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Subject: Tutorial Basic Rules - Rough Draft.... please comment rss

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Eric Etkin
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"Steel yourself, lad. This is where the fun begins."

TactDecks: Reign of Heroes is a fully customizable fantasy game that lets you experience the glory, surprise, and thrill of legendary battles. This single TactDecks core set supports 1-4 players, but you can easily mix in additional sets to add more players or increase your building options.

TactDecks is a competitive game. In the core set, the winner is simply determined by the player with at least one Hero remaining. Through an unique combination of army building, territory placement, and tactical genius, you will conquer your opponents by directing your selected heroes to victory!

Play it. Right now.

All right, let's play a basic two player game. If there's no one around, double up and control both sides for this small conflict.

First, select the following components from your TactDecks core set:

2 Commoner tokens and their corresponding Hero cards
2 Archer tokens and their corresponding Hero cards


4 Territory Tiles


Reserve Deck


Battle Deck


Now, arrange the four Territory tiles like this:



This forms a grid of 64 Spaces. The grid is where all your action takes place. When you move your Commoner and Archer tokens, they can move a total number of Spaces equal to their Mobility (MOB) score. With a MOB of 1, an Archer can move one Space, while with a MOB of 2, the Commoner can move two. Moving your MOB score is just one type of Action your Heroes can make. Other Actions include things like attacking, casting spells, or activating Artifacts.

But when you choose to Move, do so carefully - if you are adjacent to an opposing Hero and break that adjacency, your opponent will get a free Opportunity Strike (an attack) against you as you retreat!



Next, each player selects a side of the board and places their Archer and Commoner. You can place them anywhere on your side you like (but you may want to consider starting behind the wall for cover against arrows).

Shuffle your Reserve and Battle decks. Each player draws a single Reserve and Battle card. Don't show the Reserve to the other player, but flip those Battle cards up! For the first Turn in this tutorial, the player with the highest Rank goes first (Normally, the player with the most held Reserves goes first, but we’ll get to that when we cover the second Turn).

Let's start the battle! Each Turn of your game is divided into two Phases. This first Phase is called the Primary Phase. In the Primary Phase, each player can perform two Actions for each of his/her Heroes. In this tutorial, an Action can be only a Move or an Attack. Since you can perform two Actions for each Hero, this means your Hero could Move twice (each time moving a number of Spaces equal to his/her MOB score), or Attack twice (more on that in a second), or Move once and Attack once.

Your Commoner and Archer can Attack any opposing Hero that is adjacent to them. This is called a Near Attack.



Because of his Barrage ability, the Archer can also fire arrows at targets that are not adjacent (up to 6 Spaces away!). This is called a Far Attack.



Your Heroes' Attack (ATT) score indicates how well they can damage an opponent's Strength. Strength is your life! When your Hero loses all of his/her Strength, that's it - That Hero is eliminated from the game.

Ok. So go ahead, Player 1. Decide what your Archer and Commoner are going to do! Just remember, each Hero performs all of his/her Actions before you can continue to the next.

If you want to Move: Move your MOB score to any Space you wish (provided that Space doesn't already have a wall or another Hero in it). But if you break adjacency with an opposing Hero, the other player immediately gets to make an Opportunity Strike (a free Near Attack) against your Hero before you are allowed to complete your movement. If you wish (and your MOB is high enough), you can also break up your movement so that you move before and after an Attack. For example, with his MOB of 2, your Commoner could move one Space, Attack, and then move the other Space.

If you want to Near Attack an Adjacent Opponent: Draw a Battle card!

***If you draw a Miss, at your discretion, you may perform the Battle Option indicated on the card.

***If you draw a Hit, you automatically damage your target’s Strength for an amount of points equal to your Hero’s ATT score (plus Hit bonus if specified on the Battle card), minus your target’s Near Defense score.

If you want to Far Attack an Opponent 6 Spaces away or less, confirm you have Line-of-Sight to your target. Your Hero has Line-of-Sight if you can draw an imaginary line from the middle of your Hero’s token to the middle of your opponent’s token and there are no other Hero or wall pieces blocking it. If you have Line-of-Sight for a Far Attack, draw a Battle card!

***If you draw a Miss, at your discretion, you may perform the Battle Option indicated on the card.

***If you draw a Hit, you automatically damage your target’s Strength for an amount of points equal to your Hero’s ATT score (plus Hit bonus if specified on the Battle card), minus your target’s Far Defense score.

Have you performed two Actions for both your Commoner and Archer? Good! Now it’s Player 2’s turn to do the same. Once both players have finished their turns in the Primary Phase, we move onto the Tactical Phase.

