Recommend
2 
 Thumb up
 Hide
19 Posts

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Gaming Related » General Gaming

Subject: What's going on with game pricing?? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Aaron Davies
United Kingdom
Pulford
Cheshire
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Games are wildly inconsistant on the scale of 'What you get' to 'What you pay'. For example King of Tokyo £29.99 (about $48us!!) or Ankh Morpork £29.99. One has a few card characters, a token board, dice and a deck of cards. The other has a huge board, loads of cards, 4 sets of wooden tokens and is based on an existing brand (so presumably had to pay for it). It doesn't take much to realise what game has more in and is clearly better value as far as what you get for what you pay.

Can we keep how much fun a game is out of this if we can? I'm talking pure and simple about how much physical product you get for your money.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Eugene van der Pijll
Netherlands
Leidschendam
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Pie Golem wrote:
Can we keep how much fun a game is out of this if we can? I'm talking pure and simple about how much physical product you get for your money.

You can't keep the quality out of this.

The price of an economic good is determined both by how much the seller needs/wants and by how much the customer is willing to pay. If enough people think that $48 is a good price to pay for a game like King of Tokyo, then why shouldn't the publisher price it that high?

If the price is too high, the game won't be sold, and the price will come down.
8 
 Thumb up
0.01
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jon Day
United Kingdom
Lee
LONDON
flag msg tools
Oi!
badge
That tickles!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
You are comparing apples to oranges.

Ankh Morpork had a very large print run for a hobby game.

Also you are not comparing RRP on these titles (AM regularly priced at Smiths etc. at £35+, I paid £18 ish for KOT).

Even if a game is priced the same the print run and distribution of the game will play a very large part in how much the game costs.

i.e. here in belgium Ankh Morpork costs about £40 to purchase, KOT about £25.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andy Evans
United Kingdom
Solihull
West Midlands
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
A lot can also depend on shipping and logistics. You can sometimes get some weird situations where for example a game by an American publisher could be produced in Germany, shipped over to the US, and then shipped over to the UK as that publisher has the rights for the English language version.

It sounds mad, but it happens.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Clare Cannon
Wales
Trefforest
Mid Glamorgan
flag msg tools
Avatar
mb
It also depends upon the components in the box.... Dice for example are an expensive component. Cards get really expensive if they all have individual artworks.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
A boy named Sioux
United Kingdom
York
North Yorkshire
flag msg tools
badge
Meow.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Is no one willing to pay for the design, play testing and overall quality of the game? I don't think it's such a good idea to take stock of "what you get" solely in terms of components. That would be a bit like going to a gourmet restaurant and complaining you just paid a lot of money for a bit of meat and vegetables that you could pick up for a fraction of the price at the supermarket.
13 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
chuck dunn
United States
Memphis
Tennessee
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
pricing and print run is the seemingly best way to understand this

larger print run= cheaper cost = cheaper game

small print run= higher cost = expensive game
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Rich Shipley
United States
Baltimore
Maryland
flag msg tools
badge
the liberal unsavory type
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm not sure what the problem is or what a solution would be. If a game costs more than you want to pay, don't buy it.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jon W
United States
Aurora
CO
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Siouxfire wrote:
Is no one willing to pay for the design, play testing and overall quality of the game? I don't think it's such a good idea to take stock of "what you get" solely in terms of components. That would be a bit like going to a gourmet restaurant and complaining you just paid a lot of money for a bit of meat and vegetables that you could pick up for a fraction of the price at the supermarket.

By this reasoning, a game with great components at a fair price--measured solely in terms of physical production--must be deficient in "quality". That, or publishers sometimes "take one for the team" and refuse to pass on the "quality costs" to their customers.

I appreciate the sentiment embodied in your analogy, but I think it's inapt: the contrast isn't fast-food versus haute cuisine; it's gourmet versus gourmet.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Enrico Viglino
United States
Eugene
OR
flag msg tools
Slowed - BGG's moderation policies have driven me partially from here
badge
http://thegamebox.byethost15.com/smf/
Avatar
mb
Rockhopper01 wrote:
Pie Golem wrote:
I'm talking pure and simple about how much physical product you get for your money.


Do you base the quality of a book solely on the number of pages?


Maybe not - but price is often determined by such (until something
hits the bargain bin - usually a sign that it shouldn't have been
produced in the quantity that it was).
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kaiwen Zhang
Canada
Montreal
Quebec
flag msg tools
Welcome to Zombo.com!
badge
Art of life
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
to be honest, king of tokyo is widely considered overpriced. could be Garfield is charging more for the design than Wallace.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jack Smith
United Kingdom
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
While I agree some games are overpriced the last thing I care much about is components. I am paying for the quality of the game.

