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Jesse Dean
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Suburbia, by Ted Aslpach and published by Bezier and Lookout Games, is a tile laying and drafting game focused on the development of the suburb’s around a generic city. The players have the ability to build their suburb to match their own particular goals with the ultimate measure of achievement being total population. Growth must be managed in an intelligent manner, however, as advancing too rapidly can stifle both your financial income as well as your ability to attract new residents to the city.

I requested a review copy of Suburbia from Mr. Alspach, and he concurred, going so far as to offer me a pre-production copy of the game to play and review. This review is based on that copy and thus does not reflect the game’s final components.



Form, Functionality, and Theme
While I cannot discuss Suburbia’s final components, I can discuss how the game’s design and form stand in the way of or facilitate game play. Unlike many modern board games, though intriguingly like many of Lookout Game’s usual games, Suburbia’s board is divided into many sections that can be arranged during play to suit the convenience of the players. This is not very relevant for people who have play spaces that are well suited to modern board games, but it does enable Suburbia to travel well, which is something I have already used to my advantage.

The components are also quite effective at presenting the information you need to know without requiring reference to the rulebook or the included player aid. Part of this is because of the simplicity of the game, but the publisher has done an excellent job in ensuring that the game’s components effectively convey game state information. There are a few tiles that give bonuses whenever anyone places a tile of a particular type, and the one area where I think the game may have been improved is by including some sort of board that allowed for players to easily keep track of which bonuses would be given to who when a tile is purchased. Of course, this would also increase the fiddliness of the game, so perhaps the decision to do without was correct, particularly considering the weight and expected length of the game. If players are attentive, or play regularly, it should not be much of an issue anyway.



I also quite enjoyed the art. The use of meeples for population is perhaps a bit much, but the individual tile art does an effective job of conveying the theme, and the way they are drawn definitely helps to make it feel like you are seeing the expansion and growth of the suburbs of a city. One of the deepest bits of satisfaction I get after playing a game like Carcassonne is to look at the board after the game is done and look at how the final arrangement of the tiles and how it logical, or illogical it is. I get some of that same enjoyment out of Suburbia, as I consider the character of the part of the city that I built.

It helps that the functions of each tile is tightly related to the sort of building it is associated with. This includes modifiers that make logical sense, and encourage you to build the sort of suburb that would thrive based on those tiles existence. Landfills increase your income but decrease your reputation for each other adjacent tile except a lake. Office buildings improve your income based on adjacent commercial locations, as do warehouses, though warehouses also decrease your reputation. These modifiers both add to the total amount of consideration that goes into tile placement, while also encouraging the creation of realistic map. The fact that it does this organically, with nudges and modifiers, rather than with hard restrictions only makes it better.

Basic Structure
On a given turn of Suburb you have four options: purchase a tile from the drafting row, purchase a basic tile from the general stock, place a lake, or place one of your three doubling tokens. Each of these options will result in the removal of a tile from the drafting area, ensuring that the game keeps moving at a consistent pace, and forcing players to make decisions about the general availability of tiles.

Purchasing a tile from the drafting row costs the building’s base cost plus an additional surcharge based on how recently it came out. This is the core action of the game and the one that will be taken most frequently. In addition to the tiles available in the drafting row, there is a set of three different tiles that can be purchased on a player’s turn as availability permits, each of which represents a basic building block: a community park, a suburb, and a heavy industry factory. When one of these tiles is selected, one of the tiles on the drafting row is removed from the game, with the cost being the basic building tile’s cost plus an additional cost based on the removed tile’s location on the drafting track. Lakes, which provide instant cash infusions, work in much the same way, but the only cost of them is the drafting surcharge of the removed tile. The doubling tokens, which double the effect of a tile, each require the player to pay the cost of the building they are doubling again, and the same drafting surcharge based on the tile they choose to remove for their action.

After a player purchases and places their tile, they receive two types of income. The first, which is actually called income, gives cash for further purchases. The other, reputation, provides population, or victory point, income. As players move up the scoring track they will pass red lines, each of which decreases their income and reputation by 1 as they pass it. Having a negative reputation or income forces the player to pay cash or reduce their population. If they have insufficient cash to pay for the negative income then they lose population.