Again, each player draws a single Reserve and Battle card. The player with the highest Battle card Rank goes first in the next Phase - the Tactical Phase.

The Tactical Phase is just like the Primary Phase, except for two differences: In the Tactical Phase, players are allowed only one Action for each of their Heroes. Also, during the Tactical Phase, Heroes can break adjacency with opponents and not expose themselves to Opportunity Strikes. Think of the Tactical Phase as a chance to regroup your Heroes, retreat, or maneuver yourself into a better position to attack in the next Turn!

So who’s Player 1 now? Go ahead: perform one Action for each of your Heroes. When Player 1 is finished, Player 2 does the same. And that’s how a complete TactDecks turn works:

Begin Turn
1. Players draw a Reserve Card.
2. Players determine who goes first in Primary Phase.
3. Primary Phase: Player 1 performs two Actions for each of his Heroes.
4. Primary Phase: Player 2 performs two Actions for each of his Heroes.
5. Players draw a Reserve Card.
6. Players determine who goes first in Tactical Phase
7. Tactical Phase: Player 1 performs one Action for each of his Heroes.
8. Tactical Phase: Player 2 performs one Action for each of his Heroes.
End Turn

Now, you’re probably wondering about those Reserve cards! A Reserve card is drawn before every Phase, and you can hold up to 5 in your hand (if you already have 5, you can’t draw any more).

Reserves serve three different uses:

First, after the very first Primary Phase, the player order is determined by whoever is holding the most Reserve cards. Players holding more cards always go first (in the case of a tie, draw a Battle card and compare Rank).

Second
, Reserves may be discarded during the Tactical Phase to Heal one of your Heroes one point of Strength. You can Heal with a discarded Reserve at any time - even someone else’s turn, and even after your Hero has taken enough damage to be eliminated! You can also discard multiple Reserves at once to Heal multiple points of Strength on a single Hero or multiple Heroes.

Third, and most importantly, a Reserve can be used to "bend" certain Actions you may take or be targeted by. Each Reserve has a potent primary ability which can be used to do things like negate a successful Hit, increase your dealt damage, avoid Opportunity Strikes, move faster, or even turn a Miss into a Hit!

So begin the Primary Phase for your second turn, and get to know your Reserve cards!

When all but one Hero has been eliminated, the game is over. The player of the remaining Hero claims victory - but both players are now on well on their way to becoming TactDecks masters!
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Brandon Myers
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I decided to just bullet point this for ease of reading.

Is the grid more visible on the actual tiles?

I think you should explain what an action is then explain each action.

How does something count as a retreat? Is it if you just move away from an opponent or is it when you move away from an opponent towards your edge of the board?

How is strength tracked?

Edit: Who wins if the last two heroes are eliminated at the same time?
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Eric Etkin
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Thanks!

d3sp41r wrote:
Is the grid more visible on the actual tiles?


It's pretty obvious when you're looking at the printed version. The white crosses pop pretty good.

d3sp41r wrote:
I think you should explain what an action is then explain each action.


Ah! Ok... so I should just front-load the explanation instead of waiting for the time it'd be used?

d3sp41r wrote:
How does something count as a retreat? Is it if you just move away from an opponent or is it when you move away from an opponent towards your edge of the board?


Simply when you break adjacency with an opponent. "Retreat" is probably implying more movement than is necessary to trigger the Op Strike.

As an aside - for purposes of "ownership" of each sides of the board, that's only relevant in the initial placement of pieces. Once the game is underway, "sides" become meaningless.

d3sp41r wrote:
How is strength tracked?


Yeah, the pics I need to put in there should clarify that. You have "Hitpoint" icons on your card. When you take damage, you just throw a marker over the hitpoint.

d3sp41r wrote:
Edit: Who wins if the last two heroes are eliminated at the same time?


That won't ever happen. there's no simultaneous elimination. Even with interruption actions from the Reserves, there's always a sequence of events.
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Quote:
Ah! Ok... so I should just front-load the explanation instead of waiting for the time it'd be used?


That would be what I do but I think that might be a matter of opinion rather than the actual best option.

Quote:
Simply when you break adjacency with an opponent. "Retreat" is probably implying more movement than is necessary to trigger the Op Strike.

As an aside - for purposes of "ownership" of each sides of the board, that's only relevant in the initial placement of pieces. Once the game is underway, "sides" become meaningless.


Is there an ability or reserve card that that cancels "Op Strikes"?

