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Subject: Variable movement costs for terrain rss

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Barry Harvey
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We've all done it. That perfect move. Passed through various bits of terrain and ended up with just enough movement points left to turn and attack an enemy from the flank. But how realistic is that?

We don't have movement allocations in real life. There are battles where forces arrived too late because they got stuck passing through a wood or crossing a swamp, something that seldom happens in wargames. Forces are unlikely to be caught out in the open because they know exactly how long it will take to cross an open area and exactly how far an enemy unit has to move to engage them.

I know that speed of play is a good argument against any form of random movement costs but are there any games that use it? Off the top of my head I can only think of 40K which requires a die roll to see how far through rough terrain a unit can move.

Just to clarify, I mean random or variable movement costs in relation to terrain rather than random Movement Allocation.
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K G
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I can only think of games where random weather might impact on terrain movement costs.
 
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Lance Runolfsson
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In De Bellis Multitudinisthere are die rolls to determine how hard a river or stream will be to cross.
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Steve Willows
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A fair point I suppose.

But then, on the other hand this could be seen as simply knowing the limits and capabilities of those under your command.

Perhaps a cool mechanic might be that the lower the experience of the commander, the worse his ability to predict what they could do. I suppose that might be simulated in various ways, including a random element that would impede ones ability to exactly plot moves, as mentioned above. But also, perhaps, by activation chit pull mechanics which generally serve to defeat "plans" if you will.

We'll never get it exactly right.
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Bob Roberts

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Not uncommon in miniatures rules, can't think of any examples off the top of my head from boardgames though I imagine it has been done.

I use it a lot in the skirmish stuff I play, roll a d6 and take that off your movement sort of thing. But then I am a fan of the design for effect school
 
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Lee Kennedy
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ASL has a couple of examples.

Your tanks can bog in rough terrain (woods, rubble, building, etc) so you don't know whether you'll actually get where you think.

Also for wire your infantry has to roll to see how many movement points it costs to get underneath. If you roll higher than the points remaining then they are hung up on the wire and have to try again next turn. Since you only have 4 points you can easily get hung up for several turns.
 
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Cpl. Fields
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In the Great Campaigns of the American Civil War, movement rates are largely determined by die roll, so you're never sure if your army will march as far you want it to. It can be very frustrating, but it's pretty realistic.
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Rev. Mark Fischer
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ASL uses a player phase by player phase weather Die roll that could bring some degree of change to the moment and every scenario, campaign is set in a particular seasonal and current weather conditions all of which have an effect upon each turn.
 
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jumbit
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This would interfere with the godlike control that wargamers like to have over their units. Just listen to the moans and gnashing of teeth when the game makes things dependent on die rolls or (worse) a hand of cards.
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David Janik-Jones
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It doesn't use "random or variable movement costs in relation to terrain" but Up Front comes closest to capturing some form of variability in movement.

You play that move card in your hand to get group A going towards the -3 building you hold and intend to play next turn, until you opponent tosses a stream, marsh, wire card down, or simply brush to stop you from getting someplace better.

Or you toss out that move card hoping you'll draw some decent terrain and have that BAR over there open up on your group and it just goes downhill from there.
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David Kershaw
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badinfo wrote:
Not uncommon in miniatures rules, can't think of any examples off the top of my head from boardgames though I imagine it has been done.

I use it a lot in the skirmish stuff I play, roll a d6 and take that off your movement sort of thing. But then I am a fan of the design for effect school

Principles of War: 19th Century
 
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Bob Roberts

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kerpob2 wrote:
[q="badinfo"]Not uncommon in miniatures rules, can't think of any examples off the top of my head from boardgames though I imagine it has been done.

I use it a lot in the skirmish stuff I play, roll a d6 and take that off your movement sort of thing. But then I am a fan of the design for effect school


Yeah, and a fair few other miniatures rules, like Rapid Fire and some others I can't put a name to right now. But boardgames not so much.

I always liked the way The Complete Brigadier did it, terrain didn't slow you down so much as cause disorder. You physically disordered the unit and disordered it a little more each turn until it stopped to reform. The disorder affected your shooting, and you were pretty much a dead duck if charged. At least IIRC, it's been a couple decades lol.
 
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