The available tiles are seeded into “A”, “B”, and “C” stacks. In the “C” stack is further seeded a “One More Round” tile. When this tile shows up, there is one more complete round and the game ends.

Suburban Snowball
At its most basic level Suburbia is an economic snowball game. Being able to effectively win the game requires players to maintain cash flow, and the most effective way to do this is typically to buy tiles that provide the player with money every round. This becomes even more relevant once you begin accumulating population and begin to cross the red lines. If a player starts gaining reputation too quickly in comparison to income, it is very easy to get caught in a vicious cycle where the player is unable to buy the tiles needed to increase their income while still gaining population. Eventually, this population increase will come to a halt, and income will become negative, forcing population down until the player is forced down enough categories that income becomes neutral again. If this happens I see very few situations where a player will be able to win the game, though this particular event should not be common. Players have the escape valve of lakes to gain an instant cash infusions, there are cheap income increasing tiles in the common supply, and most players will realize the importance of income quickly and will balance income vs. reputation needs.

This does create a certain amount of narrowness in the game’s strategy. You must spend a significant amount of your actions either acquiring instant cash infusions or income increases. Decisions about when and how to increase your population should largely be related to what the impact those choices will have on your finances. It is also a good idea to spend the first part of the game trying to maximize your income, as this will enable you to more effectively gain population later in the game without crippling your ability to purchase further tiles. The fact that many of the earlier residential buildings provide more population then later ones is particularly interesting as a result of this, as it makes them usually better in a straight cost to benefit ratio, but worse because of their impact on your game state. You do not want lots of population at the beginning of the game, and getting population during your turn, when it will have an immediate impact on your income and reputation values, is usually worse than reputation increases which push up your population at the end of the round, when it won’t have an immediate impact on your cash and population income.

Decision Points
If this was all there was to the game, I would not be that fond of Suburbia. At this point in time I have had my fill of generic economic snowball games, and every time I play one I end up indifferent at best about it. Luckily, the snowball aspects of this game are pretty easy to manage, and thus the focus shifts to tile interactions, drafting, and goals.

There are three levels of tile interactions. At the most basic level, a tile will only have an effect based on those tiles that are adjacent to it, usually with some sort of restriction that makes it so any bonuses or penalties provided by that tile are not universal. At the next level, tiles provide a modifier for each other tile of a type that a player has built in their own, personal suburb. These are usually strong enough to change a player’s calculations about the value of tiles of that type, and can end up being the backbone of slightly more strategic play. The final level gives bonuses for every tile of a specific type, regardless of who has or will build them. These are my favorite type of tile because of how they increase both the competition and the overall decision-making complexity, particularly as players get more experienced. The numerous tile interaction both reward skill and provide for new dimensions for decisions as players begin to more fully understand how the entire universe of tiles interacts with each other.



The drafting mechanic provides both the means for players to shape the available tile pool, both by taking tiles for themselves and by eliminating tiles that could help another player’s board position. The latter is particularly relevant for players taking actions besides the “draft a tile” action, as they can eliminate tiles without having to necessarily take a tile that would be suboptimal for them. They are still frequently hurting themselves slightly by taking an action besides the “draft a tile” action, as that will frequently be the best one, but there are at least a few occasions a game when you will want to do so, and if you are able to time it such that you can negatively impact another player’s strategy then it can exponentially increase whatever benefits you would have otherwise accrued for simply taking the secondary action. This removal is even more relevant for types of tiles, such as airports, that can greatly aid a player that is already specialized in that type even if someone else builds it; you are eliminating the ability of that player to take the tile and eliminating any benefits they would get from someone else acquiring the tile.

