Michael Redston
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Intrigue: 500 cards
Dark Ages: 500 cards
Prosperity: 300 cards+boards+tokens
Seaside: 300 cards+boards+tokens
Hinterlands: 300 cards

That being said, I would still purchase Hinterlands over Intrigue for the simple fact that I own the base games, so the extra base cards mean nothing to me (I never play with more than 2 players). I also own Prosperity, so I'm getting Dark Ages, then Seaside, Hinterlands, Intrigue and Cornucopia (not sure about Alchemy).

But that was off-topic. Back to the subject: Why do you think Hinterlands doesn't have more cards to compensate for the lack of boards/tokens? After all, all big box expansions cost the same. Well, apparently Hinterlands costs $5 less.
 
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Derek Thompson
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kroen wrote:


But that was off-topic. Back to the subject: Why do you think Hinterlands doesn't have more cards to compensate for the lack of boards/tokens? After all, all big box expansions cost the same.


This is wrong. They all have $45 MSRP, EXCEPT Hinterlands, which is $40.
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Michael Redston
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aldaryn wrote:
This is wrong. They all have $45 MSRP, EXCEPT Hinterlands, which is $40.

Wow, didn't know that. I take back everything I said.
Still getting it next to last though.
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aldaryn wrote:
kroen wrote:


But that was off-topic. Back to the subject: Why do you think Hinterlands doesn't have more cards to compensate for the lack of boards/tokens? After all, all big box expansions cost the same.


This is wrong. They all have $45 MSRP, EXCEPT Hinterlands, which is $40.

The number of cards are also all wrong. Seaside and Hinterlands both have 300 cards. Not 262 or 266. If you are counting all of the randomizer cards and blanks for the Base Set, Intrigue, and Prosperity, you must also do the same for Seaside and Hinterlands.
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Beaveman wrote:
aldaryn wrote:
kroen wrote:


But that was off-topic. Back to the subject: Why do you think Hinterlands doesn't have more cards to compensate for the lack of boards/tokens? After all, all big box expansions cost the same.


This is wrong. They all have $45 MSRP, EXCEPT Hinterlands, which is $40.

The number of cards are also all wrong. Seaside and Hinterlands both have 300 cards. Not 262 or 266. If you are counting all of the randomizer cards and blanks for the Base Set, Intrigue, and Prosperity, you must also do the same for Seaside and Hinterlands.

I didn't count them, I looked at the pdf rulebooks and this is what they said. THEY probably didn't count them. I'll edit.
 
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Robin Brown
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Also, don't just go by number of cards per dollar.

Hinterlands is really fun.

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malletman wrote:
Also, don't just go by number of cards per dollar.

Hinterlands is really fun.


I believe you. I just think Dark Ages and Seaside are funner.
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kroen wrote:
Intrigue: 500 cards
Dark Ages: 500 cards
Prosperity: 300 cards+boards+tokens
Seaside: 300 cards+boards+tokens
Hinterlands: 300 cards


Intrigue's makeup is really about 250 cards or so or less. Sure, they're essential, but I don't count the foundation cards in this case... just Kingdom cards, as folks hardly play in single games more than 4p
 
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Mike Watne
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Actually, I might suggest a slightly alternate order for your collecting:

1) Seaside: Arguably the best expansion, and certainly my favorite. In terms of the variety you can add to your games without integrating a whole series of convoluted and potentially jarring rules to your games, this one wins. It is very much an accessible Dominion experience and a good next step.

2) Intrigue: I know you aren't too hip on this one due to the extra base cards, but consider that this is also very much a solid expansion in its own right. It also introduces a series of concepts, like hybrid cards and variable actions, that integrate very nicely with the core set without a lot of added complexity. This will help you preserve the classic feel of the game longer, and more smoothly mix in the more complicated later expansions down the road.

In fact, in my group, we frequently limit our Dominion nights to cards from only Core/Intrigue/Seaside, as we tend to have the most fun.

I'd slot in Prosperity next, but since you already have it...

3) Hinterlands: This set introduces some very interesting cards that really start to shake up the way Dominion can be played. There are some very fun and rewarding combinations utilizing this set, and it can be used to really blend the other sets together into a cohesive unit, as the abilities of Hinterlands cards tend to pair well with each of the previous sets.

4) Dark Ages: This is a fantastic set, but it is also a pretty distinct departure from traditional Dominion. If you're looking for a great way to spice up a game you've played hundreds of times, then the new concepts and abilities introduced here will go a long way. That said, it is likely a poor choice for an early expansion, especially if your long-term goal is to gather a larger collection. Granted, it will immediately add a ton to your set now, but I believe you'll get more out of it if you save it until later.

5) Cornucopia: A fun little set that adds a couple of great cards. The "differently named" bonanza is a nice addition to the Dominion universe, but one that can wait a while. This set is absolutely worth owning, but not a priority.

