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Subject: Time travel Mechanic rss

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Werner
United Kingdom
Grimsby
N.E. Lincolnshire
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Hi all,

I thought of an interesting mechanic this morning.

Can one simulate time travel in a board game?

Maybe one can plan movements ahead of your turn, and then they can become reality if your current moves concur with what you've planned?

I haven't thought this through yet but have a feeling it can work?

Tracking past moves may be done with a deck of cards?

Any ideas?

Regards,

Werner.

Also see Geeklist: http://boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/149315/the-analogue-game-k...
 
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Russ Williams
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Search GeekLists for titles with "time travel" - there are several such lists of various time travel games which might spark ideas for you.
 
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Scott Nelson
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Draper
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Khronos
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James Hutchings
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You could have a mechanic where if you create a paradox you lose. For example if you bring a piece 'from 5 moves in the future' you effectively pledge that you'll have a piece of that type in a position to travel back in time in 5 moves.

This would obviously require a lot of record-keeping.

EDIT: Perhaps pieces from 'further in the future' are more powerful, but make it easier for the opponent to force a paradox.
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James Hutchings
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Another option would be to make it work the way a lot of science fiction works: different times are different areas of the board, and events in 'early' areas can have effects in 'later' ones.

Since the early boards would have more strategic value, perhaps they're more difficult to get to.
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Chad Adams
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Windermere
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I just purchased the new game Legacy: Gears of Time. It's a time travel game that is simply amazing. My favorite game of BGG.com. You build a legacy by inventing things such as "Combustion Engine" or "The Internet" then jump earlier in time to build its dependencies like "fire" or "electricity".
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Ludwig Seitz
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Have a look at Time Agent. Although the mechanics are a bit aged, I think it's still a pretty good take on the time-travel mechanic.
 
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The Chaz
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Werner,
You definitely need to check out Legacy: Gears of Time (mentioned above).
From the demo I did last weekend at BGG-con, the time travel looks exactly as you described.
 
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Angelus Seniores
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James' idea looks good.
3 boards, one for each time period.
lets assume that only the last period has the time travel technology, period 2 could develop timetravel, but only with certain conditions fulfilled and more expensive/more difficult
It would be impossible in period 1 as too many needed elements are missing (its way before the industrial era)
any pawns sent to a past period could control an area there, thereby causing that area to be under that player's control during the period following it, any other player'spawn on that area would be redeployed to any other legal area, this redeployment happens before the actual 'turn' of that period
The downside of sending a pawn to the past would be that its removed from its time period (combined with a pawn limit) and cannot return and timetravel takes some resources
player pawns would also vary in strength depending on their period of origin (the later period has the best technology thus is stronger and would thus have a bigger impact if its sent to the past, outclassing lesser period pawns)

turn phasing would be;
Period 1 turn

period 2 turn, first redeploy pawns as needed by area control of previous period, then perform the normal turn, if you develop time travel in this period, you can send pawns to either period 1 or 3.

period 3 turn first redeploy pawns as needed by area control of previous period, then perform the normal turn
possible move of pawn to either period 1 or 2

And to win, only the situation of the board of the 3rd period gives victory points.


Another way to work with timetravel is to have pawns that are in several pieces; when it moves through time 1 part remains behind in its current time period, this way 1 part can affect the past while the other part still affects the future (ie considered as being before the actual travel) and gains a benefit of some sort as it gains knowledge passed onto him from his 'previous' self
each period would have its own 'time-turn rate' and a pawn moving through time (if using pawns in 3 parts) would have 1 part in its actual period-turn, 1 part in the period-turn that is considered the moment at which he time-travels and the last part actually going to the past and providing a benefit.
this way, you could resend the same pawn through time again as long as its moment of time travel is before its previous moment of time travel and if the turn of the period reaches the turn of the time-travel, that pawn simply dissapears and only lives in the past at its last occurence.
example:
pawn parts 1/2/3 of the same pawn are in turn 1 of the 'late' period.
turn 1:
owner decides to move its pawn to the past and considers this to happen on the 10th turn of the period. so part 1 remains in its current position, part 2 is placed on the 10th turn of the period (to indicate the moment of timetravel) and part 3 is moved to the past ('early' period) giving a benefit to its part 1.
on turn 2;
owner decides for the same pawn to again do a time-travel (considered to now happen on turn 9 instead), part 1 remains on turn 2, part 2 is moved from turn 10 to the 9th turn and part 3 is removed from its current location to the newly chosen position.
on turn 9; as the pawn in the late period reaches the moment of its earliest time-travel, both its parts 1 and 2 are removed from the game, only its part 3 in the 'early' period can act.
this way the owner has to decide whether to time-travel to obtain a benefit, but with a certain loss of its pawn once that turn is reached (at least if we consider timetravel from the past to the future to be impossible), effectively reducing its 'lifetime' in the 'late' period
Obviously, the more parts in which you can divide a pawn, the more it can 'co-exist' in different periods and the moment any 2 parts of the same pawn are in the same period, the time-paradox comes into effect effectively removing all parts of that pawn from the game
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Laura Creighton
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US Patent Number 1