The fact that only a subset of the total tiles is used in any given game deeply impacts the game’s replayability, but I think that the variable goals bring something more to the table. Each player gets two personal goals, which only they know about and can achieve, in addition to a number of goals equal to the number of players which everyone is competing over. All of these goals are centered on having the most or least of each of the most commonly dealt with aspects of the game, such as reputation, residential tiles, or cash on hand though there are a few that provide bonuses for specialized categories, like airports, or contiguous lake tiles. Each one provides a significant amount of bonus points at the end of the game, and by making it so that a particular thing is more valuable it can dramatically affect the level of competition for that thing from game to game. This is particularly true for public goals that reward a player for having the least of something. These goals encourage all but the last two players to give up on the goal early on, allowing them to gain easier access to certain types of tiles, while those two players are caught in a position where deciding if the incremental advantages available from buying a certain tile may be overshadowed by the dedicated victory point bonuses that they will be given to their last remaining opponent at the end of the game. With experienced players, it can also be worthwhile to do the same against players whom are giving indications that they have certain hidden goals, though this also leads to the potential for misconceptions and deliberate deceptions.

Conclusion
Suburbia is a middle-weight euro game. Those who have followed my reviews and writings both here, and over at my blog will know that I have reached the point where the vast majority of middle weight eurogames are unable to maintain my interest. I prefer something bigger and meatier or, if, I am going to play a shorter game, a card game of some sort. Essentially I need to have a lot of things going on for a game to maintain my interested, if it is too simple or easily explored I get bored and ultimately the game turns me off.

Suburbia is able to overcome this by the depth and breadth of its combo-building opportunities. While the number of different tile is not anywhere near the quantity of say, Race For the Galaxy, how they build and react to each other sort of reminds me of that game. I always like exploring off-the-wall or obscure strategies in combo-building games, and Suburbia has some elements of this. Some tiles only come truly alive with the presence of certain goals, and other tiles are only really useful if certain other tiles are available. This all adds to my overall enjoyment of the game and increases the feeling that there is a lot more potential for me to be able to explore the game effectively. Each game brings me something a little new, and thus gives me a greater reason to push on.

I like Suburbia, and it is likely to maintain a long term position in my collection, due to its approachability and my general level of continued enjoyment. It will never be one of my favorites though, due to the rather naked nature of the economic snowball aspects of the game. In other games I like with economic snowball elements, 18XX being perhaps the most prominent example, the snowball elements are more concealed within the larger structure of the game. The entire victory point system of Suburbia is centered on this, and while the game is not about that snowball, it is too transparent for me to be able to completely embrace the game. I still find the game to be deeply satisfying, and it may very well be my favorite middle weight euro at this point in time. Its strengths are strong enough that it is able to overcome something that is normally a deal breaker for me. That alone is impressive.
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Oliver Kiley
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Nice review.

I was immediately reminded of Glen More - although Glen More appears to have fallen pretty flat for you. I'm wondering if you might be able to highlight distinctions between the two that makes this game a relative hit while Glen More was not.

On the surface, they have some similarities - tile building in private areas but drafting tiles from a common tile pool/track. The drafting currency in Glen More in time instead of a direct currency (i.e. taking a tile further down the track gives your opponent more turns until they pass you).

Cheers!
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Jesse Dean
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Yes, it does remind me of Glen More quite a bit, though when I compared it to Glen More strongly in my initial pre-release predictions article, someone accused me of never having played a drafting game and implied said that I was an idiot for comparing it to Glen More in the first place. shake

I think the key thing that pushes Suburbia above Glen More for me is that the spatial component of the game is the greater level of complexity. Because of how many different ways that the tiles can interact with each other, the goal tiles, and the different options you have with your turn, Suburbia ends up providing a richer, more entertaining experience. Glen More was more innovative then Suburbia for sure, but I think Suburbia is a deeper game, and thus is more rewarding of continued play. Note: this is based on 11 plays of Glen More and 8 plays of Suburbia.
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Mark Jackson
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I think there's a thematic engagement in Suburbia that isn't present in Glen More... you are building a city and the component parts of that city interact with each other in ways that make thematic sense, thus drawing you deeper into the game.
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Patrick Korner
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doubtofbuddha wrote:
Yes, it does remind me of Glen More quite a bit, though when I compared it to Glen More strongly in my initial pre-release predictions article, someone accused me of never having played a drafting game and implied said that I was an idiot for comparing it to Glen More in the first place. shake

I think the key thing that pushes Suburbia above Glen More for me is that the spatial component of the game is the greater level of complexity. Because of how many different ways that the tiles can interact with each other, the goal tiles, and the different options you have with your turn, Suburbia ends up providing a richer, more entertaining experience. Glen More was more innovative then Suburbia for sure, but I think Suburbia is a deeper game, and thus is more rewarding of continued play. Note: this is based on 11 plays of Glen More and 8 plays of Suburbia.


