Recommend
 
 Thumb up
 Hide
9 Posts

Axis & Allies Europe 1940» Forums » Rules

Subject: Aerial Ramming Attacks rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Justin Royek
United States
Cochranton
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
I have decided to introduce a new rule for the Soviet player called a "taran" attack.

The "taran" was a ramming maneuver performed by Soviet pilots against German planes because the Soviet pilot needed a way to destroy the enemy plane when the ammunition was out or wasn't effective enough to bring down the enemy plane it was shooting at.

The "taran" Russian word for a battering ram, like a ram ramming the gates of the castle, was an aerial maneuver that involves slicing the tail section or wing with the propellor of the ramming Soviet fighter. Like a saw going through wood. The propellor would serve as a saw, cutting the airplane in two. The taran was an effective maneuver that created a sense of psychological terror when used against the Germans. It was effective. Many Soviet pilots were awarded medals just for performing one, but the attacks were later discouraged because better training and better airplanes often negated the use of such attacks.

Unlike a kamikaze attack, the taran was not meant to be a suicide attack where the pilot is killed and is a deliberate suicide attack to die for the Emperor. Most Soviet pilots usually survive them and it was meant to be an attack where the propellor saws off the enemy aircraft, usually a bomber or something like that, where the Soviet pilot lives to fight another day. The taran attacker had no intention of wanting to die like a kamikaze would. It was an effective tactic, but an extremely desperate one at that and usually last resort if all else failed. It was not a suicide attack by any means. At least not in the sense of a kamikaze attack.

The rule I want to introduce is a taran attack, with a token like a kamikaze token, only this time the Russian taran attack token has an inscription in Cyrillic Russian, the word "Taran" in Cyrillic. It works like this.

Before land combat in any Russian territory where the enemy has air units, a taran token is laid down by the player representing the USSR that says "Taran" in Cyrillic letters on it. An enemy air unit is selected to be attacked by the Soviet player. The token is laid down, and the die roll for performing a "Taran" is a "2" or less (just like the Japanese kamikaze token.) If the Soviet player rolls a "2" or less, the enemy Axis air unit is destroyed and removed from play. If the attack is unsuccesful, the Soviet player can perform more of them. The Soviet player may perform as many "Taran" attacks as they like. There are 6 tokens. I have modeled them after the Kamikaze tokens used by Japan. (like the Pacific 1940 token does with "Kamikaze" in Japanese Kanji alphabet.) No air units are required to perform a "Taran" attack, just like for the kamikaze token. Yes, I know the taran and kamikaze are not the same, but in order for the taran to be effective, it has to be fluid and dynamic to properly utilized and implemented in the game.

The Germans also used ramming attacks, WHICH THEY in turn learned from the Soviets and they used them against the Allied bomber formations. Except the German tactics, weren't so successful and they were losing the war at that point, and they lacked the effectivness that the Soviets had. Theirs were called "Rammjager" I will also create a "Rammjager" I don't know, but the German tactics did not have the same results as the Soviet ones did. I shall put this into Global 1939 game or Axis & Allies Europe 1940 if war is declared against the USSR by Germany or any Axis country.

Hope you guys like it.
Justin.
I was inspired because I felt that we needed to have a new dynamic to the game to make a new attack that was a special Russian attack called the "Taran" that was actually used by the Soviets and important, or of importance to them, and was somewhat effective and worked, and decided to introduce it to make, hopefully the game more effective and depict the Russian Front correctly to actually use the "taran" attack to better represent the Soviet forces in the game to make it more accurate.
Well, you know.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jan Ozimek
Denmark
Aalborg
flag msg tools
badge
Must resist M:tG. Boardgames are my methadone :)
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm sorry, but I think it is a bit silly, and I seriously doubt it had any significant impact on the outcome of the war. Are you trolling here?

Anyway, as I have probably mentioned before I'm not too fund of adding "homebrewn chrome" in general, but if you really wan't to mess around with some Russian special ability, I think some kind of Russian Winter effect would make more sense; both thematically and game play wise.

Give the Russian 1-3 Harsh Winter tokens. The rule could go like this:
During the German purchase units phase the Russian player can expend a Harsh Winter token to prevent all German ground forces in original Russian territories from moving East. (If "east" proves too difficult to define, perhaps just prevent them from moving, OR require that any move they make must take them closer to the Berlin territory.)

Some kind of attrition could also be triggered. Say a 1/6 chance to die for all infantry units in those territories. (Panzer, Mech.inf and Artillery were probably better supplied.)
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
jumbit
China
Zhejiang
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Inappropriate for a grand strategic game. You're talking about individual airplanes, while the air units in Axis and Allies are at the Wing level or above.
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bret Hawkeye
Germany
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb
jumbit wrote:
Inappropriate for a grand strategic game. You're talking about individual airplanes, while the air units in Axis and Allies are at the Wing level or above.


Then why are so few people consider the "low luck" mechanism as unnecessary? Isnt luck about individual events/units having a large impact on a bigger conflict?

