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1870: Railroading across the Trans Mississippi from 1870» Forums » General

Subject: Paper Money quantity rss

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Filipe Cunha
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I'm creating a high-quality set to substitute the paper money of some games, can someone help me out here? I need to know which bill denominations does it comes with and how many of each.

Thanks for the help!
 
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Werner Bär
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endou_kenji wrote:
I need to know which bill denominations does it comes with and how many of each.

No, you don't. You need to know what you need for the game.

You need either a lot more $1 notes than what is included, or (better) also use $2 notes (and $20 notes, when you're at it).
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Shawn Fox
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Most people who play a lot of 18xx games use poker chips instead of the paper money.
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Lutz
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Most 18xx games have a bank of 10,000 to 15,000. If you look at some of the poker chip threads here there are several suggestions of sets people have built. You could follow those denominations.

But, I'm in the camp with the rest... get a nice set of poker chips. I use my poker chips for all our 18xx games and many other games that have paper money which is a pain to use. I am even considering getting a second set so I can keep one in the car for game nights and one in the house for when I host.

BOb
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John Buckland
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Interesting idea.

You could use cards if you don't want public money.

Careful design will pay off in terms of space needed and readability.

Right now my gtoup uses chips, with tubes for privacy when needed.

Below is my distribution for a $15000 bank.
The $2s are useful in 18xx.
I adjust for the specific game (eg $12000 for 1856)
The $1000 and $5000 are extra, for other games with higher totals.

Count Value Color
40 1 White
30 2 Orange
40 5 Red
40 10 Dk Blue
40 20 Green
50 50 Pink
40 100 Lt Blue
10 200 Black
10 500 Burgundy
[10] 1000 Yellow
[2] 5000 Purple


Good luck!
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Chris Shaffer
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Privacy?
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Lutz
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TheCat wrote:
Privacy?


What about it. It's all public info.

BOb

 
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John Buckland
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TheCat wrote:
Privacy?


Our group plays 1856 keeping corporation money private.
 
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uncalled1st wrote:
TheCat wrote:
Privacy?


Our group plays 1856 keeping corporation money private.


It is fully known and trackable. Keeping it private only gives advantages to those with better memories. 18xx is not about memory. I would rather just keep all the money public than have people keeping their own records as to how much each corp/player has. The games are long enough.

Also, many people use moderator software which keeps all corporate and private money values for you, so it is all public.

BOb
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John Buckland
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I'm not convinced that open money has an affect on game time. Excessive recordkeeping and transfers certainly will. The 1856 rules are clear that corporation money is private. I've always played with private money for both players and corportations in 1830. We count all our money under the table. I think this is now a style preference, perhaps because it was poorly addressed in the 1830 rules, or perhaps because it isn't very consistent with chips or the moderator. It seems that open money is more common.

My group has been using a timer to keep the game moving. One minute per corporation operating round or stock round action, starting the next player after payouts, transactions or getting change. If you want an extra minute, you take a chit. If you get too many chits, it costs you at the end of the game. Very effective.

 
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Werner Bär
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pilotbob wrote:
uncalled1st wrote:
Our group plays 1856 keeping corporation money private.

It is fully known and trackable.

In 1856, if you buy a train across companies, the price paid is not public knowledge, according to the rules.
 
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J C Lawrence
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Any shareholder may request the exact contents of a company treasury. Until everyone plays open, this often results in a litany of players requesting a treasury accounting at every decision point.

1831 is the only game I know of which has explicitly hidden and untrackable company treasuries.
 
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William Dixon
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Actually "Some people" who play a lot use poker chips.

I find chips to be more fiddly, take more time and effort to keep organized than paper money, cost more, are more of a pain to transport, and generally slow things down.

You mileage may vary of course.

There seems to be a group think about the use of poker chips vs paper money. You either like them or don't. Sadly some poker chip users have a very condescending attitude to paper money users.

Use what works for you. Be prepared to be flexible when gaming with a group that does not use your preferred method.
After all the camaraderie of playing the game is more important that the individual components.

As to 1870 (and 1856) Mayfair adjusted the cash amount to suit money sets that were readily available to them.

As the deigned the bank was:
$ 11,980 in the following denominations:
20 x $ 1
30 x $ 2
20 x $ 5
20 x $ 10
30 x $ 20
20 x $ 50
50 x $ 100
and 10 x $ 500.

There were also 10 x $ 1000 that are used after the bank is broken to allow the final set of operating rounds to be completed.

The bills were all in tens as the sheets of money I was making had ten bills per page.

Bill Dixon
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Stephe Thomas
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To answer the OP's request, 40x1, 20x5, 26x10, 30x20, 20x50, 30x100, 14x500. The only conceivable merit in sticking to this combination is that it's faithful to Mayfair's distribution. It's next to useless for playing 1870, or indeed just about any other 18xx. For added fidelity you should make the 10s and 50s virtually indistinguishable in colour except in very good light.

In 1870, the price a corporation pays to buy a train from another corporation need not be revealed to the other players. The rules are silent on whether the price a corporation pays to buy a private company must be revealed. Everything else a corporation does has publicly-known costs, so is trackable.

In some, mostly older, 18xx games such as 1830, the rules are silent on whether the few variable-cost corporate transactions need be revealed publicly, yet make treasuries private information.

Making players track stuff like this will likely slow the game down, so most groups make corporation treasuries publicly known even for games where the rules say otherwise. It's hard to audit transactions if they're secret. While outright cheating is thankfully rare, infractions through other causes are common enough that it's worthwhile making everything public for this reason alone. Most modern 18xx games make everything trackable.

Using paper money when poker chips are available is very much a minority preference. Bill's group does, but I do not recall any other group chiming "us too" when this issue has been raised in the past. Switching to chips (actually chips designed for roulette, but the principle applies) trimmed up to a couple of hours off the length of 1837 for us, and this sort of gain seems to be reflected in most other groups.
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