Thanks for mentionining (as an aside, but no matter) the number of times you've played the game - makes a big difference to the level of credence I ascribe to the review.

I'm glad to hear this one sounds good, as I have a copy coming as well.

pk
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Jesse Dean
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Yeah, I am thinking of just making it a part of my Disclosure paragraph from now on. So that way people know what depth of experience I have when writing about the game.
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Jacob Lee
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I enjoyed your article. It must feel good to be in a position where publishers consider sending you review copies because of the fairness of your reviews. I also appreciate knowing how many sessions you played of a game. I don't think anyone would mess with someone who's played a game eight times. I expect it will take me two years to play Suburbia eight times when I get my copy.
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Jesse - will you come out with an updated Essen-interest-list before the convention starts?

More rules came out since your last update and I would be pretty interested what your current thoughts are based on the current information.
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Bruce Keeney
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Excellent review. You summarize the game play very well.

Quote:
The numerous tile interaction both reward skill and provide for new dimensions for decisions as players begin to more fully understand how the entire universe of tiles interacts with each other.

Quote:
... and most players will realize the importance of income quickly and will balance income vs. reputation needs.


The game definitely has a learning curve so that new players will struggle their first game against experienced ones. I've played three (or four??) times and in two of them there was a tight battle for 1st between the two experienced players, with the two newbies far behind battling for 3rd. Rewarding experience and good play is a real plus.

I'd like to say this is the long sought short (60 minutes) Civilization Building grail game - but in the end you've only built a suburb.

Quote:
The fact that only a subset of the total tiles is used in any given game deeply impacts the game’s replayability, but I think that the variable goals bring something more to the table.
Well Said.
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Fabrice Dubois
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Thank you for highlighting this game. I hadn't hear about it before and i am eager to try it because of the blend of mechanics you mention : the spatial element is obviously the most appealing one.

It's seem to be a pretty thematic game : this is a big "pro" for me. I played Ginkgopolis once (3 players on a prototype version) and it was very dry to me.

It seems to be player interaction, indirect from what i understand. This is not an issue for me : i own and like Glen More but the goals could add a level of interaction and decision.

Two "cons" :
- language dependence : will a french version be available soon ? Asmodee is listed on publishers so perhaps there is hope.
- final artwork : when this will be available to be seen ?
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Jesse Dean
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Argorius wrote:
Jesse - will you come out with an updated Essen-interest-list before the convention starts?

More rules came out since your last update and I would be pretty interested what your current thoughts are based on the current information.


My list is astonishingly short this year:
Archipelago
Clash of Cultures
CO2
Great Zimbabwe
Keyflower
Tzolk’in: The Mayan Calendar
Terra Mystica
Western Town

(already reviewed)
Ground Floor
Suburbia

These are the games that I will be acquiring (through review copes or purchases) and reviewing. I will probably play a few more outside of this list, particularly at BGG.Con, but these are the ones I plan to focus on the most.

Is there anything not on this list that I you think might be missing out on?
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Fabrice Dubois
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Nice list.

What about Myrmes ?
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Jesse Dean
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What about it? What do you think makes it exceptional and interesting? The play time (75 minutes) is sufficient to make me skeptical due to my standard distaste towards more middle weight euros, and Ystari has only made one game that I love (Caylus).
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doubtofbuddha wrote:
These are the games that I will be acquiring (through review copes or purchases) and reviewing. I will probably play a few more outside of this list, particularly at BGG.Con, but these are the ones I plan to focus on the most.

Is there anything not on this list that I you think might be missing out on?


