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Outlaws: Adventures in the Old West» Forums » General

Subject: Simple Bank Robbery rss

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David Wasson
United States
Erie
Pennsylvania
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Here's a simple scenario for a bank robbery:

Use the same characters and map layout for "Shootout Two - Midday Deadrock" I did not have a character card prepared for Jim, so I substituted Luke. Use the same type of handguns and reloads in Shootout Two.

Jim and Luke are the townsfolk. One of them is the Sheriff and the other is the Deputy Sheriff. The Sheriff starts in the Sheriff's office behind the desk. The Deputy starts in the saloon at a table, having a nice quiet drink, (of course!). All weapons are holstered.

The Outlaws, Clay and Jesse, start outside the bank, dismounted, next to thier horses. The horses are tied to the rail. All weapons are holstered. One of the Outlaws is carrying dynamite to open the safe. Use the dynamite rules from Shootout Five. (by the way, the dynamite was left out in the "items carried" list for Shootout Five, how are ya' gonna' blow up the safe without dynamite?!). The safe has one money bag inside.

The towns folk action counters remain in thier cup until they are alerted by the explosion of the dynamite. As soon as the dynamite blows, the townsfolk (Jim and Luke), take turns with the Outlaws. Since both side have an equal number of action points, (unless someone is injured in the explosion) use a 6D to determine which side goes first until one side has fewer action points. (The side with fewer points always goes second).

The Outlaws win if one Outlaw exits off the west side of the map. The horses might help to make a fast getaway!

The Townsfolk have to prevent the Outlaws from exiting with the money.

The Outlaw that does not blow up the safe, cannot shoot either of the townsfolk through a window, that's dirty pool! But, the "non dynamite" Outlaw can "wait" near the saloon or sheriff's office for the townsfolk to exit.

I like to have an objective other than just killing the "other guys". Blowing up a safe, stealing money and leaving town is great fun!

David











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David Murray
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Thanks David - I am collecting ideas for a scenario pack...
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Brett Schaller
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I'd like to see some scenarios with fewer characters - two or three on each side. I don't always have space to set up all those character cards!
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David Wasson
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This scenario fills that request. A total of only four characters. Two on each side!
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David Murray
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Hi Brett - I hear you...
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David Wasson
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I played this scenario last night with a real opponent, (versus playing both sides by myself.) A scenario with just a few characters can end pretty quick. We played twice, and switched sides for each game. I won both, my opponent's comment was that it seemed that whichever side received the first wound, would probably lose. In larger scenarios with more characters, this "first wound" is not such a problem. But this situation is probably quite realistic. How many gun shots can you receive before it has a negative effect on you? Probably just one! If you have four or more characters on a side, you can have one or more characters shot and still be in the game with the other less wounded characters. We will try again perhaps next week with more characters, maybe even tip the balance towards my opponent so I can get him to play again! The moral is "don't get shot". For those of you that have played "Gunslinger", it too, is very unforgiving. This "unforgivingness" is exactly why I like Outlaws. Tactical level combat can be brutal, and brief.

Just a few thoughts about small scenarios versus large scenarios.
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David Murray
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Hi David, there is no doubt that the first wound in smaller scenarios has a greater impact on the game. Has your opponent had a chance to read the outlaw survival guide? One of the things I notice most when players first come to the game is a tendency for their characters to be a little static and just try to shoot it out. A character might feel safe being in good cover, but if your opponent is also then you need a good reason to stay and trade shots. Unless you have a distinct advantage in the exchange of fire then you need to move and change the tactical situation.

Let us look at a two on one situation where the characters are outside a building. There is no doubt that the single character is at a disadvantage and unless they try something different they are going to come off worse in any straight exchange of shots (unless of course they are armed with a rifle and the others are some distance away with handguns). The first tactic is to drop behind cover at the end of your actions, so your opponent can only get snapshots at you. This is a useful tactic especially if they have to cross some open space to close the distance as you may catch them in the open, however this tactic gives the two opposing characters too much of the initiative and eventually one will outflank the single character. Therefore, when in such a situation you need to move, your aim is to get into a position where only one enemy can see you – you will have to chance their snapshot and then try to take them out or at least slow them down. The character may need to shift position each turn. When the enemy is too close or no more good positions remain, you need to step inside. Once inside you need to play cat and mouse so when you face an enemy it is in a one to one situation, don’t be afraid to be aggressive, but avoid brawling at all costs. This is tough and the odds are stacked against you, but if they fluff their snapshot you are in with a chance…

Now none of the above is easy but I have pulled it off a few times – you best hope is your opponent gets a bit too overconfident and offers you an opening.
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