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Subject: reserves rss

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Johan Pettersson
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The reserves cards are like jokers.
They can be "transformed" into any suit and number.

I can see the point of using them as any colorur, but what is the point of having them get an unspecified number?

I undestand that you can ude the reserves as either en ace, making a tremedous victory, or just putting them to a number for making the battle equal. But what's the point of just making it equal and not making a victory?

Am I missing some subtle point. (Or have I misunderstood the rules?)

best regards

Johan P
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richard sivel
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your understanding of the rules is correct.

Making the battle equal is not a good idea, though, because then your opponent may play a card again ...

A good idea is to use the reserve with a value so that you receive a -1, at the moment you run out of cards so that your belief in winning the battle is gone ...
On a -1, you can say retreat, and you will lose the battle with minimum losses.

Of course, if you have a normal suit card which fits for a cheap loss (-1 or -2) you would not use the reserve.

Be careful though, clever players will look for battle grounds, where a -1 retreat will set up for a counterattack possibility which will encircle you ... Then your army will be doomed ... Unless you were even more clever, because you made a bluff: Used a reserve, say -1, but still have a lot of cards, then he is doomed ... ahh ... now i am beginning to talk ...
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Johan Pettersson
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Ah, now I see. You can choose if you want to minimize your defeat or if you want to gamble for e victory.

It's much more subtible than I thougt. I have still a lot of things to learn,

Thanks for the quick answer and a terrific service.

Johan P
 
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Nomadic Gamer
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I don't follow.
Why not play it as a maximum # (10?) ?
If your opponent can beat you with a better hand,
-1 won't stop him but a higher minus will make him use up good TC.
 
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Anton Telle
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-1 means that you stay -1 in the fight. Your opponent is +1. So it is still your turn to play a TC. Instead you end the fight at that count. Your opponent cannot play TCs anymore in this fight.

You might ask: Why would you want to end the fight? Well, for instance, you may have gone into the fight, thinking you have got a chance to win. Now you see that you have not.
Another reason may be that you are attacking with army superiority, and you may want to attack over and over again (each round) to drain TCs from you opponent. (A tactic often used by the allies.)
Or you are being attacked, but you do not want to fight till the end. So you might want to end with a reserve since you do not have the right TC in that suit to end the fight with minimum losses. (A tactic often seen played by Friedrich.)
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Mark Luta
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In fact, it is just this rules subtlety, that it is often best to lose a battle by a small margin (ideally -1), which is surprisingly one of the best parts of this game as far as emulating these campaigns is concerned! When we study military history, the battles are clearly defined, and one tries to understand the logic of the field marshal who moved from one battle to the next, and why...

However, this is not really the relevant view the contemporary field marshal would have had! Instead, a campaign consisted of much marching and countermarching, threatening supply routes, defending one's own communications, probing where the enemy was, trying to screen one's own movements from the enemy...As a result, most contact between opposing forces did not result in a major battle, but just some skirmishing, maybe some exchange of artillery fire, but nothing which made the history books. The major battles occur only when both sides decide to fight, so presumably either both sides think they can win, or one side sees no choice but to at least slow the enemy army a bit. All of which is well emulated in Friedrich, by rewarding normally not fighting, unless one is pretty confident of either a victory, or at least a chance of inflicting serious harm on the enemy (battles on sector edges, where one uses a different suit than the enemy, can be particularly good places to set up for a fight!).

For the historically curious, the Clash of Arms BAR game 'Leuthen' contains an excellent writeup on this regard of that particular battle. Most military historians seem to analyze the battle along the lines of 'what in the world was Archduke Charles thinking?!?' or 'too bad for the Austrians Daun was not in command'. But this historian points out the Austrians were coming off a major victory at Breslau earlier in the month, Friedrich had made a long forced march from Rossbach and his victory there in hopes of staving off a complete loss of Silesia in 1757. So looking at the situation of the campaign in this light, the fact there was already snow on the ground and winter offensives in the previous war had pretty much accomplished nothing, that writeup postulates the Austrians did not believe Friedrich intended to fight a major battle until the next spring (had they expected a battle, likely they would have remained in the fortifications at Breslau). Instead, Charles was probably simply moving his army back west, to head into winter quarters which would protect his own lines of commuincations, while threatening those of Friedrich. In contrast, Friedrich fully understood he was on the brink of losing Silesia, and hence his dreams of a more powerful Prussia, and understood his need to risk everything on one more battle that year. And, helping the Prussians, was the fact this was the very ground their army had used for practice maneuvers between wars, so their generals knew it very well.
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