts
by the Oslofjord. Oslo was a special case, where units belonging to both 1st and 2nd district had their depots.

East of Oslofjord
1.Divisjon Headquarter: Commander: GeneralMajor C.J. Erichsen
1.Divisjon school (11 off, ? pupils, ? LMG, 3 HMG, 1 mortar): Commander: Captain Fritzner
2.Divisjon school (7 off, 87 pupils, 9 LMG): Commander: Captain A.T. Sunde
I.R.1 (Infantry Regiment 1)
Regimental staff I.R.1 Commander: Major J.T. Hagle
I/IR1 - mobilized more or less according to plan at Borgenhaugen, east Fredrikstad, where the depots at Fredrikstad had been evacuated to on 9.April. Commander: Major Frøholm
II/IR1 - mobilized more or less according to plan at Hafslund farm, east Fredrikstad, where the
depots at Fredrikstad had been evacuated to on 9.April. Commander: Oberstlt. Haneborg III/IR1 - organized around the Landverns (local defense) battalion of IR1. Commander: Captain Sunde
Skolebataljonen (school battalion): Under formation near Mysen with the personnel from the schools of 1.Div and 2.Div as nucleus, when the Germans overran the area on 13 April.
Commander: Captain Fritzner
A.R.1 (Artillery Regiment 1) at Ski
II/AR1 was already mobilized as part of the neutrality defense, and was stationed outside Fredrikstad when the invasion came. Commander: Major Sevaldson
- stabsbatt. (staff battery) Commander: Captain Fjeld
- btt.3 (13 off, 121 men) Commander: Captain Østbye
- btt.4 (10 off, 121 men) Commander: Captain Graff
- btt.5 (134 off and men) Commander: Captain Sæhlie
Askim detachment: Improvised mobilization from personnel and equipment mainly from
I/A.R.1 at Ski, and units detached from other formations. Began set up at Ski 9 April but evacuated to Askim during the day, where set up continued to 12 April. The organization of the detachment varied considerably as units were detached to it and then recalled. The units listed below were part of the detachment through the battle, and all but group Gleditch were set up at Askim. Commander: Major Refsum
- Bridge Groups; five bridge groups were set up in Askim, to defend the bridges over river Glaama.

On the morning of 12.April they had the following strengths:
+ Solbergfoss: 5 leaders, 73 men, 3 HMG
+ Langenes: 6 leaders, 65 men, 2 HMG
+ Fossum: 10 leaders, 120 men, 8 HMG
+ Kykkelsrud: 4 leaders, 40 men, 2 HMG
+ Vamma: 4 leaders, 40 men, 2 HMG
- Motorized 7.5cm gun half-battery. Commander: Captain R. Nordlie
- reserve group (300 men) Commander: Major C. Munthe-Kaas
- Group Gleditch; detached from IR1. Commander: Captain Gleditsch
+ kp.1/I/IR1
+ kp.4/I/IR1

Fossumströket festning: Built in 1912-18. Defending the approaches to the Askim area and the river crossings there. Set up began on 10.April. Only a fraction of listed personnel turned up (ca 50%). Most of the vehicles for the motorized artillery could not be collected (should be
requisitioned from civilian trucks). The fortress was also housing the barracks and magazines of the two motorized artillery battalions of the Norwegian army. These were situated at Høytorp fort. Commander: Oberstlt. Rodtwitt Høytorp fort: The two 12cm guns in turrets were ready on 12. April evening. The rest of the fortress artillery (2x7.5cm gun (turret), 8x8.4cm pivot gun m/1887 (emplacements), 4x12cm howitzers (pit) and 4x7.5cm field gun m/01 (carried on trucks)) was not readied
before the capitulation on 14. April. Mainly due to lack of personnel. The fort did have equipment for approx. 2 to 3 battalions of infantry. Commander: Major Sødring

Trøgstad fort: The two 12 cm guns in turrets and two 7.5cm guns in turrets were ready on 11.April evening. The eight 8.4 cm pivot gun (emplacements, Krupp m/1887) and four 7.5cm field gun m/01 (carried on trucks) did not take part in any combat as far as known. Commander: Captain Stenersen

Motorized 12cm howitzer battalion: Mobilized at Høytorp with reduced personnel, lack of vehicles, and five of the eight 12cm howitzers. Unable to obtain any ammunition, they were unable to participate in the fighting. Motorized 10.5cm gun half-battery: Mobilized at Høytorp. The motorized 10.5 cm gun battalion (12 guns) only manage to field 2 guns due to a lack of rubber for the wheels! Organized as a half-battery, It was put under the command of II/AR1. Commander: Captain Gudmundsen
2 off, 28 men, 2 10.5cm guns, 6 vehicles

kompanie Orre (infantry company): set up at Høytorp. Commander: Major Orre (5 off, 60 men, 3 LMG, 2 HMG)

Intendanturkp.1 (supply company): was set up south of Trøgstad and began work on 12 April evening. Commander: Løvenskjold

1.Brigade: Was under formation around Mysen, with an improvised organization (I, II, III/IR1 and the school battalion as infantry battalions, and II/AR1 as the artillery battalion), when the
Norwegian defense along river Glåma collapsed.

I.R.2 (Infantry Regiment 2) in Oslo: I/IR2 was already mobilized as part of the neutrality defense, and was stationed at Stavanger when the invasion came.

II/IR2 mobilization was stopped before it began, when Oslo capitulated to the Germans.

L/IR2 mobilization was stopped before it began, when Oslo capitulated to the Germans.

German Army assault forces east of Oslofjord
196. Inf.Div
7.Welle, Wehrkreis XX (Danzig) Generalmajor Pellengahr
Follow up through Oslo to Swedish border
Infanterie-Regiment 340 Oberst Hermann Fischer
Losses to submarines on transport from Germany
Infanterie-Regiment 345 Oberst Ländle
Big losses to submarines on transport from Germany
Infanterie-Regiment 362 Oberstleutnant Schaller
Artilleri-Regiment 233 (3 Abt. lFH)
Panzerjäger-Kompanie 233
Radfahrschwadron 233
Pionier-Bataillon. 233
Nachrichten-Abt. 233
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Mark Riley
United Kingdom
Bridport
Dorset
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I think there's a typo in line 3,783
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David Kershaw
Ireland
Belfast
Northern Ireland
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Lines of Battle: Quatre Bras 1815. Brunswick hussar.
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One word suggestion: "Crete".
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D T P
United States
Pikeville
North Carolina
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The Battle for Normandy. Game suggestion; COBRA: The Normandy Campaign

Or The Battle of the Bulge, Game suggestion; Ardennes
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Robert Stuart
United States
Los Alamos
New Mexico
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The battles in the Vosges Mountains. For starting information you can look at When the Odds Were Even by Avery.
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