6) Alchemy: A fun set in theory. In practice, it is very circumstantial. The secondary economy introduced with the potions works well if there is a good assortment of Alchemy cards. However, there aren't many Alchemy cards. You need to take pains to build games that synergize with these cards, as fully randomized games including several sets tend to make these cards stinkers. That said, such carefully constructed games are a blast, and you'll be able to do things with Alchemy cards that no other set can touch. A safe bet to skip this set, but a solid purchase too. Save it for last.

Just something to consider. Sticking to your plan will also work nicely. Anything that keeps the Dominion flowing is good times.
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If you're including Alchemy in a randomizer, I suggest ensuring 2 to 3 Alchemy cards that cost potion make it in. Games with just one don't usually make enough impact with potions, and more than that can dilute the whole mess.
 
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Michael Redston
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Thanks for the suggestions, Mike. I've replied to each in bold letters.
thegreybetween wrote:
Actually, I might suggest a slightly alternate order for your collecting:

1) Seaside: Arguably the best expansion, and certainly my favorite. In terms of the variety you can add to your games without integrating a whole series of convoluted and potentially jarring rules to your games, this one wins. It is very much an accessible Dominion experience and a good next step.
Exactly why it's right after Dark Ages, which is my next expansion. Why? read on.

2) Intrigue: I know you aren't too hip on this one due to the extra base cards, but consider that this is also very much a solid expansion in its own right. It also introduces a series of concepts, like hybrid cards and variable actions, that integrate very nicely with the core set without a lot of added complexity. This will help you preserve the classic feel of the game longer, and more smoothly mix in the more complicated later expansions down the road.
A reasonable suggestion that makes sense, but you see, my dominion "group", which consists of me and my brother, are gamers, and it didn't take long for the simplicity of the core game to bore us out of our minds (a bit less than 100 games). I've seen the Intrigue cards, and while they seem pretty fun to play with, they're a bit too simple for our taste and don't depart much from the core game. Don't get me wrong the cards seem interesting and we do plan on buying it, although it would be the last big box we buy.

In fact, in my group, we frequently limit our Dominion nights to cards from only Core/Intrigue/Seaside, as we tend to have the most fun.

I'd slot in Prosperity next, but since you already have it...
We got Prospeirty first mainly because it adds base cards (Colony and Platinum) so it's a good starting purchase as these cards would be present in all games (I don't care for the rules' suggestion on when to use these). And it goes without mentioning that the kingdom cards themselves are pretty great and powerful.

3) Hinterlands: This set introduces some very interesting cards that really start to shake up the way Dominion can be played. There are some very fun and rewarding combinations utilizing this set, and it can be used to really blend the other sets together into a cohesive unit, as the abilities of Hinterlands cards tend to pair well with each of the previous sets.
The cards do seem fun, and it's an interesting contrast to Dark Ages; one has effects when you gain them, the other when you trash them. That one goes after Seaside.

4) Dark Ages: This is a fantastic set, but it is also a pretty distinct departure from traditional Dominion. If you're looking for a great way to spice up a game you've played hundreds of times, then the new concepts and abilities introduced here will go a long way. That said, it is likely a poor choice for an early expansion, especially if your long-term goal is to gather a larger collection. Granted, it will immediately add a ton to your set now, but I believe you'll get more out of it if you save it until later.
Now I've already mentioned we're gamers, I've already mentioned I like a lot of cards and base cards (in this case shelters), but that's only part of why it's my next expansion. I've looked through all the cards (as I did with all of the expansions) and I've simply fell in love with them. I also find them very elegant, and I realize not many people would say this about Dark Ages, but to me they simply click. I've also played with some of them in the goko online version, and my suspicion was right: They're simply awesome. I would have gotten it even before Prosperity but I couldn't sway my brother. Still, he got to choose the first expansion, so I got to choose the second. From the third onward we're in an agreement.

5) Cornucopia: A fun little set that adds a couple of great cards. The "differently named" bonanza is a nice addition to the Dominion universe, but one that can wait a while. This set is absolutely worth owning, but not a priority.
It does seem like the better small expansion, though I think Guilds will be better (and I base that thought on absolutely nothing, just a hunch).

6) Alchemy: A fun set in theory. In practice, it is very circumstantial. The secondary economy introduced with the potions works well if there is a good assortment of Alchemy cards. However, there aren't many Alchemy cards. You need to take pains to build games that synergize with these cards, as fully randomized games including several sets tend to make these cards stinkers. That said, such carefully constructed games are a blast, and you'll be able to do things with Alchemy cards that no other set can touch. A safe bet to skip this set, but a solid purchase too. Save it for last.
I still don't know if I want an extra currency... I will probably get it eventually though, but it would be a long time before I do so... I will save if for when the rest of the expansions would start to become dull (which might take years).

Just something to consider. Sticking to your plan will also work nicely. Anything that keeps the Dominion flowing is good times.
 
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ackmondual wrote:
If you're including Alchemy in a randomizer, I suggest ensuring 2 to 3 Alchemy cards that cost potion make it in. Games with just one don't usually make enough impact with potions, and more than that can dilute the whole mess.