Quote:
Yeah, the pics I need to put in there should clarify that. You have "Hitpoint" icons on your card. When you take damage, you just throw a marker over the hitpoint.


Maybe clips would be better? Less vulnerable to being bumped but probably more expensive in terms of component cost.

Quote:
That won't ever happen. there's no simultaneous elimination. Even with interruption actions from the Reserves, there's always a sequence of events.


So no AoE spells or attacks that would deal 1 damage to all units in certian squares?

Is the Heal action explained or represented on the card?

Are there alternate victory conditions? It seems like if it came down to just a few units it could turn into someone running while the other person tries to chase them down.

It seems like you have your rules pretty set but I would suggest revamping the action system. It feels old school where 1 player resolves their turn and then the other person does their turn.

It might feel more dynamic if you activate a unit and then the opponent activates a unit and then during a status phase they're refreshed.

Near and Far might sound better if replaced with Melee and Ranged that feels a little more thematic to me.

After reading this I'm not sure I understand what a hero is. Is it a unit or is it a special unit?
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d3sp41r wrote:
Is there an ability or reserve card that that cancels "Op Strikes"?


Yes - The "Speed Burst" Reserve does that, as well as one of the Heroes you can play in the non-tutorial (Swordwitch).

d3sp41r wrote:
Maybe clips would be better? Less vulnerable to being bumped but probably more expensive in terms of component cost.


Depending on how the Kickstarter goes, I'll most likely offer some sort of tracking system in the form of a custom die (rotate to display damage) or stones/beads/etc. Another option may be to reformat the thing as a scale that you just slide one marker over. Similar to the clip idea, I guess.

It's all cost-related stuff. I'm cool with adding cost and MSRP if the thing has some sort of gameplay value, but I want to avoid heaping on more parts just to have more parts.

d3sp41r wrote:
So no AoE spells or attacks that would deal 1 damage to all units in certian squares?


Ah! Umm... yes. But it's rare. In the basic tutorial game, definitely not. Once you add in Artifacts... yeah... there's a couple there that could potentially do that. Hmm... when I was writing those up, I wasn't thinking about that in terms of win condition, insofar as I was just viewing it as a "nobody wins" stalemate. Arrgh... so I need to visit that again. Is it bad to have a stalemate? It'd be a very rare occurrence.

d3sp41r wrote:
Is the Heal action explained or represented on the card?


I'm not quite following that one... Do you mean, do the Reserve cards all explicitly state they can be discarded for a 1 point Heal? I'd considered putting that on there, but it seemed redundant, since it's a rule about how to use the card rather than a conditional rule native to the card itself.

d3sp41r wrote:
Are there alternate victory conditions? It seems like if it came down to just a few units it could turn into someone running while the other person tries to chase them down.


There's no alternate conditions in the base game, other than elimination. I'll probably put some additional variants either online or in the back of the rulebook.

d3sp41r wrote:
It seems like you have your rules pretty set but I would suggest revamping the action system. It feels old school where 1 player resolves their turn and then the other person does their turn.

It might feel more dynamic if you activate a unit and then the opponent activates a unit and then during a status phase they're refreshed.

Near and Far might sound better if replaced with Melee and Ranged that feels a little more thematic to me.


Well, keep in mind... players are only going to have about 4-6 units each. I've tried different ways of resolving this, but at the end of the day I'm trying to capture a D&D combat sort of feel with minimal cost in a 40-60 minute game.

d3sp41r wrote:
After reading this I'm not sure I understand what a hero is. Is it a unit or is it a special unit?


Just a unit. All units are called Heroes.
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Eric Etkin
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Ok - all the example pictures are up.
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Revised! Thank you Samantha and Brandon!


"Steel yourself, lad. This is where the fun begins."

TactDecks: Reign of Heroes is a fully customizable fantasy game that lets you experience the glory, surprise, and thrill of legendary battles. This single TactDecks core set supports 1-4 players, but you can easily mix in additional sets to add more players or increase your building options.

TactDecks is a competitive game. In the core set, the winner is simply determined by the player with at least one Hero remaining. Through an unique combination of army building, territory placement, and tactical genius, you will conquer your opponents by directing your selected heroes to victory!

Play it. Right now.



All right, let's play a basic two player game. If there's no one around, double up and control both sides for this small conflict.

