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Necromunda» Forums » General

Subject: Basic questions rss

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Rex Populi
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I'm a big fan of 40K, but I've been looking for a scaled-down, skirmish game for some time now(I considered Infinity/Mercs, but I don't like the fluff nor can I find someone to play with...fluff, btw, is very important to me)

So my questions at this point are: How similar are the mechanics of the game to 40K? Is it pure infantry or are there vehicles, etc.? Are the models currently available only in pewter or plastic?

...oh, and if someone would be kind enough to give me an overview of the factions, it would be much appreciated.

Thanks all
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Derek Anderson
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Ennis
Montana
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There is nothing better than playing board games with my 4 sons!
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There is nothing better than playing board games with my 4 sons!
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Hi Rex,

Welcome to the club! Necromunda was one of the best games I have ever played, but it strongly depends on your group and their willingness to take part in a long campaign. Our campaign was 2 years long, once a week, and had about 12 players, maybe 8 or so of those players were regulars and the others came and went over time.

Anyhow, to answer your questions... Necromunda is very heavy into modifying your minis to match their profiles. Minis will change weapons over time for example. As far as I know, Games Workshop only offers metal minis currently, but it isn't necessary to use "Necromunda" minis so long as they look the part. I used the Catachan Jungle Fighters for my Orlock gang... another player used the Imperial Guard troop minis for Van Saar and they came out awesome looking.

The game plays much like Warhammer 40k Second Edition at a skirmish level. It is pure minis, but I do believe there were some rules released for vehicles. I can't be 100% positive because we never used any in our campaign, but there several articles in magazines and Necromunda even had a magazine of it's own.

You can download a lot of rules (and the rule book) from the Games Workshop website for free.

You may also want to check out some other similar skirmish games that are currently available, here is a link to a nice geeklist for you, feel free to ask questions on it, there are some good guys there take take an active part in it.

Currently Available Non-Prepainted Miniature Skirmish Games (A Cardboard Carnage Geeklist)
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Luke Stirling
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Trondheim
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The rules of Necromunda are very heavily based of Second Edition 40K. I have no idea how the 40K rules have changed since then, so I don't have any basis for comparison with regard to the current 40K ruleset.

The only things that have changed in the Necromunda rules over time are modifications to account for the unavailability of certain components (i.e. sustained fire dice and hand flamer templates are not required for the revised rules, but are in the original game).
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Mark
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Before Necromunda, there was Confrontation, a game published in a series of White Dwarf articles. Its stated goal was to delve in depth in one aspect of the 40K Universe: the Underhive of one spire on the planet Necromunda. Confrontation laid the background framework of Necromunda: the setting, gangs, individual profiles (vice squads), an advancement campaign, etc. It used 40K weapons and equipment. But, it used a much more complex combat system.

Necromunda came along simultaneous with 40K V2. Necro's basic movement and combat system is the same as 40K V2. The major differences are gangers instead of aliens and Space Marines, focus on individuals instead of squads, gangs (8-12 models) instead of armies (20-100 models and vehicles), individual advancements and lasting injuries, and a campaign framework. In Necro, each game affects the "history" of a gang and its individual members.

Confined to the Underhive of a massive, urbanized, industrial spire there are no vehicles, or flyers, or monstrous creatures in the main rules. These are added later by a plethora of fan-written rules.

Necromunda and 40K V2 differ from 40K V3 and later 40K versions in that 40K V3 changed from a squad game, to an army game; more squads, more vehicles, more figures. Movement, and a few other functions were simplified, lot's of detail was truncated or eliminated, and for the first time, rational vehicle rules were instituted. In simple terms, a "modern" 40K game is twice the size of an old, typical V2 game. A V2 game the size of a typical modern game would take all day to play. Necromunda games are even smaller.

The campaign takes precedence in Necromunda. Games are fast and fun. But, the post-game bookkeeping decides the success or failure of a gang. My 10 year=old son complains it takes longer to complete injuries, income, advancements, and buying new equipment than the game itself. Individual gangers develop unique profiles of stats and skills. A gang can become very good, or really lousy. The background is very in depth and atmospheric.

As equipment is bought and sold, and injuries are incurred, there is a requirement to perform a lot of converting of models. IF following the intent of the rules and IF playing strictly WYSIWYG. I don't, I'm not going to convert models I lovingly painted 15 years ago. I have enough to substitute for most weapon combinations. Or, I ignore some WYSIWIG entirely. But, a converter would find much to like here. Original miniatures are still around (I just scored an original Escher box set for its original price). Or, GW plastic models and other companies' figs will work. Terrain is what you make of it, original or substitutes). You just need lot's of terrain. And, remember, its the campaign that is the heart of the game, not the specific minis or equipment or terrain.
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