You play 2p-only's occasionally, right? I suspect Polis: Fight for the Hegemony is definitely worth some attention [despite being a 2010 PnP release, its real release was this year and US availability is expected sometime in the next few months].
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Jesse Dean
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I think that was on my radar last year. I will definitely put it on my list to try out at BGG.Con.
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doubtofbuddha wrote:
My list is astonishingly thankfully short this year:

This is how I feel about my shorter list.
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doubtofbuddha wrote:
Argorius wrote:
Jesse - will you come out with an updated Essen-interest-list before the convention starts?

More rules came out since your last update and I would be pretty interested what your current thoughts are based on the current information.


My list is astonishingly short this year:
Archipelago
Clash of Cultures
CO2
Great Zimbabwe
Keyflower
Tzolk’in: The Mayan Calendar
Terra Mystica
Western Town

(already reviewed)
Ground Floor
Suburbia

These are the games that I will be acquiring (through review copes or purchases) and reviewing. I will probably play a few more outside of this list, particularly at BGG.Con, but these are the ones I plan to focus on the most.

Is there anything not on this list that I you think might be missing out on?


I remember that you mentioned that you has already signed up to get Western Town anyway but what about it is attractive to you?

Also, on an initial list you put down Dominare? Did you lose interest in it after reading the rules?

I am also wondering what you think about Shafausa?

(Sort of curious what your thoughts are on Yedo even though it isnt on my short list)
 
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-matt s.
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Really great summary of the gameplay. I just played a 4P game and a 2P game this past weekend. I enjoyed it quite a bit and I really liked the interactions between the different buildings.

The only thing I had a concern with was the end-game goals - sometimes what you received as secret goals to choose from were total opposite of the 'open' goals on the table that everyone was directly competing for and seemed perhaps a bit unfair as a result, particularly in a 2P game.

You seemed to be ok with the goals overall and, I agree with your assessment regarding how they change the dynamics of the game. However, did you see/feel any imbalance (perceived or actual) in the goals during your plays?

Note that your summary seems to imply that you have 2 personal goals in the game, but the rules we played with state you draw 2 at the beginning and discard 1 after seeing the shared goals...not sure if your demo version had a different rule there.

I was thinking it might be interesting to draw 3 goals at the beginning and hold all your secret goals at first and then eliminate one as each of the A and B stacks was depleted until you have 1 left, thus if you have abandoned one of the shared competing goals you can go for your own personal opposing goal instead.

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doubtofbuddha wrote:
Argorius wrote:
Jesse - will you come out with an updated Essen-interest-list before the convention starts?

More rules came out since your last update and I would be pretty interested what your current thoughts are based on the current information.


My list is astonishingly short this year:
Archipelago
Clash of Cultures
CO2
Great Zimbabwe
Keyflower
Tzolk’in: The Mayan Calendar
Terra Mystica
Western Town

(already reviewed)
Ground Floor
Suburbia

These are the games that I will be acquiring (through review copes or purchases) and reviewing. I will probably play a few more outside of this list, particularly at BGG.Con, but these are the ones I plan to focus on the most.

Is there anything not on this list that I you think might be missing out on?


The one game you didn't mention that I thought you might have been interested in is Colonies... economic, "tech" trees, 3 - 5 players, lots of potential interaction and a 150 minute play time. Right now, it's expensive and has a limited print run so I decided to pass... hopefully I won't regret that decision later.
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Jesse Dean
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Thanks Jimmy! I had not even heard of that one.
 
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Jerry Hagen
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Did you play this with 2, Jesse? If so, would you recommend it for that player count?
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Jesse Dean
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I played it across all player counts. I actually thought it was one of the better euros with 2. I tend to prefer games specifically designed for 2 when playing with 2, but I thought this one worked well.
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is it fiddly?
is it multiplayer solitaire, besides the multiplayer bidding/drafting
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Mathue Faulkner
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runescience wrote:
is it fiddly?
is it multiplayer solitaire, besides the multiplayer bidding/drafting

For the 2nd question, some of the building bonuses depend on what your opponents are building. I would wager it's still low on the interaction scale, but not complete multiplayer solitaire...
 
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joel siragher
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i noted a solitaire play option? one player. I might try it.
 
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