@Ozimek
About that "russian winter" rule - i like it. What would you give Germany in return?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Justin Royek
United States
Cochranton
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
ozimek wrote:
I'm sorry, but I think it is a bit silly, and I seriously doubt it had any significant impact on the outcome of the war. Are you trolling here?

Anyway, as I have probably mentioned before I'm not too fund of adding "homebrewn chrome" in general, but if you really wan't to mess around with some Russian special ability, I think some kind of Russian Winter effect would make more sense; both thematically and game play wise.

Give the Russian 1-3 Harsh Winter tokens. The rule could go like this:
During the German purchase units phase the Russian player can expend a Harsh Winter token to prevent all German ground forces in original Russian territories from moving East. (If "east" proves too difficult to define, perhaps just prevent them from moving, OR require that any move they make must take them closer to the Berlin territory.)

Some kind of attrition could also be triggered. Say a 1/6 chance to die for all infantry units in those territories. (Panzer, Mech.inf and Artillery were probably better supplied.)


I don't think I'm trolling here. The kamikaze attacks were attacks that were supposed to have changed the outcome of the war, yet really didn't in the long run. But they are represented here in the game by the Japanese player. You do not need an air unit to carry out a "taran" attack against an Axis air unit. All you need is a token that you lay down and roll the dice and "2" or less destroys an enemy air unit.
I didn't have any real impact no, but at it LEAST GAVE THE PILOT a chance to psychologically fulfill a desire to destroy the enemy.

Taran attacks were psychologically terrifying to the Germans, in the way kamikaze attacks were to the Allies. They didn't really alter the income of the war,no, but AT LEAST they gave an advantage lacking elsewhere. The pilot could use his plane's propeller to shear the control surfaces of a bomber, thus brining it down.

Oh and are KAMIKAZE ATTACKS a silly rule for the Japanese player? They didn't affect the outcome, too much either, yet AAP40 has them in game for use by the Japanese player as a real weapon that the Japanese had in real life. The Pacific 40 game would be incomplete without it. The kamikaze was more a psychological weapon that gave the Japanese a psychological advantage of fulfilling their need to die for the Emperor,
The Taran attack does the same for the Soviet Union. Except this time, it's the Rodina (Motherland) they're fighting and dying for in this instance. Having a taran for the Soviet player is like having kamikaze for the Japanese. I just can't imagine Eastern Front without it.

http://www.wingsofwar.org/forums/showthread.php?9863-Rules-f...

According to this site, the Germans lost 635 aircraft due to "Taran" attacks. So you tell me if it wasn't effective? It was, when used effectively. It had an impact, but not really enough of one to change the outcome of the war.

http://www.rand.org/pubs/papers/2008/P7192.pdf
More info on "Taran" attacks.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ron Glass
United States
Tampa
Florida
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
The Taran concept and effort is out of scale for this game. I'm not even sure it would be in scale for either Russian Campaign 4th edition or Russia Beseiged, both being slightly more tactical (down to the oprerational level).

Ron
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ron Glass
United States
Tampa
Florida
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Jan, I like the concept but not sure it would work without creating an overall "weather" optional rule.

You'd get into Pacific Typhoon season; Europe had some major winters too; North Africa was always dusty and usually hot; all of the Pacific land battles were wet and steamy and rather "jungle-y", etc

And if was cold enough for Germany to be affected, then the Russians would not get any Lend -Lease, which historically they couldn't, but its another component not represented in the game.

However, I do see that the long Russian winter might be easier to depict than the occasional summer storms from typhoons, hurricanes, african summer dust storms, etc, all which were much shorter in duration, though equally as debilitating.

Side note is that the mech and tanks were more movement affected during fall/spring by the mud, and while the winter froze the troops it also made machines very hard to use (all mech and air, etc), so maybe the easiest is every other turn all units in Russia are minus 1 movement, to a minimum of 1, for EVERYBODY, and simply call it good.

More details needed on units moving into or out of Russia, which ought to be affected too, making it so some units couldn't get in as they'd lose the movement point the moment they enter, so would not have the enough to complete the move, etc, etc.

Be careful how far into ETO, or 3rd Reich, or many others, that you go.

Ron
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
patrick pena

houston
Texas
msg tools
AA revised edition has 6 different "National Advantages" for each power unique to each one, also explaining the historic reason behind each one. One example is "Russian Winter", Russia's greatest ally was its winter cold. Germany's invasion stopped dead as the snows came down. Once during the game in your collect income phase, you can declare a severe winter. Until the start of your next turn, your infantry defend on a 3. There are more but they would take some time to type.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dave Young
United States
Anacortes
Washington
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb
flaco1971 wrote:
AA revised edition has 6 different "National Advantages" for each power unique to each one, also explaining the historic reason behind each one.


Are you referring to A&A Global 1940? I haven't seen anything on "National Advantages", but it sounds like an interesting concept.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.