First, select the following components from your TactDecks core set:

2 Commoner tokens and their corresponding Hero cards
2 Archer tokens and their corresponding Hero cards


4 Territory Tiles


Reserve Deck


Battle Deck


Now, arrange the four Territory tiles like this:



This forms a grid of 64 Spaces. The grid is where all your action takes place. When you move your Commoner and Archer tokens, they can move a total number of Spaces equal to their Mobility (MOB) score. With a MOB of 1, an Archer can move one Space, while with a MOB of 2, the Commoner can move two. Moving your MOB score is just one type of Action your Heroes can make. Actions are the voluntary choices you make for each of your Heroes when it's your turn, and you have a limited amount of Actions you can make per Hero at any given time. Besides moving, Actions include things like attacking, casting spells, or activating Artifacts.

But when you choose to Move, do so carefully - if you are adjacent to an opposing Hero and break that adjacency, your opponent may get a free Opportunity Strike (an attack) against you (depending on what Phase you are in... more on that later)!



Next, each player selects a side of the board and places their Archer and Commoner. You can place them anywhere on your side you like (but you may want to consider starting behind the wall for cover against arrows).

Shuffle your Reserve and Battle decks. Each player draws a single Reserve and Battle card. Don't show the Reserve to the other player, but flip those Battle cards up! For the first Turn in this tutorial, the player with the highest Rank on the drawn Battle cards goes first (Normally, the player with the most held Reserves goes first, but we’ll get to that when we cover the second Turn).

Let's start the battle! Each Turn of your game is divided into two Phases. This first Phase is called the Primary Phase. In the Primary Phase, each player can perform two Actions for each of his/her Heroes. In this tutorial, an Action can be only a Move or an Attack. Since you can perform two Actions for each Hero, this means your Hero could Move twice (each time moving a number of Spaces equal to his/her MOB score), or Attack twice (more on that in a second), or Move once and Attack once.

Your Commoner and Archer can Attack any opposing Hero that is adjacent to them. This is called a Near Attack.



Because of his Barrage ability, the Archer can also fire arrows at targets that are not adjacent (up to 6 Spaces away!). This is called a Far Attack.



Your Heroes' Attack (ATT) score indicates how well they can damage an opponent's Strength. Strength is your life! When your Hero loses all of his/her Strength, that's it - That Hero is eliminated from the game.

Ok. So go ahead, Player 1. Decide what your Archer and Commoner are going to do! Just remember, each Hero performs all of his/her Actions before you can continue to the next.

If you want to Move: Move your Hero a number of Spaces up to his/her MOB score, to any Space you wish (provided that Space doesn't already have a wall or another Hero in it). But if you break adjacency with an opposing Hero, the other player immediately gets to make an Opportunity Strike (a free Near Attack) against your Hero before you are allowed to complete your movement. If you wish (and your MOB is high enough), you can also break up your movement so that you move before and after an Attack. For example, with his MOB of 2, your Commoner could move one Space, Attack, and then move the other Space.

If you want to Near Attack an Adjacent Opponent: Draw a Battle card!

***If you draw a Miss, at your discretion, you may perform the Battle Option indicated on the card.

***If you draw a Hit, you automatically damage your target’s Strength for an amount of points equal to your Hero’s ATT score (plus Hit bonus if specified on the Battle card), minus your target’s Near Defense score.

If you want to Far Attack an Opponent 6 Spaces away or less, confirm you have Line-of-Sight to your target. Your Hero has Line-of-Sight if you can draw an imaginary line from the middle of your Hero’s token to the middle of your opponent’s token and there are no other Hero or wall pieces blocking it. If you have Line-of-Sight for a Far Attack, draw a Battle card!

***If you draw a Miss, at your discretion, you may perform the Battle Option indicated on the card.

***If you draw a Hit, you automatically damage your target’s Strength for an amount of points equal to your Hero’s ATT score (plus Hit bonus if specified on the Battle card), minus your target’s Far Defense score.

Have you performed two Actions for both your Commoner and Archer? Good! Now it’s Player 2’s turn to do the same. Once both players have finished their turns in the Primary Phase, we move onto the Tactical Phase.

Again, each player draws a single Reserve and Battle card. The player with the highest Battle card Rank goes first in the next Phase - the Tactical Phase.

The Tactical Phase is just like the Primary Phase, except for two differences: In the Tactical Phase, players are allowed only one Action for each of their Heroes. Also, during the Tactical Phase, Heroes can break adjacency with opponents and not expose themselves to Opportunity Strikes. Think of the Tactical Phase as a chance to regroup your Heroes, retreat, or maneuver yourself into a better position to attack in the next Turn!