I actually disagree - somewhat - with this recommendation. I find that if there are multiple Potion cost cards, especially 3 or more, buying a Potion is a foregone conclusion unless there's something else really powerful in the other cards. With only 1, it is a much more interesting decision based on what else is out there. 2 is also a good number to keep the decision on the "interesting" side.

I also haven't run tons of simulations or anything though so there's probably data that says it's never worth buying Potion if there's only 1 Potion card or something.
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Luce wrote:
ackmondual wrote:
If you're including Alchemy in a randomizer, I suggest ensuring 2 to 3 Alchemy cards that cost potion make it in. Games with just one don't usually make enough impact with potions, and more than that can dilute the whole mess.

I actually disagree - somewhat - with this recommendation. I find that if there are multiple Potion cost cards, especially 3 or more, buying a Potion is a foregone conclusion unless there's something else really powerful in the other cards. With only 1, it is a much more interesting decision based on what else is out there. 2 is also a good number to keep the decision on the "interesting" side.

I also haven't run tons of simulations or anything though so there's probably data that says it's never worth buying Potion if there's only 1 Potion card or something.


If the one potion card is Scrying Pool or Alchemist or University, it's probably worth buying regardless.
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^Familiar as well
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Please, please stop making threads. I'm begging you.
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LastFootnote wrote:
Please, please stop making threads. I'm begging you.

No one's forcing you to read them, troll.
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I don't use the potion recommendation. But I believe that Golem is worth getting a potion even it is the only Kingdom card with a potion cost.
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kroen wrote:
Wow, didn't know that. I take back everything I said.


EVERYTHING? whistle
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kroen wrote:
Intrigue: 500 cards
Dark Ages: 500 cards
Prosperity: 300 cards+boards+tokens
Seaside: 300 cards+boards+tokens
Hinterlands: 300 cards

But that was off-topic. Back to the subject: Why do you think Hinterlands doesn't have more cards to compensate for the lack of boards/tokens? After all, all big box expansions cost the same. Well, apparently Hinterlands costs $5 less.


I personally find the mats quite gimmicky for Seaside / Prosperity.

You probably don't need mats for Native Village or Island, and unless you combine Pirate Ship with Guilds cards there you won't need the mat as well. Even with Guilds it's not that hard to keep track of two different kinds of tokens.

The victory tokens mat is even more useless - you can simply keep your VPs in front of you without use of a mat.

Heck, I'm even considering getting rid of the mats to make Dominion easier to store.

Also, I'd ignore MSRP for the discussion, as it doesn't have any relation with reality.
 
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Luce wrote:
ackmondual wrote:
If you're including Alchemy in a randomizer, I suggest ensuring 2 to 3 Alchemy cards that cost potion make it in. Games with just one don't usually make enough impact with potions, and more than that can dilute the whole mess.

I actually disagree - somewhat - with this recommendation. I find that if there are multiple Potion cost cards, especially 3 or more, buying a Potion is a foregone conclusion unless there's something else really powerful in the other cards. With only 1, it is a much more interesting decision based on what else is out there. 2 is also a good number to keep the decision on the "interesting" side.

I also haven't run tons of simulations or anything though so there's probably data that says it's never worth buying Potion if there's only 1 Potion card or something.


Well, unless if my mistaken, I would've had to have included the words "at least" to have more than 3 Potion cards as part of the setup. AFAIK, "ensuring 2 to 3 Alchemy cards" means exactly 2 or exactly 3. We've tried setups that include only cards from Alchemy, and while it was fun, we won't be doing that again.



Merudo wrote:
kroen wrote:
Intrigue: 500 cards
Dark Ages: 500 cards
Prosperity: 300 cards+boards+tokens
Seaside: 300 cards+boards+tokens
Hinterlands: 300 cards

But that was off-topic. Back to the subject: Why do you think Hinterlands doesn't have more cards to compensate for the lack of boards/tokens? After all, all big box expansions cost the same. Well, apparently Hinterlands costs $5 less.


I personally find the mats quite gimmicky for Seaside / Prosperity.

You probably don't need mats for Native Village or Island, and unless you combine Pirate Ship with Guilds cards there you won't need the mat as well. Even with Guilds it's not that hard to keep track of two different kinds of tokens.

The victory tokens mat is even more useless - you can simply keep your VPs in front of you without use of a mat.

With a good system and paying attention, they're as unnecessary as the randomizers, and even rules that your discard has to be face up for fear of confusing your discard and draw piles. Also nice when you don't have much table space, as you may end up grabbing someone else's deck.

Otherwise, you can tell by context... Native Village cards are face down, Island are face up, and the tokens are only what they are. However, it is convenient to look at a glance and see what people have in their Native Village, rather than having to ask them.

Merudo wrote:
Heck, I'm even considering getting rid of the mats to make Dominion easier to store.
I haven't seen anybody do this, only because they already need a big enough box for 4 to 8 sets worth of cards that they got space anyways. I've gotten rid of rulebooks, inserts, and even whole boxes to better fit my games.

Merudo wrote:
Also, I'd ignore MSRP for the discussion, as it doesn't have any relation with reality.
Some folks still buy these games at a FLGS though, where MRSP (+tax) is what they do pay.
 
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