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Subject: Entrenchment status of empty armies rss

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Claus Westh Sorensen
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Dear Tim,
While waiting for Nuts Publishing to print the game (I have preordered off course) my friend and I are playing the web published edition of the game. We have run into a few questions regarding the rules we hope you can help answering. I’ll put my questions in different threads in this forum. My first question is regarding the following rule;

“4.3 Entrenchment Status.
(…)
When an empty army moves into an area containing an entrenched infantry unit, it may immediately incorporate the infantry unit into itself and thus become entrenched as well. (…).”

I am trying to get my head around this rule, but there may be something I have misunderstood. I’ll try to explain how I understand the rule, hoping you can put the finger on any wrong interpretation I may have.
Right, here’s how I understand the rule;

If I understand the movement rules correctly a player can move any and all units/armies during an Offensive, but is limited to moving a single unit/army during a Pass. Moving an empty army into an area containing an entrenched infantry unit and “incorporating” it constitutes two moves (the army moving into the area + the unit in the area moving into the army). Therefore the event the above mentioned rule applies to can only happen during an offensive, because the player is only allowed to move a single unit during a Pass, correct?

Normally moving an army would result in the army ending the move un-entrenched. The same goes for an infantry unit, unless the unit enters an army that is already entrenched. The abovementioned rule is therefore an exception to the normal rules, as it allows an entrenched infantry unit to move into an empty un-entrenched army AND change the entrenchment status of the army, correct?

If my assumptions are correct so far, am I then also correct in assuming that the above mentioned rule (the exception) only applies to empty armies moving into an area containing an entrench infantry unit - in contrast to an empty un-entrenched army already in an area containing an entrenched infantry unit? Say a German player plays an Entente Military crisis card resulting in the Entente player removing the only unit in an un-entrenched army located in an area also containing an entrenched infantry unit (on its own). In the following Entente player turn the entrenched unit is moved into the now empty un-entrenched army in the area. As the empty un-entrenched army did not move the situation is not covered by the above mentioned rule (the exception), and the army (now containing the infantry unit) would still be un-entrenched. But had the army moved into the area, the army would end up entrenched after the infantry unit moved into it?

Regards,
Claus Westh
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Tim Taylor
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Quote:
Moving an empty army into an area containing an entrenched infantry unit and “incorporating” it constitutes two moves (the army moving into the area + the unit in the area moving into the army). Therefore the event the above mentioned rule applies to can only happen during an offensive, because the player is only allowed to move a single unit during a Pass, correct?

This is incorrect. The only unit moving is the Army; it incorporates any indiidual units as part of its movement. The units do not "move" per se which is why I used the word "incorporate" rather than "move".

Quote:
The abovementioned rule is therefore an exception to the normal rules, as it allows an entrenched infantry unit to move into an empty un-entrenched army AND change the entrenchment status of the army, correct?

This is also incorrect. The infantry does not move. Moving negates entrenchment status. Again, the only unit moving is the Army.

Maybe it would help if you saw an example of an infantry moving into an Army, so you can see the differences here.

Consider an unentrenched Army in area "A", let's say this Army already contains some units. Also in area "A" is an entrenched Infantry unit. The player may move the infantry into the Army, but of course then the infantry would lose its entrenchment status. That is one move.

Now moving an Army into an area and incorporating any individual units within its logistical structural also counts as only one move.

Perhaps it would be better to think of an Army as a higher echelon command structure moving in and taking over all lower echelon operations in the area.

Hope this helps.

TT
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Claus Westh Sorensen
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Quote:

Consider an unentrenched Army in area "A", let's say this Army already contains some units. Also in area "A" is an entrenched Infantry unit. The player may move the infantry into the Army, but of course then the infantry would lose its entrenchment status. That is one move.

Now moving an Army into an area and incorporating any individual units within its logistical structural also counts as only one move.

Perhaps it would be better to think of an Army as a higher echelon command structure moving in and taking over all lower echelon operations in the area.

Hope this helps.


Thanks for taking the time Tim!

Let me just see if I get it now ...

When armies move they can incorporate (take over command of) individual units as part of the move.
I take it they can only incorporate individual units (as part of the move) in the area where the army ENDS its move (area B), as any individual units incorporated into the moving army in the area, where the army BEGAN its move (area A), would be considered a move by the unit, right?
Oh ... and if an individual unit was incorporated into an army (in area A) that would prevent the army form moving to area B, because the unit that was incorporated had already moved, correct?

Also armies cannot "drop off" units as part of the army-move. That would be considered a move made by the unit (the unit leaving the army), right?

Now what happens in this situation:
An empty army moves into an area containing two individual infantry units - one of which is entrenched the other is not?
I take it the player can choose to incorporate any or both units or none at all? But the army would only end up beeing entrenched if it incorporated the entrenched unit (and not the other)?



 
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Tim Taylor
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Quote:
I take it they can only incorporate individual units (as part of the move) in the area where the army ENDS its move (area B), as any individual units incorporated into the moving army in the area, where the army BEGAN its move (area A), would be considered a move by the unit, right?

Correct, but this only matters when a player Passes.

Quote:
Oh ... and if an individual unit was incorporated into an army (in area A) that would prevent the army form moving to area B, because the unit that was incorporated had already moved, correct?

Incorrect when playing an Offensive. True, the individual unit moved, but it moved zero areas; the individual unit is allowed to move at least one area.

However, this is correct during a Pass, since only one unit may move when Passing.

Quote:
Also armies cannot "drop off" units as part of the army-move. That would be considered a move made by the unit (the unit leaving the army), right?

Again, correct if you're talking about a Pass situation. During an Offensive, units can be dropped off, but can only move further this player turn if they have movement left.

Quote:
Now what happens in this situation:
An empty army moves into an area containing two individual infantry units - one of which is entrenched the other is not?
I take it the player can choose to incorporate any or both units or none at all?

Depending on the circumstances, the player can choose any of these options. However, an empty Army must retreat when in a Disputed area, so it will have to incorporate at least one infantry to remain.

This situation you describe will most often result in an entrenched Army containing two infantry. Here's the sequence of events:

1- The empty Army moves into the area containing two individual infantry units, one entrenched and one not.

2- As part of its movement, the Army incorporates the entrenched infantry, and thus the Army becomes entrenched.

3- Completing its movement, the Army then incorporates the unentrenched infantry, which becomes entrenched as soon as it becomes part of the entrenched Army.

Again, it might help you to visualize the Army as an HQ which commands subordinate forces rather than a drift-net scooping up tuna.

It is only during a Pass player turn that any of this becomes revelant because of the one unit move limit.
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