So who’s Player 1 now? Go ahead: perform one Action for each of your Heroes. When Player 1 is finished, Player 2 does the same. And that’s how a complete TactDecks turn works:

Begin Turn
1. Players draw a Reserve Card.
2. Players determine who goes first in Primary Phase.
3. Primary Phase: Player 1 performs two Actions for each of his Heroes.
4. Primary Phase: Player 2 performs two Actions for each of his Heroes.
5. Players draw a Reserve Card.
6. Players determine who goes first in Tactical Phase
7. Tactical Phase: Player 1 performs one Action for each of his Heroes.
8. Tactical Phase: Player 2 performs one Action for each of his Heroes.
End Turn

Now, you’re probably wondering about those Reserve cards! A Reserve card is drawn before every Phase, and you can hold up to 5 in your hand (if you already have 5, you can’t draw any more).

Reserves serve three different uses:

First, after the very first Primary Phase, the player order is determined by whoever is holding the most Reserve cards. Players holding more cards always go first (in the case of a tie, draw a Battle card and compare Rank).

Second
, Reserves may be discarded during the Tactical Phase to Heal one of your Heroes one point of Strength. You can Heal by discarding a Reserve card at any time - even someone else’s turn, and even after your Hero has taken enough damage to be eliminated! You can also discard multiple Reserves at once to Heal multiple points of Strength on a single Hero or multiple Heroes.

Third, and most importantly, a Reserve can be used to "bend" certain Actions you may take or be targeted by. Each Reserve has a potent primary ability which can be used to do things like negate a successful Hit, increase your dealt damage, avoid Opportunity Strikes, move faster, or even turn a Miss into a Hit!

So begin the Primary Phase for your second turn, and get to know your Reserve cards!

When all but one Hero has been eliminated, the game is over. The player of the remaining Hero claims victory - but both players are now on well on their way to becoming TactDecks masters!
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Quote:
Now, you’re probably wondering about those Reserve cards! A Reserve card is drawn before every Phase, and you can hold up to 5 in your hand (if you already have 5, you can’t draw any more).


I would say for reserve cards instead of it being that you can't draw anymore that they should be able to draw and discard. That would seem to add a bit more tactical choice to it especially since the reserve cards are a bit diverse.

Is there an artifact or command ability that allow a player to sacrifice the action of one Hero in order to grant another action to a different Hero?

Do you think it would be possible to highlight the differences between the original post and your updated one?

Quote:
I'm not quite following that one... Do you mean, do the Reserve cards all explicitly state they can be discarded for a 1 point Heal? I'd considered putting that on there, but it seemed redundant, since it's a rule about how to use the card rather than a conditional rule native to the card itself.


Yes I mean does each card state that they can be discarded for 1 point of health. I think it would be better to have it on there since it would be a great reminder and reduces having to reference the rulebook.

Quote:
Ah! Umm... yes. But it's rare. In the basic tutorial game, definitely not. Once you add in Artifacts... yeah... there's a couple there that could potentially do that. Hmm... when I was writing those up, I wasn't thinking about that in terms of win condition, insofar as I was just viewing it as a "nobody wins" stalemate. Arrgh... so I need to visit that again. Is it bad to have a stalemate? It'd be a very rare occurrence.


Whether a stalemate is good or bad depends on who you ask. From my perspective since it's rare I would think it's not a problem even in real battles there is not always a clear winner.

Quote:
There's no alternate conditions in the base game, other than elimination. I'll probably put some additional variants either online or in the back of the rulebook.


Asa thematic gamer it makes it a more enjoyable game to have more than just "fight this guy because he is there" sort of thing. Even if that's all there is at least some kind of story would make it better I would think.
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Bump for interest.
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Eric Etkin
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Thanks! I hope to have the first draft of the rules up in a few more days. It's a bit tricky since it'll be a PDF file and not an living-text document, so questions/changes/suggestions from that point onward will have a bit of a lag time.

From there, I'll need to finish/tweak the art on a few more pieces, compile the PNP sheets, and write up the PNP supplemental charts for those who don't want to print/cut/sleeve all of the cards.

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Awesome! Thanks for the update.
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Work in progress:

Set up page for full game -

 
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"Space" is confusing. Is it the same as "tile" (in which case, just use "tile" all the time) or are there multiple spaces on a tile (in which case, you need to define what exactly a "space" is).
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PBrennan wrote:
"Space" is confusing. Is it the same as "tile" (in which case, just use "tile" all the time) or are there multiple spaces on a tile (in which case, you need to define what exactly a "space" is).


Each tile is divided into 16 (one inch) Spaces (but I don't get into conventional measurements).
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