If you want to be silly, you cannot beat this game.

Extremely low replay value. But this is not inherant. In this one is buried the seed of an endurable (though still very silly) game.

Should be a natural to be 'steampunked' -- if that is a verb.
 
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Tuomas Korppi
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How about a trick taking game, where you could, at certain situations travel a specified number of tricks back? (I.e. the hands are reconstructed a specified number of tricks back.) I chose trick taking game, since handling cards like in tournament bridge makes it easy to reconstruct hands at previous points of the game.
 
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Werner
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Angelsenior wrote:


Another way to work with timetravel is to have pawns that are in several pieces; when it moves through time 1 part remains behind in its current time period, this way 1 part can affect the past while the other part still affects the future (ie considered as being before the actual travel) and gains a benefit of some sort as it gains knowledge passed onto him from his 'previous' self
each period would have its own 'time-turn rate' and a pawn moving through time (if using pawns in 3 parts) would have 1 part in its actual period-turn, 1 part in the period-turn that is considered the moment at which he time-travels and the last part actually going to the past and providing a benefit.
this way, you could resend the same pawn through time again as long as its moment of time travel is before its previous moment of time travel and if the turn of the period reaches the turn of the time-travel, that pawn simply dissapears and only lives in the past at its last occurence.
example:
pawn parts 1/2/3 of the same pawn are in turn 1 of the 'late' period.
turn 1:
owner decides to move its pawn to the past and considers this to happen on the 10th turn of the period. so part 1 remains in its current position, part 2 is placed on the 10th turn of the period (to indicate the moment of timetravel) and part 3 is moved to the past ('early' period) giving a benefit to its part 1.
on turn 2;
owner decides for the same pawn to again do a time-travel (considered to now happen on turn 9 instead), part 1 remains on turn 2, part 2 is moved from turn 10 to the 9th turn and part 3 is removed from its current location to the newly chosen position.
on turn 9; as the pawn in the late period reaches the moment of its earliest time-travel, both its parts 1 and 2 are removed from the game, only its part 3 in the 'early' period can act.
this way the owner has to decide whether to time-travel to obtain a benefit, but with a certain loss of its pawn once that turn is reached (at least if we consider timetravel from the past to the future to be impossible), effectively reducing its 'lifetime' in the 'late' period
Obviously, the more parts in which you can divide a pawn, the more it can 'co-exist' in different periods and the moment any 2 parts of the same pawn are in the same period, the time-paradox comes into effect effectively removing all parts of that pawn from the game


I really like this idea!! Awesome build.

I like the mini that can split into 3, nice touch and practical mechanic.

One can always still add the three playing boards, one past, one current one future? But I like the use of the turn numbers better, less table space needed.

Thanks for your interest, this is the kind of ideas I am looking for!

Regards,

Werner

 
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Werner
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ropearoni4 wrote:


Thanks will check out the game rulebook. The ideal though would be to play it sometime cool
 
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Werner
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apeloverage wrote:
You could have a mechanic where if you create a paradox you lose. For example if you bring a piece 'from 5 moves in the future' you effectively pledge that you'll have a piece of that type in a position to travel back in time in 5 moves.

This would obviously require a lot of record-keeping.

EDIT: Perhaps pieces from 'further in the future' are more powerful, but make it easier for the opponent to force a paradox.


Thanks for the build James!
 
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