As to the economics of pricing that is well known and fairly obvious to anyone I would have thought. The more you make the less the unit price which means the cheaper you can sell it and still make the return needed. That gives latitude to the price, which the publisher will decide depending on the demographic he is selling to and what outlets he wishes to use.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Rob Doupe
Canada
Calgary
Alberta
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Pie Golem wrote:
Games are wildly inconsistant on the scale of 'What you get' to 'What you pay'. For example King of Tokyo £29.99 (about $48us!!) or Ankh Morpork £29.99. One has a few card characters, a token board, dice and a deck of cards. The other has a huge board, loads of cards, 4 sets of wooden tokens and is based on an existing brand (so presumably had to pay for it). It doesn't take much to realise what game has more in and is clearly better value as far as what you get for what you pay.



King of Tokyo just sold out another print run. My retailer sold all 20 copies of this run on reserve, so it didn't even make it onto shelves. I can't find a copy anywhere.

And this isn't a brand-new game pumped up on unproven buzz. Clearly, the buying public disagrees with you about the value of the game.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Drew Hicks
United States
Raleigh
North Carolina
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Pie Golem wrote:
Games are wildly inconsistant on the scale of 'What you get' to 'What you pay'. For example King of Tokyo £29.99 (about $48us!!) or Ankh Morpork £29.99. One has a few card characters, a token board, dice and a deck of cards. The other has a huge board, loads of cards, 4 sets of wooden tokens and is based on an existing brand (so presumably had to pay for it). It doesn't take much to realise what game has more in and is clearly better value as far as what you get for what you pay.

Can we keep how much fun a game is out of this if we can? I'm talking pure and simple about how much physical product you get for your money.


"Clearly better value" is a very loaded term here. Yeah, Ankh-Morpork has more stuff in. But, if you're talking about how much product you can get for your money, you can buy printed card stock and wooden cubes for much cheaper than Ankh-Morpork, so Ankh-Morpork is, comparatively, a rip-off if all you care about is 'stuff'.

"How much fun a game is" is a product of design effort; presumably, game creators were paid for their time, playtesters were paid for their time, artists were paid for their time and effort, and none of these things are so easily quantifiable as "well, did it add any weight to the box?"

Basically, this argument doesn't make any sense what-so-ever, as when you buy a game, you aren't buying it for the number of objects inside (though components and component quality are surely factors)... you're buying it for the GAME, which could pretty much be just a printed book of rules, but would still have a value greater than that of the paper it's printed on, wouldn't you agree?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jimmy Smith
United States
Tavares
Florida
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Well, consider the The Castles of Burgundy expansion in the BGG store. The cost is $5.00 and you get...4 itty-bitty tiles. That's $1.25 a tile. It's a darn good thing the price of the full game isn't consistent with that, or no one would own it. Yet many, many people will buy this expansion (especially "completists").

Long story short, it's not simply the component quality, nor quantity, that determines a game's price.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Nathan Hortness
Canada
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Pie Golem wrote:
I'm talking pure and simple about how much physical product you get for your money.



There is little to no correlation between the production cost and the sale price for most items. Prices are based on what the market is willing to pay, not some predefined profit margin.

It probably cost less than 5 cents to make most smart phone cases but they routinely sell for $30 or more.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Phil Bootherstone
United Kingdom
Burton on Trent
Staffs
flag msg tools
designer
Giving fast and friendly service in shop and by post for over 25 years
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Talking to one of the oldest small designer/producers earlier this month, he pointed out that production costs are almost neither here nor there - marketing is overwhelmingly the major expense. And here is a scary statistic in support of that; the drought in America's corn belt put food costs up but barely affected the price to US consumers, since on average 85% of food prices in the USA are due to marketing and distribution costs. I'd guess that the percentage is even higher for games.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Rick Teverbaugh
United States
Anderson
Indiana (IN)
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I don't buy games for how they look and I don't judge the value of purchase vs. price by the components. I've never played a $99 game with stunning components that netted me as much enjoyment as Dominion, which costs half of that. So, for me, Dominion is under priced or those big-box, component-heavy game are overpriced or a combination of both.

The fact that King of Tokyo continues to sell and sell, means that most people are happy with the value to cost they are getting. To me it is like buying a Monet. It is still just one painting and it will cost a lot of money. I could get a black velvet painting of Elvis much cheaper from a van parked on the corner. Both purchases net one painting. But the comparison stops there.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.